Fred Koury

Tuesday, 16 December 2003 19:00

Keep it short

Welcome to the premiere issue of Smart Business Indianapolis, a monthly management journal for C-level executives of middle-market and large companies.

Before you say it, let me do it for you: "The last thing I need is something else to read."

I know how you feel. Running a growing organization is enough to keep anyone busy. The demand on our time from employees, suppliers and clients seems to increase every day. The sluggish economy only adds to the pressures of managing a successful business.

That's why we have designed a unique publication. After 15 years in the publishing business, we know to listen to our readers. The publication you hold in your hands -- the fifth in our growing chain -- is the result of all our listening.

In one-on-one conversations, CEO focus groups and written surveys, here is what readers like you told us they want in a local management journal.

1. Big minds, big ideas. Smart Business Indianapolis will tap into the top local business minds. Take this issue as an example. Our cover story tells how Galyan's Trading Co. CEO Bob Mang plans to keep customers coming back to his awe-inspiring stores after the initial glow has worn off.

Our Q&A feature, called One on One, showcases one of the region's top business voices, the Indy Partnership's Greg Schenkel. He talks with us about how a strong public-private partnership and cooperation with state and county governments has improved teh tax and business climate.

In the coming months, you'll hear from more of the best business minds in Indianapolis on issues ranging from leadership and motivation to brand-building and innovation.

2. Go to the source. To get the latest thoughts on best practices in key business areas, we have partnered with key local service providers in areas including accounting and consulting, health care, human resources, law and investment banking. They have front-line experience in dealing with the issues facing middle-market companies throughout the Indianapolis area. We work with these companies to develop commentaries on issues facing C-level management of middle-market companies. As I always say, wisdom comes from an abundance of councilors.

3. Keep it short. Most articles in Smart Business Indianapolis fill just a page. Only our major features are longer -- because they delve into the management styles and strategies of top executives. And don't look for us to drop on your desk some day like a phone book. We plan to keep our page count low so you don't have to fight to find the articles you are looking for.

You will find those three principles carried throughout the premiere issue of Smart Business Indianapolis -- and every subsequent issue -- just as our readers have come to expect the same from our other award-winning publications for the last 15 years.

Of course, that doesn't mean we don't know how to have fun, too. We realize that not every minute of your day is spent planning or executing strategy. So from time to time we will include other offerings, such as reports on the latest luxury autos, high-tech gear, books and travel.

Also, we will summarize recent executive changes on our Movers & Shakers page so you can keep up on what's happening with your peers.

So why are you getting Smart Business Indianapolis ? One of two reasons: Because of your success in building a business to middle-market status or your senior management role at a larger company that values the middle market. In either case, I hope you enjoy reading our premiere issue.

And I invite you to share your feedback with me by e-mailing me at fkoury@sbnonline.com or calling me at (800) 988-4726.

Wednesday, 19 November 2003 19:00

Be counted

More registered voters stayed home than went to the polls this last election. That voter apathy is caused by broken pledges by candidates and the feeling that one vote doesn't matter.

People don't take the time to study the candidates or the issues, and they cast their votes based on name recognition alone. Too often, candidates spend a lot of money on a campaign based on telling people what they want to hear in order to win the election.

What does this have to do with you? Everything. Each of us needs to stand up and be counted. We have the ability to make a difference. We need to demand more from our politicians than a good marketing strategy that tells us what we want to hear.

Several years ago, I wrote a column about potentially starting our own Political Action Committee. After giving this strong consideration, we decided not to. The purpose would have been to help our readers make informed decisions and promote a pro-business agenda. A PAC would have provided more financial flexibility and more political clout than individual campaign donations.

A PAC can be a great tool if you are on the right side of an issue backed by an influential politician. However, if you are not on the same side, it is very difficult to be heard, even with the help of the PAC.

How does your vote count when there are PACs that appear to have a lot more influence than your single vote? The answer is that every vote counts.

It doesn't take the formation of a PAC to accomplish our goals. We all need to take responsibility for ourselves to be good citizens. The collective votes of the business community have the same effect as a PAC.

