As technology continues to move forward exponentially, end users are flocking to the latest versions of notebooks, tablets, smartphones and other mobile devices.

Against this backdrop, remote data security (RDS) is becoming increasingly important for businesses. Having an appropriate data protection strategy across the board in any organization can help ensure that the company protects its end users, shields its intellectual property and protects its rights.

However, many businesses fail to do so, as convenience tends to trump security, says Steve Carter, president and CEO of ii2P.

“We try to make small and medium-sized businesses aware that it’s a mistake to only focus on convenience,” he says. “Security should never be a subordinate element when transitioning toward remote data platforms.”

Smart Business spoke with Carter about what businesses need to know about RDS to keep their data safe.

What are the challenges associated with RDS?

First, it’s important to understand how the concern of RDS came to be: We, the users, created it. The introduction and proliferation of mobile computing devices put business-centric technology in the hands of an increasingly mobile work force.

In recent years, laptops, notebooks, tablet PCs, iPads, smartphones and other devices have become instruments of the business enterprise. In other words, they became information interchange enablers.

One thing that has remained constant is that data is still the end user’s primary concern. As such, access to and exchange of corporate data — now through remote devices — has surfaced as one of the most pressing needs of businesses.

Safeguarding the transfer of corporate data across remote devices requires controls. However, to an end user, controls mean inconvenience. And inconvenience often translates to, ‘I won’t take the necessary precautions to protecting my data.’

As a result, data is now being transmitted across more open or mobile platforms by users who are sidestepping security in favor of convenience.

Hasn’t technology adapted to address the needs of exchanging corporate data?

Absolutely. In fact, every generation of new mobile technology devices is amazingly more capable of delivering and exchanging data remotely. But that’s not the problem. The problem is that the ability to exchange information is much more effective than our ability to control data security remotely.

Having data secured in a mobile environment is the essential ingredient. It’s not enough just to have it delivered. We are all in support of making data convenient, but it has to be secure, as well. There has to be a balanced strategy.

What is the weakest link with RDS?

In some regards, this is a real paradox.  Remote data access was designed for the end user, but the end user is, without a doubt, the weakest link. Something as simple as password management provides a great example of how end users tend to overlook security measures. Users will write down their passwords, tape them underneath the keyboard, use the same one for everything, or store them in the cloud.

The increase in the loss of information, malware intrusion and identity theft is due to the nature of the end user who is unaware of the importance of secure protection in their environment, and has difficulty seeing the value when technology serves as an inhibitor of their convenience. The bottom line is that end users will always default to convenience over security. It will take a behavior change at the end user level to correct this.

Bring your own device, or BYOD, is becoming more commonplace at businesses. How will this affect RDS?

It’s important to keep a close eye on this development. The market initially said, ‘Mobile devices are opening up the dynamics of enabling global business. There is no need to stay confined in the office any longer. This is more convenient for the user.’

Next, the market said, ‘It’s more effective and efficient to allow end users to pick their own technology platform. So let them bring their own device to work. Just make sure they can access their data. This is more convenient for the user.’ Then the market said, ‘Store your data in the cloud, where it’s easier and faster to access and stockpile. This is more convenient for the user.’

Put this all together and there is an accelerating adoption of every mobile computing technology — each calling for faster remote access to business-critical corporate data — residing in virtual data repositories. And if you ask end users which is more important to them, convenience or security, the answer you’re most likely to receive is convenience.

How should small to medium-sized businesses approach the RDS challenge?

The market is calling for a robust solution that secures the end user from a variety of different functionality levels, from remote identity and access management to a secure, portable computing environment on managed and unmanaged workstations or devices. However, because convenience is trumping security at the end user level, businesses should investigate those products that make it easy for the end user to embrace RDS.

Steve Carter is president and CEO of ii2P. Reach him at (817) 442-9292 or scarter@ii2p.com.

Insights Technology is brought to you by ii2P

Published in Dallas

In the face of a stifling economy, many companies have focused on cutting costs as a means to improve profits. Such measures, however, don’t stand the test of time. Inevitably, quality goes down, as do sales over the long haul.

In the technology realm, it is more important than ever for business leaders to invest in new platforms and cater to customers’ needs. According to Steve Carter, president and CEO of ii2P, the market has spoken and they are asking for small and medium-sized businesses (SMB) to provide self-service platforms.

“Our clients that truly have self-service platforms are seeing overwhelming results,” he says.

Smart Business spoke with Carter about issues SMB leaders currently face, the importance of investing in self-service models and the rewards that can be reaped.

What main issues do SMB leaders face as it pertains to surviving in the marketplace?

First, I want to emphasize that the issues are not limited to small and medium-sized businesses. They face many of the same challenges that larger enterprises face — they need differentiating innovation such as a self-service platform. However, SMB leaders do have more difficulties adapting to the self-service platform. If they don’t embrace this new model and are unable to remain competitive from a cost and convenience standpoint, it will affect their ability to retain their company client base. Every decision that is made within a small business environment has an immediate and dramatic effect. Whereas with a large enterprise, although the results may be the same, the consequences show up in a longer time frame — it is not so immediate.

