Executives often wonder why they need to have machinery and equipment appraised, but these appraisals are important components of business today.

“Typically, appraisals are performed because of buy/sell agreements, mergers and acquisitions, business valuations, partnership dissolutions, insurance, bankruptcy, property taxes, financing and Small Business Administration lending. Other reasons would be divorce, estate planning or other estate issues, retirement planning, cost-segregation analysis and litigation support,” says Theresa Shimansky, a manager at Cendrowski Corporate Advisors LLC.

Smart Business spoke with Shimansky about how machinery and equipment appraisals are typically handled.

What is the useful life of an appraisal?

Generally, an appraisal is good for three years, but it depends on the current market, economy and industry. An appraisal’s useful life also depends on the availability of the type of equipment being appraised. The value can drastically change with economic factors such as supply and demand. 

Is a machinery and equipment appraisal beneficial when buying or selling a business?

Absolutely. Buyers want to know the breakdown between real and personal property. This is a cost segregation analysis or study. Appraisals are completed for many reasons, but most importantly for tax reasons — breaking the assets into different categories for depreciation purposes. 

What information and documentation will an appraiser require?

The appraiser will need to know the manufacturer, model, serial number and age of the equipment. This information typically can be found on a plate attached to the equipment. Mostly, it will be visible; however, sometimes locating this plate can be tricky. For example, restaurant equipment will occasionally have a kick plate covering the information plate. Machines may have the plate attached inside a compartment or near the motor, while others may not have one at all. When a machine does not have a plate, it is helpful if the owner has the original manual or sales invoice that should list most of the information. 

The appraiser also needs to know about the condition, special features and upgrades. Important questions to keep in mind are:

  • Does it work well?
  • Has it had any major repairs or is it in need of any?
  • Is it maintained according to manufacturer specifications? The appraiser may request to see maintenance logs or ask about special attachments or upgrades.
  • Is its software up to date?

An appraiser will evaluate and photograph each piece of equipment. When this is not possible, appraisers will note in the report which equipment could not be visually inspected and explain they are relying on the representations of similar machines’ condition and other pertinent information. 

What is a ‘qualified appraisal’?

A ‘qualified appraisal’ is clearly defined in Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Publication 561, where the appraisal: 

  • Is made, signed and dated by a ‘qualified appraiser’ in accordance with appraisal standards.
  • Does not involve a prohibited appraisal fee. 
  • Includes, but is not limited to, a description of property, condition, date of value, terms of the engagement agreement, qualifications of the appraiser, method used to determine value and basis for value.

Generally, an appraisal is considered qualified if it follows the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice, developed by the Appraisal Standards Board of the Appraisal Foundation.

What should you look for in an appraiser?

When searching for an appraiser, only use a ‘qualified appraiser.’ This is an individual, as defined by the IRS, who has earned an appraisal designation from a recognized professional organization for demonstrating competency in valuating property. Also, qualified appraisers regularly prepare appraisals for which they are compensated, and demonstrate verifiable education and experience in valuating the type of property being appraised.

Theresa Shimansky is a manager at Cendrowski Corporate Advisors LLC. Reach her at (866) 717-1607 or tes@cendsel.com.

Website: For additional information, please visit our website at www.cca-advisors.com.

Insights Accounting is brought to you by Cendrowski Corporate Advisors LLC

 

 

 

 

Published in Chicago