During times of economic volatility, your bank can be a great partner

Financial institutions operate at the heart of our economic system and as such, are hyper-aware of market indicators and trends that can affect the credit quality of their customers.

The more opportunities you have to keep your banker up to speed on what’s going on in your business, the better equipped he or she will be to work on your behalf, says Rob Fernandez, senior vice president and business line manager in the Technology Banking Division at Bridge Bank.

“Remember, information is neither good nor bad, it’s just information,” Fernandez says. “Information allows decision-makers to make necessary adjustments, or derive valid reasons to continue to support the status quo.”

Those who have been in business for a while and have worked with an effective banker know what an experienced banker can do to keep the partnership on an even keel. They can help you respond appropriately when changes arise in your business that could affect the structure of your existing credit facilities.

“While you might be concerned about revealing too much, if there is important new information about your business that could impact your financial condition, it will eventually surface,” Fernandez says.

“When it does, and if it’s a surprise to your banking partner, their efforts to help you and your business could be nullified due to the resulting uncertainty.”

Smart Business spoke with Fernandez about the gains that can be realized by allowing your bank to work as a partner in growing your business.

Take advantage of networking opportunities
When your bank partner invites you to lunch or an evening event, go whenever possible. Neither of you might be really into whatever sporting or networking event is available, but you’ll end up having quality time getting caught up on each other’s business, not just yours. You want to know how your banker is thinking about the world too.

If you haven’t been invited out for a while or you’ve turned them down repeatedly, take the initiative and invite them to lunch, a corporate event, a networking party, etc. Trust is developed through personal relationships.

When you meet with your banker in a relaxed setting outside of the hustle and bustle of the workday, you can talk about those big-picture questions that you never seem to have the time to talk about. It’s an opportunity that can pay big dividends for your business.

Don’t try to hide your problems
If you know that your financial reporting is going to reveal a problem, don’t wait until your banker gets the report and then has to scramble to respond to internal questions. Give them a heads up so they have time to prepare a case on your behalf.

Your banker wants the relationship to work and wants to advocate for your business.

When you don’t reveal information that can help them do that, it’s akin to tripping your team member as they run to the hoop to score. You lose credibility and trust with them, and they lose credibility with their senior decision-makers, which ultimately comes back to haunt you for what can be a very long time.

When necessary, consider your options
If you don’t think your current banking partner has the courage, industry knowledge or capability to advocate for you, it might be a good time to consider options. Talk to your peers, CPA and attorney for referrals and get to know who’s out there.

Every region has a collection of very strong commercial bankers. By and large, business bankers are a passionate lot and are very protective of their clients. Banking might seem boring from the outside, but inside it’s a dynamic and highly relationship-driven environment filled with very educated and smart people. Make it personal and you’ll reap the benefits of a strong alliance. ●

Insights Banking & Finance is brought to you by Bridge Bank