What should SMB leaders be investing in?

It is paramount to be market driven and keep pace with where your market needs are today. Today’s market — end users, clients, etc. — have changed dramatically. The demographics of the end user today are not in line with current service models. The service models of today, for the most part, don’t embrace self-service. Yet the behavior and desire of the end user is all about self-service. If you embrace innovative solutions and are able to provide a competent gateway to self-service you will reap the benefits.

What innovative solutions do you believe SMB players should take advantage of?

Many technology developments have been tailored to larger enterprise environments. A good example is something as straightforward as password management. About 30 percent to 35 percent of all IT service-related calls, whether it is in an enterprise environment or a small to medium-sized business environment, have to deal with this matter. Password management is becoming more of an issue today because, as security needs grow, the need for well-disciplined password management solutions becomes more pressing. While password management has been geared toward larger enterprises, this is an area ripe for small and medium-sized businesses as well.

How can this be funded?

The secret sauce is creating a formal strategy and approach for bringing innovation to the SMB, not just reacting. Over the past 15 years or so, a lot of businesses have been plagued with what I call ‘drop off the technology and run syndrome.’ The technology as a standalone looks good and accomplishes what it’s supposed to do. But unfortunately, that’s where a lot of companies have left it. They’ve made the investment in capital, but haven’t been able to realize the benefits because the solution really wasn’t a business solution, it was more of a technology solution.

In order to improve the existing platform, you should first look at the inefficiencies within your end-to-end platform. Examine the platform and change it to make it more efficient and more effective. I have not yet experienced an engagement where there wasn’t significant amount of monies being spent on ineffective end-to-end support solutions. In most cases, the money saved by optimizing the environment is more than enough to support the investment for self-service. There is no magic or big bucket of money sitting out there, but there is a methodology to determining how to begin investing in a self-service platform.

Where should the recovered excess money be spent?

You should invest those dollars in creating a platform that is going to be more market-driven. Then, you will be able to take the return on those monies and spend them on growing your business. It is important to invest in growing your business so you can become more competitive in the marketplace.

If this strategy is applied correctly, what are the outcomes to the SMB?

In today’s existing model, business is driven by using the platform less. In other words, providers are hoping that their end users, their B2B clients, etc, are using their existing model less because every time they use it, it costs the service provider. The paradigm shift is when you develop the self-service model; the more they use it, the cheaper it is. We’re talking about a complete re-engineering that will affect not only the behavior of the end user, but the provider as well. When you adopt the model that your end users prefer, you will benefit because the more they use it, the less it will cost you.

Steve Carter is president and CEO of ii2P. Reach him at (817) 442-9292 or scarter@ii2p.com.

Insights Technology is brought to you by ii2P

Published in Dallas

Earlier this year, Steve Carter, president and CEO of ii2P, challenged small and medium-sized businesses (SMB) to take a look at investment decisions around their current support models. This month, he stresses the importance of adopting a strong sense of urgency to avoid upcoming challenges.

“SMBs worldwide are projected to spend $1 trillion on IT by 2014. But unless something drastically changes, that spending could be like a heavy weight on a vessel headed into a perfect storm,” says Carter. “We want to stop, take a pause and not repeat history by spending money on technologies without really looking for a composite solution.”

Smart Business spoke with Carter about the challenges SMBs face, how to avoid common traps and the importance of managing cost pressure while strengthening customer intimacy.

Why do you feel there needs to be a heightened sense of urgency around creating change right now?

There are two fundamental problems facing the SMB market space: 1) cost pressures to stay competitive; 2) customer intimacy is in jeopardy. All companies with products and services wrestle with relieving cost pressures to maintain competitiveness. However, the most significant challenge I see is declining customer intimacy. This is an aspect that has been ignored. In order to sustain and grow market share, maintaining customer intimacy is paramount. Overall, a quality customer experience is missing, which shows up in lost market share.

What factors do you feel are causing these challenges?

A perfect storm is described as having multiple conditions that are colliding at the same time. There is a perfect storm in the SMB market today. First, all too often, we see both cost and customer intimacy elements are chained to an archaic standard support model. Such a model is actually designed to cost more to interact with the customer.

Historically, this has been why companies scrambled to find ways to cut back on support costs. This standard model is also designed to drive customer interactions out because it costs so much and reflects pure overhead. What this does is create an environment for the SMB that says, ‘Use it less, find a way to reduce calls for support.’ Sounds like a good thing, but it is deceiving. It’s a death trap for the SMB.

At the same time, the demographics of the end user have changed considerably and it is imperative that you respond to their wishes. Our clients have grown up in the technology world and favor what I call the ‘preferred end user support model’ — they prefer to satisfy the needs themselves rather than call a support center for help.

Lastly, by not considering and committing to a holistic approach when installing new technologies into your business, you are actually burdening your organization with incomplete and ineffective solutions.