There will come a time when money and a good marketing plan will not do the job. We need to find a way to get more people involved in politics, particularly in leadership positions.

The business community has a much greater responsibility than our own personal agendas. We must stand up and encourage the people in our circles to help make a difference and look out for the majority, or business will suffer.

Take action to improve the political landscape in this country. Get involved and use your vote wisely, because one vote -- your vote -- can make a difference.

Thursday, 30 October 2003 19:00

Keep it short

Welcome to the premiere issue of Smart Business Chicago, a monthly management journal for C-level executives of middle-market and large companies.

Before you say it, let me do it for you: "The last thing I need is something else to read."

I know how you feel. Running a growing organization is enough to keep anyone busy. The demand on our time from employees, suppliers and clients seems to increase every day. The sluggish economy only adds to the pressures of managing a successful business.

That's why we have designed a unique publication. After 15 years in the publishing business, we know to listen to our readers. The publication you hold in your hands -- the fifth in our growing chain -- is the result of all our listening.

In one-on-one conversations, CEO focus groups and written surveys, here is what readers like you told us they want in a local management journal.

1. Big minds, big ideas. Smart Business Chicago will tap into the top local business minds. Take this issue as an example. Our cover story tells how The Pampered Chef CEO Doris Christopher built her company from a simple concept to a business so powerful and profitable it caught the eye of the world's savviest investor, Warren Buffett.

Our Q&A feature, called One on One, showcases one of the region's top business voices, Chicagloand Chamber CEO Gerald Roper. He talks with us about the challenges facing the region and the chamber's efforts to fight taxes and encourage entrepreneurship.

In the coming months, you'll hear from more of the best business minds in Chicago on issues ranging from leadership and motivation to brand-building and innovation.

2. Go to the source. To get the latest thoughts on best practices in key business areas, we have partnered with key local service providers in areas including accounting and consulting, health care, human resources, law and investment banking. They have front-line experience in dealing with the issues facing middle-market companies throughout the Chicago region. We work with these companies to develop commentaries on issues facing C-level management of middle-market companies. As I always say, wisdom comes from an abundance of councilors.

3. Keep it short. Most articles in Smart Business Chicago fill just a page. Only our major features are longer -- because they delve into the management styles and strategies of top executives. And don't look for us to drop on your desk some day like a phone book. We plan to keep our page count low so you don't have to fight to find the articles you are looking for.

You will find those three principles carried throughout the premiere issue of Smart Business Chicago -- and every subsequent issue -- just as our readers have come to expect the same from our other award-winning publications for the last 15 years.

Of course, that doesn't mean we don't know how to have fun, too. We realize that not every minute of your day is spent planning or executing strategy. So from time to time we will include other offerings, such as reports on the latest luxury autos, high-tech gear, books and travel.

Also, we will summarize recent executive changes on our Movers & Shakers page so you can keep up on what's happening with your peers.

So why are you getting Smart Business Chicago? One of two reasons: Because of your success in building a business to middle-market status or your senior management role at a larger company that values the middle market. In either case, I hope you enjoy reading our premiere issue.

And I invite you to share your feedback with me by e-mailing me at fkoury@sbnonline.com or calling me at (800) 988-4726.

Wednesday, 22 October 2003 20:00

People power

Every day in business, we face the challenge of determining what value we place on people. Our employees have become nothing more than a means to an end, in many cases. What end? Money -- pure capitalism at its best.

As business leaders, we are forced to make decisions that are not always best for the people around us. With technology, competition and the economy, it is a safe bet we'll continue to face staffing pressures. The question is, how far will we go in putting us first and others last? If it's true that what comes around goes around, does this eventually come full circle and affect us the same we may be affecting others?

The answer is simple -- people are more important than profit. We must take responsibility for our actions. In our society, no one wants to take responsibility for their actions. It is always the other person's fault. But it is never too late to start putting people first.

Here are four steps to keep in mind the next time you are confronted with this situation.

* Don't look at people as just a line item on a budget. Each person provides value with different gifts and talents. Any one of them might hold the answer to the problems that have been holding your business back.

* Remember the Golden Rule. Many people think it is the gold that rules, but people make money, money does not make people. The strength of your people will propel your company forward, and the money will follow.

