How to stay in front of tax issues before and after a M&A deal closes

For most company buyers, taxes are a priority when negotiating a purchase price. However, if tax issues are neglected during the integration phase, the negative consequences can be serious. To improve the likelihood of a successful merger, it’s important to devote resources to intensive tax planning before — and after — your deal closes.

During deal negotiations, you and the seller will likely discuss issues such as deductibility of transaction costs and the amount of local, state and federal tax obligations the parties will owe upon signing the deal. Often, deal structures such as asset sales can benefit one party and have negative tax consequences for the other, so it’s common to wrangle over taxes at this stage, says Sean Muller, partner-in-charge of Houston Tax and Strategic Business Services at Weaver.

“With adequate planning, companies can be spared from costly tax-related surprises after the transaction closes and integration of the acquired business begins,” Muller says. “Tax management during integration can also help your company capture synergies more quickly and efficiently.” You may, for example, have based your purchase price on the assumption that you’ll achieve a certain percentage of cost reductions via post-merger synergies. However, if your tax projections are flawed or you fail to follow through on earlier tax assumptions, such synergies may not be realized.

Smart Business spoke with Muller about tax planning after the deal closes.

What is one of the most important tax-related tasks in a deal?

Integrating accounting departments is critical, and there’s no time to waste. The seller may have to file federal and state income tax returns or extensions either as a combined entity with the buyer or as a separate entity within a few months following the transaction’s close. Companies must also account for any short-term tax obligations arising from the acquisition.

To ensure the two departments integrate quickly and are ready to prepare the required tax documents, decide well in advance of closing which accounting personnel to retain. If different tax processing software or different accounting methods are used, choose between them as soon as feasible. Understand that, if your acquisition has been using a different accounting method, you’ll need to revise previous tax filings to align them with your own accounting system.

What are the major areas of concern for companies related to tax planning and operational synergies?

Before starting to integrate products, personnel and facilities, examine the tax implications of those actions. Major areas of concern include:

  • Supply chain integration. Combining the logistical operations of both companies may make fiscal sense on paper, but there could be tax consequences. Say, for example, that you’re planning to close your seller’s main warehouse and fold operations into your company’s existing warehouse facilities. What if the acquisition’s warehouse is domiciled in a more favorable tax locale than your warehouse?
  • Divestitures and sell-offs. Buyers often spin off unwanted divisions or products when they acquire a business, but from a tax standpoint such moves can be costly. For example, selling a segment could eliminate certain tax write-offs or protections. You also need to plan for the tax consequences of selling newly acquired assets.
  • Global implications. International acquisitions can be a tax minefield. Companies should keep in mind the kinds of new exposures the deal carries, such as value-added taxes. Also, consider how a foreign purchase may affect your company’s effective tax rate. Be sure your M&A advisory team includes people who are knowledgeable about the relevant tax laws.
  • Enterprise resource planning (ERP). If the two companies’ ERP systems aren’t merged and synchronized, data collection could slow or you could lose tax data. This could affect the accuracy and speed of the combined organization’s financial reporting.

When acquiring a company, your to-do list will be long, which means you can’t devote all of your time to the deal’s potential tax implications. However, the tax consequences of M&A decisions may be costly and could impact your company for years. So, if you don’t have the necessary tax expertise in-house, work with outside advisers that do.

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