How can the SMB know if it is facing the perfect storm?

There are some clear, obvious indicators that every SMB should use as beacons.

  • Check your specific market growth. Has your business grown at a healthy rate? If you are not growing at a healthy rate, the storm will ultimately catch you.

  • Check your client retention. This one is big. You can’t glaze over client loss as being a result of some external factor. Truth is, if you are losing clients, your model is working against you. The two key components are your cost competitiveness and your ability to be intimate with your end users.

  • Check your profitability. This one should be obvious but can be deceiving. If your margins are falling, for example, don’t automatically blame costs of raw materials. The cost of your support model is a more obvious culprit.

What options does an SMB have if it determines it is facing a perfect storm?

There are three options that always apply, and the first two are the most common traps that sink businesses. The first option is to do nothing. Keep steaming straight ahead, believing the situation will improve. The second option is planning to do something in the future. While this one doesn’t sound quite as bad as doing nothing, it has the same result: the longer you wait, the more you lose ground.

There is a third option: Do something new. Now is the time to face the perfect storm.

How should an SMB go about implementing a new approach in order to avoid the perfect storm?

The thing to remember is that surviving the storm requires a balance between the two elements I spoke of earlier: managing cost pressure while strengthening customer intimacy. The first step to bailing water out of your boat is to analyze and optimize your current support model. Then establish a clear strategy and create self-improving client intimacy through customer-facing self-service.

We’ve all made the mistake thinking that just purchasing technology is the answer. Take a new holistic approach that will bring technology, process and management disciplines as a complete and total solution. Examine the investment in current IT expenditures and make the hard assessment: ‘Am I getting real return on investment?’ If not, make a change.

Finally, establish committed continuous improvement processes that focus on balancing the customer intimacy mandate with prudent cost management. With these approaches in place, clearing the perfect storm is simply a matter of having your clients use your new model more.

Steve Carter is president and CEO of ii2P. Reach him at (817) 442-9292 or scarter@ii2p.com.

Insights Technology is brought to you by ii2P

Published in Dallas
Friday, 31 August 2012 20:01

How to balance convenience and compliance

In the past, a company’s employees were generally employees for life; there was little danger of them leaving, and if they did, the technology didn’t exist for them to take information with them.

Today, however, the average employee will hold eight to 10 jobs over his or her professional career, and if you don’t take the proper precautions, employees could take your data with them when they leave.

“Today’s ‘migrant worker’ is smarter and comes with strong skills sets, which necessitate more sophisticated data requirements regarding employee identity security,” says Steve Carter, president and CEO of ii2P.

Smart Business spoke with Carter about the importance of employee identity security and how to balance convenience and compliance.

Why should employers be concerned about employee identity security?

Businesses have three types of security needs: physical, data and employee identity. Physical security involves a company’s structure and its hard goods, data security relates to proprietary business or financial information and employee identity includes access to e-mails and network drives, and authorization to post information on the Internet. Employee identity security is just one leg of a three-legged stool that makes up corporate security.

Employee identity security is critical in today’s economy because of the changing face of the work force. This is the age of the ‘migrant worker.’ The employees who are working for you today will most likely be leaving your employment at some point for another opportunity. As a result, managing employee identity while those workers are with you is a fundamental protection that every company must have in place to reduce corporate vulnerability. Equally important is taking precautions to freeze employee identity when someone leaves your company so that he or she doesn’t take that to another job.

What specific challenges do small and medium-sized businesses face regarding employee identity security?

There is a fundamental balance to consider in terms of employee identity security relating to convenience versus compliance — convenience for the user versus compliance for the organization. Larger organizations are very good at forcing employees to comply with strict IT policies regarding identity security. However, this approach can backfire as users try to circumvent policies because adhering to them is inconvenient.

Conversely, with smaller to mid-sized organizations, there may be no one who is creating and monitoring policies. Without controls around necessary security policies in place, identity protection is left in the hands of individual employees, which can cause a litany of problems. Without protections in place, employees may decide that convenience is more important to them than compliance, resulting in the use of the same password for a company’s restricted database that contains sensitive financial information as for their individual social media accounts.

To deal with these concerns, small and medium-sized organizations often shift the responsibility of identity security to an outsourced IT vendor. In theory, this is a practical plan, as it puts someone in charge of security. However, this may not always turn out as planned. For example, if employees are working on a project after hours and are locked out of some critical system, they need their password reset quickly. And if the outsourced security provider is unavailable, employees may revert to using their personal passwords, putting weaker identity security back in the hands of the employees.

What is the cost for a small or medium-sized organization to invest in solid employee identity security?

Because of differences in size, complexity and requirements, there is no one right answer. Research has shown that enterprise investment in employee security costs the average company between $500 to $600 per user per year.

Many small or medium-sized organizations can’t afford this cost and, as a result, make no investment and expect employees to keep their own identity secure. However, this is a dangerous practice and is not a recommended approach, as it leaves companies vulnerable to security breaches.

