How to keep a company successful over the long haul

Roger Weninger, Southern California regional managing partner, Moss Adams LLP

Roger Weninger, Southern California regional managing partner, Moss Adams LLP

It’s not easy to keep a company going for 100 years — there are going to be a lot of challenges to address along the way.

“There has to be a willingness to change and take chances,” says Roger Weninger, Southern California regional managing partner at Moss Adams LLP. “When I think of longevity, I think of growth. Not purely as it relates to size but also ingenuity, the willingness to change and remain relevant. The company that can continue doing the same thing and remain successful is the exception.”

Smart Business spoke with Weninger about common characteristics of companies that stand the test of time.

What are the keys to longevity for companies?

It’s very important to develop leaders, plural. Companies, no matter how successful they are, get to a point where they need to provide opportunities to others. That can be hard for an individual in charge to understand — the concept that he or she can do less and it will result in more. By allowing others to make decisions and feel a part of the success of the organization, you create a strong culture of growth and change. People thrive in these settings, and so will the business.

You also need to have leaders and decision-makers at all levels. To think that leadership takes place only at the highest levels within any organization is a mistake. Instill a culture of risk taking and empowerment where people at all levels feel they can make a difference and aren’t afraid they’ll be punished for making a mistake. You’ll be amazed at the ideas and the level of ownership people will take when they’re asked, and even expected, to contribute to organizational change and success.

Every organization should have strategic plans and goals that have application to every employee. In addition, each employee should know what contribution he or she can make to reach those goals.

How can a company stay relevant in changing times?

It sounds trite, but it goes back to your mission and focus — self-awareness of your strengths and weaknesses, as well as how you fit into the needs of your clients and customers. Creating this awareness within your organization will provide a clear decision-making and prioritization path for your people. If there’s doubt as to what your value proposition is, or what it isn’t, you can waste a lot of time and send confusing messages to your people and to existing and prospective clients. Being the best at something is always a good goal.

What poses the biggest threat to longevity?

Complacency. When things are going well, there’s a tendency to become satisfied and convince yourself that things will never change. The willingness to listen and actually hear what’s being said, rather than simply assuming you already have all the answers, is crucial. Again, you must have multiple decision-makers and leaders, and this highlights the need for ongoing succession analysis. Succession isn’t something that should be dusted off and practiced when the owner is ready to retire.

People want to see the opportunity to grow into leadership positions from the time they walk in the door. That doesn’t mean they want to take over the top spot in the organization within their first year of employment, but it does mean they want to feel relevant, appreciated and impactful. If they have to wait for someone to die or move on, they may not stick around very long. New leaders bring different ideas and knowledge, and not having that will restrict your ability to grow and sustain the organization through good times and bad.

There’s no such thing as staying flat — you’re either on an incline or decline. You have to always be working to get better. If you’re willing to listen, your people and your clients will tell you how.

Roger Weninger is the Southern California regional managing partner at Moss Adams LLP. Reach him at (949) 221-4047 or [email protected]

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