Scott Morey

“The man who says it can’t be done will likely be interrupted by somebody doing it.” — Unknown

“Whether you believe you can or you can’t, you’re right.” — Henry Ford

Attitude is everything. How we think and what we believe is our own personal reality. If we believe it is impossible, it is. On the other hand, if we believe that we can accomplish anything, we will very likely succeed or at least we will get a lot closer than we would if we didn’t even try. Our beliefs have power, ingenuity and genius contained within them.

 “Strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from indomitable will.” — Mohandas Gandhi

I was about 12 years old, and I was having a fight with my younger brother, Jay. Our fights were pretty close to a daily occurrence, so being older, bigger and stronger, I was pretty adept at neutralizing my smaller tormentor. As usual, I had Jay pinned, sitting on his chest with my legs on his arms. “Do you give up?” He said yes, so I let him up. Then he did something unusual. He attacked me again. I wrestled him down to the ground. “Do you give up?” “Yes,” so I let him up again. Again, I was attacked. On and on this went until I knew that either I had to run and get away from Jay or I was going to really hurt him and then I was going to be really hurt. On that day I learned a valuable lesson: You can’t beat a man who will not quit. Jay still doesn’t know what it means to quit.

My personal motto is: “I will persist until I succeed.” I recognize that I may not be good enough, strong enough or smart enough to succeed today. I know that sometimes circumstances beyond my control will interfere in my plans and no effort on my part will change that reality. But if I remain committed and continue to work, I know that I will eventually succeed. The sad reality of life is that most of us beat ourselves by not trying our best, not persevering through trial and difficulty and not remaining committed to ultimate success. To me, trying my best, giving everything that I have to give toward achieving my goal is success in itself. At the end of the day, I know that if I gave my best, leaving nothing in reserve, then win or lose I can feel good about myself.

 “A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.” — Sir Winston Churchill

No one likes to be around a pessimist, a complainer, a victim. No one likes to be around someone who always sees the problems and can never quite get to the solution. We as a company want to exemplify an attitude of optimism, capable confidence and a belief that we can get the job done. We always try to demonstrate a positive can-do attitude.

A positive can-do attitude doesn’t mean bluster or bragging. It means understanding the task and the challenge and moving forward with a commitment to doing what it takes to succeed. Can we know every problem that we will encounter? Can we always know with certainty that we will succeed? No. But we can know that we will give our best to meet whatever challenges we face and we will persist utilizing every resource at our disposal.

The way that we approach problems or challenges speaks volumes to our customers.

Customers fear the unknown and fear that they won’t be prepared. They are relying on us to quiet their fears and to solve their problems. When we address issues, questions and challenges with a can-do attitude, their fear turns toward confidence.

We need to tell them the actions that we are going to take and let them know that we are committed to meeting their needs. Let them know that we have the people, system and ability to do the job. Let them know that we will be personally responsible for insuring that our company gets the job done. When customers see that and see us as people who can get the job done, they’ll want to be part of that team.

Scott Morey is president of Morey Corp. During his 36-year tenure, the company has experienced marked growth and an expansion of service and product offerings. Morey has played a key role in developing and implementing the company’s best-in-class program management and quality systems. He serves on the board of directors for Morey Corp. and 10G (a joint venture with Caterpillar). He is also a member The Young Presidents’ Organization.

Saturday, 30 April 2011 20:01

Do you know your customer?

There are real people out there with many of the same needs, desires, problems and issues that you have. They have a job to do. They have demands and expectations that need to be met and a boss that at times can expect the impossible. Just like you, they want to be recognized and respected by their peers, supervisors and suppliers for doing a good job and also be rewarded by the company. And, just like you, they have a life outside of work, including family and friends.  Sometimes the stress of life impacts their behavior at work, and sometimes the stress of work impacts their life at home.

Customers are human, and like the rest of us, they are sometimes demanding, unreasonable, inconsiderate jerks. In my experience, most people do not want to act in a negative way, and when they do, it is usually because they have some problem or some need that is causing them pain. For most of us, pain is a call to action. We will do whatever we need to do to make the pain go away.

Your customer has specific goals, objectives, measurements and key success factors that will determine their success, raises and bonuses. At the same time, your customer has problems that impact their ability to meet those objectives. Remember this: Your customers’ every action and every request is motivated by some need or some pain. Do you know what it is? It may not be what you think. If you can discover your customers’ real needs and pain and help them to satisfy them, you have the key to a successful relationship. 

Our job is to help our customers achieve their goals, eliminate their pain and satisfy their needs while bringing benefit to our companies.