What can small and medium-sized companies do to provide better employee identity security?

Start by standardizing security policies across the business infrastructure. Don’t have 10 different password management systems and 10 different login systems. This may sound like common sense, but it is a step that is often lacking in organizations.

The second step is to enable employees to manage their identities on their own but within the constraints of the standardized policies of the company. If employee identity is a rail system, then standardized policies represent the rails. Employees are allowed to throttle how fast they want to go and they can paint their train blue or red or green, but they must stay between the rails while maintaining their own identity. This provides employees with convenience but also ensures that they adhere to the company’s security policies.

How should employee identity security align with data security?

There is going to be turnover in your organization, so it is crucial to make certain that proper user authentication is aligned tightly with employee identity. Simply put, this means that while employees have the ability manage their personal identity, they only have access to pertinent information that is relevant to their job.

When an employee leaves, that person’s identity needs to be frozen and any access he or she had to corporate data must be shut off.

Steve Carter is president and CEO of ii2P. Reach him at (817) 442-9292 or scarter@ii2p.com.

Insights Technology is brought to you by ii2P

Published in Dallas

Sometimes it’s hard to focus on the basics. Technology changes on a daily basis, new competitors arise and the market is constant turmoil. It’s important, however, to slow down and take the pulse of your company. Are the fundamentals in place for a healthy balance sheet? A good place to start is making sure that you have a clear value proposition in place.

“A value proposition is a clear statement of the benefits a customer will receive from purchasing your products or services,” says Steve Carter, president and CEO of ii2P. “Essentially, it is your brand’s promise. A strong and differentiated value proposition can help your business capture your target market.”

Smart Business spoke with Carter about value propositions, the importance of focusing on current customers and how to keep your business in shape.

Why is it important for a company to have a value proposition?

Having a strong value proposition can sharpen your company’s focus and allow you to hone in on your greatest strengths. I call this principle ‘sticking to your knitting.’ You can’t be all things to everyone. You can be the very best at what you do, however. It’s important to know thyself. Understanding who you are allows you to refine your value proposition so you separate yourself from your competitors rather than trying to keep up with them. You will never succeed if you simply try to keep pace with your competitors. They will always stay one step ahead.

Make sure that your value proposition is concrete. If you get up every morning and try to convince yourself that you have a solid value proposition, then you probably don’t. A lot of companies make their value propositions complex. This is a big mistake. There is a misnomer that a proposition requires complexity in order for it to be valuable. The simple, easy-to-embrace proposition is much more effective. Rehearse the value proposition, understand those elements of your business, and market what you excel at. Your value proposition should serve as your anchor.

What are the benefits of focusing on current customers?

Being successful doesn’t mean going after every available customer; at some point, you won’t be able to service your clientele properly. It’s important to cherish each customer that you do have. The reputation you achieve from making your customers feel truly valued is how you grow your business.

Your current customers are your most important ones because they have laid the foundation for the success of your business. Building a reputation on the back of excellent service creates a solid platform for growth. Don’t grow your client base any further unless you are able to treat your new clients as intimately as the ones you first established.

What are the dangers of taking customers for granted?

Customers need to feel like you’re taking them to a higher level through the use of your products or services. Your job isn’t just to deliver your product and walk away; it’s about making sure that your product has value to them. Ultimately, this strengthens your relationships and allows you to grow your own business.

Customers in today’s environment are looking for leadership. They want you to maximize the benefits of your products and services into their core business. Too often, they are treated as ‘revenue inventory’ rather than ‘loyal assets.’ While it seems simple, you need to demonstrate to your customers that you are willing to fight for them, not against them. Your entire business and support model should be structured to demonstrate that you value your core customers.

It’s crucial that you listen to them and value their feedback. Otherwise, they’ll take their business somewhere else.

How can a business prosper by ‘staying in shape'?

You need to make certain that the investments you plug into your business are the kind that keep you lean and strong. In order to make wise decisions, you must listen to the market as it is changing. The demographics for end users are changing, and they are much different than they were five to 10 years ago. Their requirements have changed considerably. Support is a key element in retaining and growing your business.

Creating effective intimacy programs, backed by a market-driven support model, will keep your costs lower and your customer loyalty higher. If your support model is still equipped from a legacy standpoint, it’s imperative that you update it. Today’s consumers want and expect self-servicing support strategies.

No matter how good your product is, if you have a legacy support system behind it, you’re not serving as a leader. Institute a self-support model that is easy to navigate and provides value. Once such a system is in place, you need to pay attention to the feedback left by the end user. Staying in shape is not a one-time thing. You need to be disciplined and continually improve your processes. If you have that discipline within your business, your clients will see that you are always meeting or exceeding their needs.

How should businesses balance the need for convenience versus security?

In today’s society, people generally prefer convenience over security. There’s a tradeoff, however. The most effective strategy is to use a balanced approach that guards your intellectual property while enabling users access to the information they need.

