Newsclips Featured

10:48am EDT October 23, 2001
Surviving site development

The tribal council has spoken. When it comes to e-learning, many have ventured -- few have succeeded. But Manpower has proven to be a consummate survivor in the development of its Global Learning Center (www.manpowernet.com), a training and career development tool to help meet the demand for skilled professionals.

"Developing the site was no easy trek," admits Lisa Doyle, Manpower's area sales manager. "There were numerous pitfalls, dead-end paths and fruitless ideas. But we overcame them in blazing our trail to success."

Things could have been worse, Doyle observes. At least there was no bug-eating involved in this adventure.

Back to basics

J. Michael Kolk swears by his Sharp Palm Pilot, proclaiming it's the best productivity and organizational investment he's ever made. "Not only does this 6-ounce, palm-size device replace my 4-pound, 8-by-10 paper planner, it's altered the way I think about scheduling my time. No more scribbling on sticky notes," says Cohen, a partner and CPA at Cohen & Co. in Akron.

Shortly after he purchased his PDA, a skeptical colleague challenged him, "But, can you do this with your gadget?" and promptly tossed his bulky Day Timer onto the floor. Kolk quipped, "Nope, and if we measured progress by that standard, we should all get rid of our cell phones and go back to the tin can on a string!"

Can you spell 'spaghetti?'

Most CEOs have a storehouse of jokes and trivia questions for occasions such as client dinners and company parties. For example, which country is represented by a flag of just one color, and what color is it? It's the Libyan flag -- a plain green rectangle.

"My trivia collection comprises print and broadcast spelling and grammatical errors," says W.R. Covey, founder of the Canton-based Covey & Koons advertising agency. "Two of the most mangled usages are 'myriad' and 'complement/compliment.' And my collection also includes seven different ways to spell spaghetti."

It's up to you

Two decades ago, desolate downtown Akron cried out for urban renewal. Keep Akron Beautiful became a major catalyst in the revitalization we see in downtown Akron today.

Each year, the "Take Pride in Akron" award recognizes the efforts of businesses, organizations and individuals that sponsor KAB programs, such as Flowerscape and Adopt-A-Site. Flowerscape provides floral display sites throughout the city on traffic islands, city corners and downtown expressway ramps, and at Canal Park and Firestone stadiums. Adopt-A-Site works with volunteers from area businesses and organizations that help plant and maintain public lands in Akron.

"This physical revitalization has subsequently paved the way for the economic revitalization of downtown Akron that attracts new businesses and consumers," says Paula Davis, KAB director. Celebrating its 20th anniversary with a new tagline, "It's up to all of us," KAB is seeking greater participation from area businesses, organizations and individuals. To become involved, call (330) 375-2116.