* Go beyond your confort zone to help people. Take the extra step to help your employees get through the difficulties that life can present. It will always pay off in the long run.

* Treat people the way you want to be treated. Don't talk down, be short or treat people like a commodity. Treat each employee like an executive, and he or she will start acting like one, taking ownership of the company.

Economic pressures always keep us focused on the bottom line, but behind the numbers lie people. Taking care of your people, no matter what the short-term cost, will ultimately help you succeed in the long-term.

Business is about making money, but people are the real engine that drives success. Take care of your people, and the money will naturally follow.

Thursday, 31 October 2002 09:53

Double trouble

Not making a choice is making a choice.

I refer to this fear of choosing as "double-mindedness." Everyone is looking for a guarantee. So many things are uncertain that people are afraid to make a choice.

In business, we need leaders who are not afraid to make decisions and live with the consequences -- good or bad. I'm not suggesting people make bad decisions, but rather that leaders need to lead. Too many people try to have everything by straddling the fence.

Here are five suggestions for making the best decision possible the next time a choice needs to be made.

1. Surround yourself with good people. Wisdom comes from an abundance of counselors. Don't look for people who will tell you what you want to hear. Look for people who care about you and the best interests of your company, and who will give you honest answers no matter how much you might not like it.

2. Gather as much information as soon as you can. This will help you make the best decision possible.

3. Use prayer. Whenever making a decision, I feel it is important to pray and include God. The prayer may not get answered the way you want, but at least you included him in your decision-making process.

4. Follow your gut instinct. This comes from experience, based on trial and error. As you learn from your mistakes, you will hone your instincts. When there doesn't seem to be logical information to base your reasoning on, let your instincts show you the way.

5. Follow the leader. Sometimes the best way to make a decision is to see what already works and improve upon it. Don't be afraid to copy someone who is doing something successfully.

Double-mindedness is choosing to be indecisive -- the worst choice of all. When there are tough choices to make, you can't have it both ways.

Get off the fence and lead.

Monday, 22 July 2002 10:07

The purpose of our success

The joy we derive from success can be nearly bottomless. To transform an idea into a profit-making venture is the goal of every business, and the process is not unlike watching your child change from helpless infant to crawling baby and finally to a toddler taking his first wobbly steps. Anyone who has been involved in starting a business and watching it grow into a vibrant enterprise can instantly relate to the deep sense of pleasure it brings.

But success can just as quickly become a sword with two edges. Money and power can transform the humble friend you grew up with into a ruthless cuthroat who will stop at nothing on the road to becoming an arrogant Master of the Universe. Like drugs, success when it’s attained is sweet; but we can never get enough, despite a spiraling search for ways to sustain the pleasure. The addict always needs a slightly larger dose to top that last high.

And yet we inevitably set goals to achieve ever greater success in a vain attempt to surpass ourselves; rarely do we take the time to enjoy the fruits of our labors. The paradox is that success demands a certain amount of discontent—healthy in proper doses, though never when that discontent turns destructive.

Hollywood is overflowing with examples of the excess that often comes wedded to success. The real-life soap operas of many of its leading figures are the stuff of Greek tragedy: After attaining fame and wealth, their lives begin to spiral out of control as they wander from one drug-rehab center to another—forever trying to one-up that initial high. Is there a purpose to all this seeking after success? Is the goal of success merely to build a bigger and brighter monument to ourselves before we die?

There are two other life questions we should ask ourselves as we go about growing our businesses. Why do I want to be successful and what will I do when I am? Only by first answering these two questions can we hope to begin charting our course.

One especially compelling figure from American business history provides us an intriguing role model.

This Scottish boy emigrated to America with his family in the middle of the 19th century, after the power loom erased his father’s job as a manual laborer. At the age of 12, he was working as a bobbin boy in a cotton factory, educating himself by reading, writing and attending night school. By age 14, he had become a messenger in a telegraph office, quickly advancing up the ranks. By just 24, he was superintendent of the mighty Pennsylvania Railroad’s Pittsburgh division. He invested heavily in railroads and traveled to Europe to sell railroad securities. By the time he was 30, his annual income was $50,000. Still, that didn’t prevent him from leaving to manage one of his investments, the Keystone Bridge Co. By 38, he had founded a steel works. Using the best technology and accounting methods available at the time, he achieved the highest efficiencies in the industry, almost single-handedly helping the U.S. to surpass England in steel production in the opening years of this century. By 65, Andrew Carnegie was earning the then-almost-unfathomable sum of $25 million per year.