Implementing the most up-to-date technologies, such as password management protection, protects the end user. Securing your information today is no more important than it was a decade ago, but it is more difficult.

Make sure you are implementing practices and solutions to keep data and identity access secure. It cannot be overstated: Your intellectual property and your competitive advantage are perfect targets for your competitors.

Steve Carter is president and CEO of ii2P. Reach him at (817) 442-9292 or scarter@ii2p.com.

Insights Technology is brought to you by ii2P

Published in Dallas

In the face of a stifling economy, many companies have focused on cutting costs as a means to improve profits. Such measures, however, don’t stand the test of time. Inevitably, quality goes down, as do sales over the long haul.

In the technology realm it is more important than ever for business leaders to invest in new platforms and cater to customers’ needs. According to Steve Carter, president and CEO of ii2P, the market has spoken and they are asking for small and medium-sized businesses (SMB) to provide self-service platforms.

“Our clients that truly have self-service platforms are seeing overwhelming results,” he says.

Smart Business spoke with Carter about issues SMB leaders currently face, the importance of investing in self-service models, and the rewards that can be reaped.

What main issues do SMB leaders face as it pertains to surviving in the marketplace?

First, I want to emphasize that the issues are not limited to small and medium-sized businesses. They face many of the same challenges that larger enterprises face — they need differentiating innovation such as a self-service platform. However, SMB leaders do have more difficulties adapting to the self-service platform. If they don’t embrace this new model and are unable to remain competitive from a cost and convenience standpoint, it will affect their ability to retain their company client base. Every decision that is made within a small business environment has an immediate and dramatic effect. Whereas with a large enterprise, although the results may be the same, the consequences show up in a longer time frame — it is not so immediate.

What should SMB leaders be investing in?

It is paramount to be market driven and keep pace with where your market needs are today. Today’s market — end users, clients, etc. — have changed dramatically. The demographics of the end user today are not in line with current service models. The service models of today, for the most part, don’t embrace self-service. Yet the behavior and desire of the end user is all about self-service. If you embrace innovative solutions and are able to provide a competent gateway to self-service you will reap the benefits.

What innovative solutions do you believe SMB players should take advantage of?

Many technology developments have been tailored to larger enterprise environments. A good example is something as straightforward as password management. About 30 percent to 35 percent of all IT service-related calls, whether it is in an enterprise environment or a small to medium-sized business environment, have to deal with this matter. Password management is becoming more of an issue today because, as security needs grow, the need for well-disciplined password management solutions becomes more pressing. While password management has been geared towards larger enterprises, this is an area ripe for small and medium-sized businesses as well.

How can this be funded?

The secret sauce is creating a formal strategy and approach for bringing innovation to the SMB, not just reacting. Over the past 15 years or so a lot of businesses have been plagued with what I call “drop off the technology and run syndrome.” The technology as a standalone looks good and accomplishes what it’s supposed to do. But unfortunately, that’s where a lot of companies have left it. They’ve made the investment in capital, but haven’t been able to realize the benefits because the solution really wasn’t a business solution, it was more of a technology solution.

In order to improve the existing platform you should first look at the inefficiencies within your end-to-end platform. Examine the platform and change it to make it more efficient and more effective. I have not yet experienced an engagement where there wasn’t significant amount of monies being spent on ineffective end-to-end support solutions. In most cases, the money saved by optimizing the environment is more than enough to support the investment for self-service. There is no magic or big bucket of money sitting out there, but there is a methodology to determining how to begin investing in a self-service platform.

Where should the recovered excess money be spent?

You should invest those dollars in creating a platform that is going to be more market-driven. Then you will be able to take the return on those monies and spend them on growing your business. It is important to invest in growing your business so you can become more competitive in the marketplace.

If this strategy is applied correctly, what are the outcomes to the SMB?

In today’s existing model, business is driven by using the platform less. In other words, providers are hoping that their end users, their B2B clients, etc, are using their existing model less because every time they use it, it costs the service provider. The paradigm shift is when you develop the self-service model; the more they use it, the cheaper it is. We’re talking about a complete re-engineering that will affect not only the behavior of the end user, but the provider as well. When you adopt the model that your end users prefer, you will benefit because, the more they use it, the less it will cost you.

Steve Carter is president and CEO of ii2P. Reach him at (817) 442-9292 or scarter@ii2p.com

Insights Technology is brought to you by ii2P

Published in Dallas

As technology continues to move forward exponentially, end users are flocking to the latest versions of notebooks, tablets, smartphones and other mobile devices.

Against this backdrop, remote data security (RDS) is becoming increasingly important for businesses. Having an appropriate data protection strategy across the board in any organization can help ensure that the company protects its end users, shields its intellectual property and protects its rights.

However, many businesses fail to do so, as convenience tends to trump security, says Steve Carter, president and CEO of ii2P.

“We try to make small and medium-sized businesses aware that it’s a mistake to only focus on convenience,” he says. “Security should never be a subordinate element when transitioning toward remote data platforms.”

