How organizations can become better prepared for open enrollment

Fall is upon us and we’re getting closer to the end of 2016. That usually means it’s time for health insurance open enrollment for the coming year. This can be a confusing and stressful time for many employees. Is there anything organizations can do to make the process go more smoothly?

“Research shows that employees are not as well-informed about their benefits as human resources (HR) professionals might think,” says Veronica Hawkins, Medical Mutual vice president of Statewide Accounts. “There are a variety of ways organizations can communicate better and make the rollout of health care plans easier.”

Smart Business spoke with Hawkins about the ways organizations can help their employees understand the process, while also helping them become better health care consumers.

Why is open enrollment so confusing for employees?

Most employees don’t consider themselves to be very knowledgeable about health insurance. They’re also unsure about when they can make changes to their plans. Less than half know they can change their benefits because of qualifying life events, like marriage, divorce or the birth of a child.

This shows that employers can do a better job of informing employees of their options.

What should organizations ask of their carrier?

After an organization has made the decision about which health insurance plan to purchase for employees, it can be difficult to make sure employees understand what’s available to them. Employees often have a lot of questions during open enrollment.

It’s the carrier’s job to provide a variety of materials and support to help these employees better understand their benefits. Some will schedule on-site meetings with employees to answer questions and review plan benefits. Organizations should definitely take advantage of these options since they can help save a lot of time and effort.

How can organizations communicate better?

Surveys show one-on-one meetings, direct mail pieces and information on the organization’s website are the top three most preferred communication methods. One-on-one meetings won’t be possible for every organization, but a more personal touch throughout the open enrollment process can reduce anxiety and lead to better understanding.

Bringing in a benefits counselor is another good option. This can be someone who works for an employer or is brought in from a broker or third-party benefits administrator, or TPA, to be a point person for all benefits questions. Having an expert available to guide employees through the open enrollment process can improve their experience.

Organizations can use their own Intranet, internal websites and HR platforms to provide employees with important information about their benefits. Some companies even handle their open enrollment online, which younger employees appreciate.

Organizations should also take advantage of any online tools offered by their carrier. These tools can help members better manage their health care, keep an eye on deductibles, find providers and more, to help control their costs.

What are some other best practices?

The open enrollment period shouldn’t be the only time during the year an organization talks about its benefits program. Employers can make an effort to keep an open dialogue and remind employees to take advantage of their benefits. This will help prepare them to select benefit options each year based on their needs and those of their families.

It’s a good idea to write about employee benefits regularly in employee newsletters or on an internal blog. These are easy ways to remind employees of the value of their benefits program.

Insights Health Care is brought to you by Medical Mutual