Simple, visible moves help in achieving a culture of wellness

Small changes, big results — that’s not always how things work, especially when it comes to health and wellness. But, in terms of the workplace, small changes can often do the most to encourage a culture of wellness.

“You can make a big difference in the lives of employees simply by making the work environment more conducive to wellness,” says Dr. Michael Parkinson, senior medical director of UPMC Health Plan and UPMC WorkPartners. “It doesn’t take major, costly changes to have an impact. Small, simple, but visible moves can communicate that employers are serious about improving the health, safety and well-being of their most precious asset — their employees.”

Smart Business spoke with Parkinson about small changes that can impact wellness.

What are some ways employers can impact employee wellness at the workplace?

One place to start is to encourage employees to walk away from their desks. Cubicles are a mainstay of many workplaces and employees spend much of their time in front of computers. If ‘sitting is the new smoking’ — yes, sedentary lifestyle is a major contributor to death and disease in the U.S. — then getting employees up and moving more needs to be built into each workday.

Leading companies schedule ‘recesses’ throughout the workday, emphasizing stretching, walking meetings and brief walks. Opening an attractive break room or workplace cafeteria encourages employees to not eat at their desks and move at lunchtime.

In early studies, standing workstations have been shown to decrease musculoskeletal strain, improve concentration and increase energy expenditure. Consider introducing one swing activity workstation per group of employees, if the expense for a total office reconfiguration is unaffordable.

Can employers actually increase their employees’ physical activity?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined that people who get adequate amounts of physical activity have reduced rates of chronic disease, are better able to maintain a healthy weight, can better manage stress and perform better at work.

Employers can help increase physical activity by taking small measures, which make more activity the expectation and default option. For instance, unlocking the stairwells, making them attractive and encouraging all executives and managers to ‘take a hike’ multiple times throughout the day creates an activity culture.

Employers can support employees who bike to work with safe and secure places on-site for bike storage. They can promote active means of transportation, such as mass transit, by providing transit passes. They can encourage running, walking, biking or taking a fitness class during the day with flextime schedules. Even a single wastebasket in a central work area encourages employees to walk in order to dispose of trash.

How can employers promote healthy eating?

Workplace cafeterias are an ideal place to preferentially price and promote fruits, vegetables, whole grains, non-processed foods and sugar-free drinks. Vending machines can offer healthy alternatives to snack food. Sponsoring ‘new fruit and vegetable of the month’ giveaways can expose employees to foods rarely eaten, but loaded with vitamins, disease-fighting antioxidants and micronutrients.

What about stress, mindfulness and well-being?

All employers see direct and indirect costs of anxiety, stress, depression and lack of mental focus in their medical, disability, workers’ compensation and total productivity costs.

Can the office space or workflow be made less stressful? Are there unnecessary noises, interruptions or poor lighting that exacerbates an already challenging work environment? Are there quiet spaces or rooms for taking a break or practicing mindfulness (deep breathing with mental visualization) to relieve stress and re-charge?

Can employers work to decrease tobacco consumption?

The CDC estimates that smokers cost employers about $5,800 more than their nonsmoking co-workers. A smoke-free policy for the workplace and worksite property should be considered. Employers can make tobacco-cessation classes and services available, as well as materials that promote the benefits of living smoke-free.

Insights Health Care is brought to you by UPMC Health Plan