Smart Business spoke with Carter about what businesses need to know about RDS to keep their data safe.

What are the challenges associated with RDS?

First, it’s important to understand how the concern of RDS came to be: We, the users, created it. The introduction and proliferation of mobile computing devices put business-centric technology in the hands of an increasingly mobile work force.

In recent years, laptops, notebooks, tablet PCs, iPads, smartphones and other devices have become instruments of the business enterprise. In other words, they became information interchange enablers.

One thing that has remained constant is that data is still the end user’s primary concern. As such, access to and exchange of corporate data — now through remote devices — has surfaced as one of the most pressing needs of businesses.

Safeguarding the transfer of corporate data across remote devices requires controls. However, to an end user, controls mean inconvenience. And inconvenience often translates to, ‘I won’t take the necessary precautions to protecting my data.’ As a result, data is now being transmitted across more open or mobile platforms by users who are sidestepping security in favor of convenience.

Hasn’t technology adapted to address the needs of exchanging corporate data?

Absolutely. In fact, every generation of new mobile technology devices is amazingly more capable of delivering and exchanging data remotely. But that’s not the problem. The problem is that the ability to exchange information is much more effective than our ability to control data security remotely.

Having data secured in a mobile environment is the essential ingredient. It’s not enough just to have it delivered. We are all in support of making data convenient, but it has to be secure, as well. There has to be a balanced strategy.

What is the weakest link with RDS?

In some regards, this is a real paradox.  Remote data access was designed for the end user, but the end user is, without a doubt, the weakest link. Something as simple as password management provides a great example of how end users tend to overlook security measures. Users will write down their passwords, tape them underneath the keyboard, use the same one for everything, or store them in the cloud.

The increase in the loss of information, malware intrusion and identity theft is due to the nature of the end user who is unaware of the importance of secure protection in their environment, and has difficulty seeing the value when technology serves as an inhibitor of their convenience. The bottom line is that end users will always default to convenience over security. It will take a behavior change at the end user level to correct this.

Bring your own device, or BYOD, is becoming more commonplace at businesses. How will this affect RDS?

It’s important to keep a close eye on this development. The market initially said, ‘Mobile devices are opening up the dynamics of enabling global business. There is no need to stay confined in the office any longer. This is more convenient for the user.’

Next, the market said, ‘It’s more effective and efficient to allow end users to pick their own technology platform. So let them bring their own device to work. Just make sure they can access their data. This is more convenient for the user.’ Then the market said, ‘Store your data in the cloud, where it’s easier and faster to access and stockpile. This is more convenient for the user.’

Put this all together and there is an accelerating adoption of every mobile computing technology — each calling for faster remote access to business-critical corporate data — residing in virtual data repositories. And if you ask end users which is more important to them, convenience or security, the answer you’re most likely to receive is convenience.

How should small to medium-sized businesses approach the RDS challenge?

The market is calling for a robust solution that secures the end user from a variety of different functionality levels, from remote identity and access management to a secure, portable computing environment on managed and unmanaged workstations or devices. However, because convenience is trumping security at the end user level, businesses should investigate those products that make it easy for the end user to embrace RDS.

Steve Carter is president and CEO of ii2P. Reach him at (817) 442-9292 or scarter@ii2p.com.

Insights Technology is brought to you by ii2P

Published in Dallas

Last month’s ii2P Insights article described the initial steps that small and medium-sized businesses (SMB) should take, considering that implementing a self-service platform is both strategic to improving customer intimacy as well as reducing overall costs.

This month, Steve Carter, president and CEO of ii2P, describes one of the easier elements companies can implement to transition to a self-service model — automated self-service password reset solutions.

“If you peel back the covers and examine the monthly call volume coming into IT support help desks across all business environments, easily 25-40 percent of the reason employees call is because they’ve forgotten a password or locked themselves out of something,” Carter says.

Smart Business spoke with Carter about why self-service password management is something SMBs should take a hard look at.

Why is password management so important to SMBs?

Intellectual property theft is significant — it compromises an SMB’s oftentimes thin competitive edge. SMBs should be proactive when it comes to password management. After all, the cost to implement a secure solution is a fraction of what could be lost in intellectual capital.

Many SMBs look to cloud-based IT solutions to run their businesses and lower their costs. However, this sets them up for the greatest opportunity for IP theft. While some cloud companies do provide stringent security controls, it can be a bit alarming to have all your company IP centralized into the cloud.

Cloud based solutions offer convenience, but this is not the top priority for an SMB — security is. The SMB needs to understand that both convenience and security can be obtained. If you have spent money on a tool and are still calling a service desk for help, you are spending too much. It’s important to build a solution that is convenient for your end users and is also secure.

How big a problem is ineffective password management?

I’ve been in the IT industry for 30 years and password management consistently accounts for 25-40 percent of all calls that come into a help desk. This is a huge number. The loss of productivity for an end user is significant. It’s not just the office user, but also remote travelers who have to call the help desk to get their passwords so they can do their presentations. Every year, millions of dollars are spent answering customer reset problems.