What utterly separated Carnegie from other “robber barons” of that era, though, was his philanthropy. He eventually sold his empire for $250 million and spent the rest of his life systematically giving away that and many additional millions. He saw being wealthy as a duty for “the improvement of mankind,” as he put it. His famous saying that “a man who dies rich dies disgraced” stands as a glowing testament to his life, along with the nationwide teacher pension system he founded and the hundreds of libraries still standing today which were built through his astonishing generosity. His wealth, you might say, achieved a larger purpose.

Those of us who search for happiness in our possessions are destined for disappointment. The rush is fleeting, the satisfaction short-lived.

Why not try an alternate path? And you need not practice philanthropy on so grand a scale as Carnegie’s in order to derive a full measure of psychic pleasure. The next time you feel down, try visiting a nursing home and talking to someone who has no one else in life. Or perhaps volunteer to cook dinner at a homeless shelter. See if life soon begins to take on a deeper meaning.

You’ll depart from this session of service with a great feeling, and it won’t have cost you anything but a modest investment in time. And you’ll receive in emotional satisfaction several times what you gave in time and effort.

The purpose of your success, once shrouded in impenetrable fog, may well come into sharp focus as you pursue goals more meaningful than the hunt for ever-greater love of self. And you won’t have to share your little secret with anyone. You alone will know about your good deed, and that’s more than enough.

Just for a test, try it and let us know about the results.


Fred Koury is CEO of Small Business News Inc. He can be reached via e-mail at fkoury@sbnnet.com.

Monday, 22 July 2002 10:04

Why be organized?

Who do you want to be? How will you get there? These twin questions plague the success-driven. Ask yourself, where do you want to be in 10 to 20 years? Then ask, what do you have to do today to be there? Julius Caesar was 42 and the Roman Governor of Spain when, happening upon a statue of Alexander the Great, it occurred to him that the younger man had conquered the then-known world when he was 33. Caesar responded by changing his life, and the rest is history.

Planning for your future requires one important element: organization. It involves taking the various components of your life and assembling them into a systematic routine aimed toward a particular result. Absent organization, you can look forward to frustration, wasted time, poor performance and lack of perspective.

Organizing your life yields three priceless resources: time, efficiency and perspective. Everybody has the first of these. Each day contains 24 hours that can never be captured again. If the average life of a person is 73.5 years, that's 26,827 days, or 643,860 available hours.

But time is finite. When we waste it, we can't simply go back and make up for it. Like cash in the bank, it must be managed. And by managing our time, we gain control of this resource, and can accomplish more in a shorter period.

The dividend of time management is efficiency, the ability to do more with less. The wealth and ease that most people have in the United States is a direct result of increased efficiency. The evolution of the world from agricultural to industrial and now to an information age is tied to ever-increasing productivity. We thus need to look for ways to continue to increase our own productivity. Are we involved with overlapping activities with negligible rewards? Every wasted activity eliminated is time discovered to produce more results.

Perspective is the ability to form a clear view of your environment. How often have you felt so overwhelmed, only to realize that you were going in circles? The person without perspective cannot see their path. But when we can step back for a moment and consider ourselves as outsiders might, we can correct our course. The Portuguese navigators of the 14th century kept detailed log books and records of their voyages to uncharted waters. In fact, they were considered state secrets. In our life's voyage, it's only by keeping detailed records of successes and failures and the choices that brought us there that we're able to adjust our course for more profitable waters.

So where should we begin? First, take an honest look at ourselves. Three major steps will follow:

No. 1, examine every aspect of your life--work, leisure and spiritual-and make an inventory. Assess the tools you have at your disposal. What is your expertise? Who is around who might give you insight? What are your assets and liabilities? Where are you wasting time? Are you spending too much time relaxing? How much time do you spend at work? What are your work processes? Where is your work being duplicated?