If we are going to be appreciated by our customer, we need to understand what it is that they value. We need to understand their goals, objectives, measurements, key success factors and problems. Every customer is different; they each have different strengths and weaknesses. They each have different definitions of what success means to them. Our challenge and opportunity is to identify what it is that our customer really wants, both as an organization and as individuals, then modify the way that we act and perform so that we deliver the correct results.

Their success depends in large part on you and your performance. Without you, they are unable to do their job. Consider these questions:

What are the biggest problems and challenges that you and your company are facing?

What kind of impact are those problems having on you and the company?

What do you think are the reasons why those problems exist?

What would have to be different for that problem to be eliminated?

How can we help you solve your problems?

During the course of this month, take the time to find out more about your customer. Find out about their company, department and family. Try to learn about their goals for the year. How is their performance measured and in what areas do they need to improve? Write it down. Communicate what you learn with your team. Then take the time to try to figure out how you can help your customer eliminate their pain, achieve their needs and realize their goals. When you can do that, you have earned the right to be viewed as a trusted ally, someone who can be counted on to help. That is really bringing value.

Scott Morey is president of Morey Corp. During his 36-year tenure, the company has experienced marked growth and an expansion of service and product offerings. Morey has played a key role in developing and implementing the company’s best-in-class program management and quality systems. He serves on the board of directors for Morey Corp. and 10G (a joint venture with Caterpillar). He is also a member The Young Presidents’ Organization.

Friday, 18 February 2011 11:45

Take responsibility

One of the most destructive characteristics of our current culture is the belief of so many people that no matter what happens, it isn’t their fault; they are not responsible. Smoke three packs of cigarettes a day and get cancer. It’s the tobacco companies’ fault for making cigarettes. Eat Big Macs and french fries while sitting around watching Oprah, and then blame McDonald’s for obesity. Let a child play with a lighter and gasoline, and then blame the pajama company because he lit himself on fire.

We make our own decisions in life and we are responsible for our own actions and our own inaction.

I am responsible. Responsible is defined as: involving personal accountability, able to be trusted or depended upon, characterized by good judgment or sound thinking.

Anybody can lay blame for problems or failure at the feet of others. It takes strength, character and courage to stand up and say, “I am responsible,” and then deal with the consequences. When confronted with a challenge beyond our control, it is easy to say, “It’s not my problem,” and give up. It takes determination and effort to grapple with an issue and see it through to successful resolution.

Our job is to perform for our customers. Customers are not always reasonable, customers are not always fair, customers are not always rational, and sometimes customers don’t even know what they really want. Despite those challenges, we must find and satisfy our customers’ needs because, ultimately, our customers will judge us based upon how well we meet or frustrate those needs — real and perceived. If we fail to meet their delivery needs, if we provide defective product, if we don’t respond to questions or concerns in a timely manner, if we promise to take an action and then fail to take it, customers don’t really care why. Our fault, the customer’s fault, our supplier’s fault, nobody’s fault — it doesn’t matter. All that matters is: Did we execute or did we not? Laying the blame for failure elsewhere doesn’t change anything.

One of the first customer calls I ever went on was to address a quality problem that we were having. I was a fresh-faced 22-year-old representing our company alone for the first time. As soon as I walked into the conference room, I knew I was dead meat. Production staff, engineers, buyers and the general manager were all there to greet me, and they weren’t happy. Rather than submit to the beating I knew was coming, I landed the first punch myself by accepting that we were responsible for the problem. I told them what happened, what we were doing to fix it and what they could expect from us. I could see the anger and hostility fade as they were replaced by a mixture of relief that we were fixing the problem and disappointment that the beating wasn’t going to be any fun.

I learned a valuable lesson. Our customers need us to stand up and accept responsibility and accountability for achieving agreed-upon objectives. They need us to communicate how we are going to get the job done, and then they need us to keep them apprised of our actions and our progress. Customers need to know that we will seek help, advice and support when needed. They need to know that we will call on critical resources with the required skill and expertise. Customers need to know that once we take on a job, we own the job, we own the results, and they can count on us to get the job done. When things go wrong, as they will from time to time, our customers need to know that we will stand up, be responsible and take the action we need to take to fix the problem.

Over the course of this next month, your challenge, should you decide to accept it, is to demonstrate to your customers that you are responsible. Demonstrate that you are accountable and that they can trust you to stick with it until the job is done.

Scott Morey is president of Morey Corp. In this role, he provides overall strategic direction and leadership for the company. He specifically oversees manufacturing, operations, finance and accounting, sales, engineering, product development, and technology strategy. During his 36-year tenure, the company has experienced marked growth and an expansion of service and product offerings. Morey has also played a key role in developing and implementing the company’s best-in-class program management and quality systems. He serves on the board of directors for Morey Corp. and 10G (a joint venture with Caterpillar). He is also a member The Young Presidents’ Organization.