If you bring the right solution to the table, you can reduce overall IT costs significantly. If end users adopt your solution, you are going to increase your security, decrease your costs and protect your intellectual capital. It’s important to begin the process by automating the password reset in a manner in which the end user will actually use.

By implementing the right technology security solution you can remove the exposure of the end user, who is the weakest link in the chain, and enhance your security by gradually making it more complex.

What are some of the available solutions and which ones are best for the SMB?

There are a lot of cloud-based solutions that cater to one key element: convenience. SMBs who utilize cloud-based solutions are susceptible to security breaches. My recommendation is to tailor a token-based solution. Countries in Europe, the Middle East and Asia  are already accepting the smartchip, token-type approach. This solution is not as prevalent in North America yet, but will become more and more common.

There are smartchip, token solutions out there now that have been engineered from the end user’s perspective. This ensures that the change in the business application of password management does not reside at the help desk, but with the end user. Also, when you use this approach you are able to build a solution that is tailored to your specific environment and is able to expand as your business grows.

How can SMBs benefit from self-service password management?

Password management is an ongoing and growing concern. The ability to secure passwords should be a priority for every business, whether it is small, medium or large. You should focus on the end user, making sure that they embrace the solution you provide, rather than ignoring it. If you choose the right solution — which in my opinion is a chip-based, token solution — you are going to realize four key benefits:

1) Increased security

2) Increased end user compliance

3) Increased end user productivity

4) Reduced cost for support

Steve Carter is president and CEO of ii2P. Reach him at (817) 442-9292 or scarter@ii2p.com.

Insights Technology is brought to you by ii2P

Published in Dallas

Last month’s ii2P Insights article described how small and medium-sized businesses (SMB) are facing a “perfect storm” in terms of balancing costs and customer intimacy. This month, according to Steve Carter, president and CEO of ii2P, SMBs that have decided to take action should follow some tried-and-true guidelines.

“By clearly understanding the objectives for your enterprise, you can make certain that your implementation of an end user or customer self-service platform actually becomes the end users’ preferred method of receiving support,” he says.

Smart Business spoke with Carter about implementing a self-service platform and the benefits of providing value to end users.

What should be the first step in implementing an effective self-service platform?

If there is a single step that misleads a company worse than any other, it is not getting the setup right at the start. Most of the time, executives deliver the mandate for someone to implement a self-service solution, thinking that they understand the issues. Nothing could be more detrimental than starting out with the wrong calibration.

Companies need to understand the real objectives of self-service. It is not just about trimming costs. It is about creating a true change in human behavior that drives and motivates more intimate end user experience between the customer and the company.

The objective should be to attract and retain solid, powerful end user participation with the value that you are trying to extend. The objective should be about developing a lasting platform for customer intimacy.

What would be the next step?

Once the fundamental objective is established for implementing an effective self-service platform, then it’s time to determine the true opportunity for your customers to help themselves. Another frequent error is thinking that self-service is limited to helping users ‘fix’ their own problems, such as ‘how to’ questions, or ‘fill in something.’ While these are certainly common and often easy to incorporate, that’s not the limit of effective self-service.

Quantifying the true level zero (self-service) opportunity is going to be more expansive than you typically first believe. Credit your smarter customer for that.

What do business owners need to include in their self-service platform?

Customers, especially in this day and time, are looking for self-service interactions that yield more value and independence. It’s becoming more of an environment of, ‘I want to track this,’ or ‘I want to compare these two products,’ or ‘I want to manage the entire buying or fulfillment process on my own.’

Along with the fixes and the finds, it makes great sense to consolidate many of the functional interfaces that your users are using today. A great example is expanding the IT self-service site to also serve as the gateway to other business functions, such as human resources, or information review (relevant news feeds).

Tying your customer-facing self-service site to your fulfillment tracking (such as Fedex or UPS shipping), albeit seemingly insignificant, is huge when it comes to adding value to the self-shopper.

Finally, it’s important to find a way to collect measurements of customer experience with your self-service site transactions. This correlation is going to be the most valuable information you can harvest. It will help drive ongoing improvement to the site.

What are some of the best-suited and easy-to-implement aspects of end user self-service solutions?

Avoid making the site too cluttered, but at the same time, there are some relatively common-sense elements to include. Certainly, have a strong search engine tied into a well-maintained knowledge base of solutions specifically created for self-service. One horrific mistake many companies make is placing a massive technical knowledge base in front of general purpose users and telling them, ‘Have at it!’ I call that, ‘where angels fear to trod,’ and nothing disenchants a user more than that. It is intimidating, and many times users won’t return once they experience that.

Bring any enabling technology to the site, such as self-service password reset technologies, or the ability to create a service ticket, or check the status of an existing one. Users don’t want to have to call someone to do those simple things. Make that available.

