Intellectual property (IP) might be one of the most valuable assets of your company. But if it’s not protected, you can be foregoing a significant advantage in the marketplace.

There are four major IP categories:

  • Patents, which protect inventions;

  • Copyrights, which protect artistic forms of expression;

  • Trademarks, which protect brands; and

  • Trade secrets.

Generally, the types of IP small businesses may be interested in protecting are unique to the kind of company and its core competencies. For example, businesses that are predicated on developing new products or technology will be interested in patent protection, while another business may be identified by its brands and would want to protect those through trademarks.

However, John P. Cornely, of counsel at Fay Sharpe, LLP, says it’s important to take a close look at everything — from catalog photographs to manufacturing processes — to ensure the security of all of your IP.

Smart Business spoke with Cornely about successful strategies to identify and protect IP.

How does a small business identify and track its IP?

In a small business, to some extent, you have IP being created by many people in your organization at many points in the workflow cycle. You want to be systematic about identifying your IP. When it comes to patents, consider using an invention disclosure form. These forms can be made available to employees, especially those involved in the invention creation process, and are used to collect the data necessary for completing a patent application — inventor’s names, the date the invention was created, a description and/or drawings of the invention and the location of records that support the invention, such as a hard drive or lab notebook.

Encourage your inventors to use the forms and have regular sessions to review inventions and the potential for protection. Regular review meetings can also assist in identifying and/or ranking the relative importance of multiple inventions.

This form system can be used with other types of IP to identify creations and have a way to systematically collect information about them.

What are important inventions to protect?

It’s most important to protect those that make a product stand out in the market. As a small business, maybe you don’t have the resources to file 100 patent applications and might only be able to do a couple each year, so it’s critical to identify where to best apply your resources. Find the aspects of your products that make them more valuable and desirable in the marketplace. Think of it in terms of what features of your products your competitors would like to copy and select strategic patent protections that will keep your competitors from doing so.

Should companies federally register their trademark?

Yes. There are procedural benefits to registering your trademarks that will help in potential infringement actions.

When you start using a trademark in commerce you naturally gain common-law rights whether you’ve registered the mark with the federal government or not. However, one of the problems is those common-law rights are limited to the geographic area in which you’re doing business. So if you’re selling a product in Cleveland, Ohio, under a specific mark, you only have common-law rights in Cleveland. A federal trademark registration extends your rights nationally. Further, federal registration of your trademark provides you with procedural benefits if there’s an infringement action.

And, much like patents, you want to register those marks and brands that are most important to you if your resources are limited.

What can a company keep as a trade secret?

Sometimes there may be an idea that’s not a good fit for patenting or that you don’t want to disclose, for example, like a process of manufacturing a product. Trade secrets are great tools for protecting some ideas because, theoretically, the protection can last forever while patents commonly expire after 20 years. However, the secret generally has to be something no one else can easily discover, for example through reverse engineering; you have to treat it cautiously and control its dissemination. Many small businesses may think they have trade secrets, but since they are not effectively treating them as such that information won’t enjoy the legal status of trade secret, which has certain advantages.

Some things are easy to keep secret, such as formulas and manufacturing processes, because only a few people have or can discover that information. If the information can be discovered from viewing or reverse engineering your product, you won’t be able to keep that a secret. One risk is that if your secret is discovered legitimately then you’ve lost your trade secret status, but if someone were to uncover your trade secret through theft or breach of contract, then you have a case.

How does a small business secure rights to the company’s IP from its employees and contractors?

While this is important, it’s also often overlooked. You want to have some language in your employee or contractor agreements that details ownership of any IP rights. Contrary to what some might think, it’s not always the small business that owns the rights to IP developed by contractors. For example, when hiring a contract photographer to take pictures for your website, the copyright for the work (i.e., the photographs) stays with the photographer unless you have a written agreement that says otherwise. That also extends to contract programmers who can retain the copyright for developed software absent a sufficient written contract to the contrary.

In general, it’s a good rule to have your agreements explicitly spell out IP ownership rights in writing up front.

John P. Cornely is of counsel at Fay Sharpe, LLP. Reach him at (216) 363-9000 or jcornely@faysharpe.com.

Insights Legal Affairs is brought to you by Fay Sharpe, LLP

Published in Cleveland

Intellectual property (IP) is an area regularly overlooked; however, this is a pivotal area of law, especially for entrepreneurs and mid-size businesses.