Allow  users to submit requests for common services, or even new information. One caution here — someone needs to monitor and respond to those requests. If users ever sense that no one is minding the store, they will quickly lose confidence in the site, and revert back to labor-intensive methods. It’s hard to regain their confidence at this point.

What is the most important thing about implementing self-service?

This is big: Don’t succumb to building a ‘portal to nowhere ’. Standing up the self-service site that is an afterthought or an also-thought will fail. There is a proverbial bone-yard of customer self-service sites that have ended up there.

If you are not going to implement these three elements of a successful self-service platform — effective technology, solid business practices and committed managerial disciplines — save yourself the time and money and wait until you can.

Self-service is an investment to growing customer intimacy and loyalty. Done properly, it will change human behavior and deliver lasting benefits.

Steve Carter is president and CEO of ii2P. Reach him at (817) 442-9292 or scarter@ii2p.com.

Published in Dallas

Last month Steve Carter, president and CEO of ii2P, challenged small and medium-sized businesses (SMB) to take a look at investment decisions around their current support models. This month, he stresses the importance of adopting a strong sense of urgency to avoid upcoming challenges.

“SMBs worldwide are projected to spend $1 trillion on IT by 2014. But unless something drastically changes, that spending could be like a heavy weight on a vessel headed into a perfect storm,” says Carter. “We want to stop, take a pause, and not repeat history by spending money on technologies without really looking for a composite solution.”

Smart Business spoke with Carter about the challenges SMBs face, how to avoid common traps and the importance of managing cost pressure while strengthening customer intimacy.

Why do you feel there needs to be a heightened sense of urgency around creating change this year?

There are two fundamental problems facing the SMB market space: 1) cost pressures to stay competitive; 2) customer intimacy is in jeopardy. All companies with products and services wrestle with relieving cost pressures to maintain competitiveness. However, the most significant challenge I see is declining customer intimacy. This is an aspect that has been ignored. In order to sustain and grow market share, maintaining customer intimacy is paramount. Overall, a quality customer experience is missing, which shows up in lost market share.

What factors do you feel are causing these challenges?

A perfect storm is described as having multiple conditions that are colliding at the same time. There is a perfect storm in the SMB market today. First, all too often we see both cost and customer intimacy elements are chained to an archaic standard support model. Such a model is actually designed to cost more to interact with the customer. Historically, this has been why companies scrambled to find ways to cut back on support costs. This standard model is also designed to drive customer interactions out because it costs so much and reflects pure overhead. What this does is create an environment for the SMB that says, ‘Use it less, find a way to reduce calls for support.’ Sounds like a good thing, but it is deceiving. It’s a death trap for the SMB.

At the same time the demographics of the end user have changed considerably and it is imperative that you respond to their wishes. Our clients have grown up in the technology world and favor what I call the ‘preferred end user support model’ — they prefer to satisfy the needs themselves rather than call a support center for help.

Lastly, by not considering and committing to a holistic approach when installing new technologies into your business, you are actually burdening your organization with incomplete and ineffective solutions.

How can the SMB know if it is facing the perfect storm?

There are some clear, obvious indicators that every SMB should use as beacons:

? Check your specific market growth. Has your business grown at a healthy rate? If you are not growing at a healthy rate, the storm will ultimately catch you.

? Check your client retention. This one is big. You can’t glaze over client loss as being a result of some external factor. Truth is, if you are losing clients, your model is working against you. The two key components are your cost competitiveness and your ability to be intimate with your end users.

? Check your profitability. This one should be obvious, but can be deceiving. If your margins are falling, for example, don’t automatically blame costs of raw materials. The cost of your support model is a more obvious culprit.

What options does an SMB have if it determines it is facing a perfect storm?

There are three options that always apply, and the first two are the most common traps that sink businesses. The first option is to do nothing. Keep steaming straight ahead, believing the situation will improve. The second option is planning to do something in the future. While this one doesn’t sound quite as bad as doing nothing, it has the same result: the longer you wait, the more you lose ground.

There is a third option: Do something new. Now is the time to face the perfect storm.

How should an SMB go about implementing a new approach in order to avoid the perfect storm?

The thing to remember is that surviving the storm requires a balance between the two elements I spoke of earlier: managing cost pressure while strengthening customer intimacy. The first step to bailing water out of your boat is to analyze and optimize your current support model. Then establish a clear strategy and create self-improving client intimacy through customer-facing self-service.

We’ve all made the mistake thinking that just purchasing technology is the answer. Take a new holistic approach that will bring technology, process and management disciplines as a complete and total solution. Examine the investment in current IT expenditures and make the hard assessment: ‘Am I getting real return on investment?’ If not, make a change. Finally, establish committed continuous improvement processes that focus on balancing the customer intimacy mandate with prudent cost management. With these approaches in place, clearing the perfect storm is simply a matter of having your clients use your new model more.

Steve Carter is president and CEO of ii2P. Reach him at (817) 442-9292 or scarter@ii2p.com.

Published in Dallas
Page 1 of 2