“We often get calls once a client has already landed in some sort of IP trouble, but many of these issues could have been averted through some simple diligence early on,” says Salil Bali, an Intellectual Property Litigator at Stradling Yocca Carlson & Rauth.

Bali says many people are overwhelmed by the topic and might think it to be in the purview of larger companies.

“Surprisingly, for small businesses, this is an area we have seen affect them the most, and often this impact is significant,” he says.

Smart Business spoke with Bali about the importance of protecting your intellectual property, regardless of the size of your company.

What types of businesses are most at risk when it comes to IP?

Most people, when they think about IP, assume it pertains just to tech-based innovations. However, at some level, every company has IP rights to protect. In today’s world, fewer companies have tangible assets such as equipment, manufacturing facilities or real estate. Instead, the vast majority of companies today have most of their assets based on IP rights. This includes the ‘mom-and-pop’ yoga studio that needs to protect its name, all the way to the biotech company that has inventions to protect. No matter what type or size company you have, there are aspects of IP law that touch your company and those rights need to be protected.

What are some common intellectual property issues entrepreneurs should recognize?

The four main areas of IP affecting business today are trademarks, copyrights, patents and trade secrets. Companies need to be aware of all four areas and how to protect themselves with regard to each.

Trademark law deals with the protection of a word, name, symbol or device used to indicate the source of the goods or services. The purpose is to distinguish from other similar goods or services and prevent public confusion. When determining your brand or company name, you should perform trademark clearance to ensure you don’t infringe on pre-existing marks and that your desired mark is strong and protectable. Discussing such issues with a trademark attorney early on can minimize exposure and create IP assets for a company right out of the gate.

Copyright law deals with the protection and permissible uses of original works of authorship, including photographs, videos and written documents. These issues often arise with hastily launched websites, when companies start loading copyrighted images or text without first getting permission or the appropriate licenses. This could lead to cease-and-desist notices and claims for damages. Similar issues can arise with the use of personal likenesses, especially those of celebrities.

Patent law grants an inventor the right to exclude others from making, using or selling his or her invention. If you have an innovative idea, it’s important to talk with an attorney to determine what is patentable and whether or not your idea infringes on other patents. Doing this early diligence can protect your idea from being abandoned to the public domain or help you sidestep and minimize potential litigation exposure.

As far as trade secrets, companies need to be mindful about how they manage information to make sure secrets stay protected. Early-stage companies often aren’t careful about employment contracts and what information is being divulged to whom. This lack of discipline can adversely affect the company’s ability to claim trade secret protection. If you share sensitive information without outlining the recipient’s duties to hold it in confidence, you can lose the ability to protect your trade secrets.

What are the potential consequences of ignoring intellectual property issues?

The risk of not protecting your mark is that someone else assumes a similar name and thus limits or destroys the value of your brand. Though there may still be recourse, it becomes an uphill battle. An infringement lawsuit by a trademark holder for your use of a confusingly similar mark could cost your company its brand and/or logo, the goodwill associated with them and subject you to potential damages.

The risk with copyright infringement is financial penalties. Unlike patent and trademark laws, there are express damages written into the copyright statute that can be considerable.

The consequence for infringing on a patent is litigation, which may result in an injunction preventing further sales or use of the infringing product. Damages and costs in such cases can quickly add up. Conversely, if you fail to seek patent protection for your innovation, you could permanently lose your ability to protect your invention. When you have a new idea, there are key timelines you should be aware of that can be impacted by public disclosure and sale. You must act quickly to secure your idea or you could lose your rights, even if your invention is otherwise patentable.

With trade secrets, it’s simple: If you don’t protect them, you lose them. As soon as a secret enters the public domain, it’s gone.

How could these problems be avoided?

Often, talking with someone who is knowledgeable can help you understand how to protect yourself from infringement. The costs associated with protecting yourself are proportionately low and can have a big impact on your company’s valuation when you’re looking for funding. The stronger your IP portfolio is, the stronger your company is. However, if these issues are ignored, it can become a costly distraction for you and your company. Taking steps early on to make sure your IP house is in order can pay dividends.

Salil Bali is an Intellectual Property Litigator at Stradling Yocca Carlson & Rauth. Reach him at (949) 725-4278 or sbali@sycr.com.

Insights Legal Affairs is brought to you by Stradling Yocca Carlson & Rauth

Published in Orange County