No. 2, group the different parts of your life into components. Ask yourself, what is important? Then incorporate these various aspects into one central command post, sometimes called an organizer.

The Roman army was one of the most successful in history because it was one of the best-trained and best-organized ever. It was divided into divisions, or legions, of 6,000 men. These were in turn divided into cohorts, which had several centurions over various units. Through superior organization, Caesar was able to conquer the larger but less-well-organized armies of Gaul in a few years. Your organizer can likewise become a central command post from which you will be able to direct the needed resources to win the war. It should contain some lever of control over every aspect of your life.

No. 3, execute your plan of attack. Do you need to make more sales? Do you need more products? More locations? More quiet time? With a panoramic view of your personal battlefield you can begin plotting your strategy for the rest of your life.

We are only given one life, and now is the time to make it count. We can't go back and capture lost time. We can only look forward and make the time we have left count. By organizing ourselves, we can all get there.

Fred Koury is CEO of Small Business News Inc. He can be reached via e-mail at fkoury@sbnnet.com.

Monday, 22 July 2002 09:53

Everyone needs an incentive

Earlier this year, I shared a strategic plan we put in place for our company called the Go Forward Plan. It was divided into four parts: product plan, market plan, financial plan and people plan.

The theme for our people plan is, “Don’t worry, be happy,” and our goal is to create a fun environment for all employees. In a time when the economy is booming and unemployment is at its lowest point in 29 years, your people are your most valuable asset. We decided it was time to differentiate ourselves from other employers in a number of ways.

The first step was not to reinvent the wheel, but to find a company that was doing this successfully. After doing some research, the company that came up over and over again was Walt Disney World. It is regarded in its industry as a leader in motivation through its employee programs.

Walt Disney World has 180 recognition and incentive programs, according to Bob Nelson, author of “1001 Ways to Energize Your Employees.” You may ask yourself if that is overkill. Disney doesn’t think so. It is looking for more. One employee was asked, “Have you helped to bring anyone else to work here?” His reply was 12 people.

Not only is this person doing his day job as a food server, he is acting as a recruiter. When asked what incentives the company uses to motivate him, they ranged from a “shining star” name tag to public praise in meetings. Others included being named in the company newsletter, dinner for two at a nice restaurant, a reserved parking space and the spirit of F.R.E.D. award — a miniature Mickey Mouse statue which stands for Friendly, Resourceful, Enthusiastic and Dependable. Surprisingly, money wasn’t even mentioned. After reviewing several other success stories, it was time to implement our own plan.

The next thing we did was meet with the majority of our people by department and find out their personal, professional and financial goals. We decided that in order to know what motivates our people, we needed to ask them. We gave people a platform to be heard. After filtering the feedback, we had enough information to move forward with our people plan.

Our plan was divided into three separate parts:

n Establish a results-oriented culture.

The idea was to develop quarterly plans for each department. In doing so, everyone has clear expectations as to what role they play in the company with a built-in accountability mechanism. Next, we decided to implement an incentive and reward program based on key performance measures tied into their specific goals. Incentives could include cash bonuses, trips, awards, gift certificates and time off. We found this twofold approach meets our goals for our overall go forward plan as well as our people plan.

  • Develop the full potential of each employee.

    Our goal here is to provide and implement ongoing training for all employees on a yearly basis. This could consist of internal and external training programs.

  • Improve employee understanding of business fundamentals.

    We will share key performance measures on a regular basis with the entire company. Our people need to be educated in all areas of the business to make the greatest impact. Fundamentals include revenues, staffing levels, number of advertisers, advertising market share, advertiser satisfaction, product quality, reader satisfaction, reader request levels, community involvement and employee satisfaction.

We immediately noticed a change in attitude of our employees when implementing our plan and look forward to the rewards for the company to follow. Everyone needs an incentive. Most companies don’t really focus on their employees until it’s too late. Remember, employees will never treat a customer better than they are being treated themselves.

Monday, 22 July 2002 09:47

Building momentum

After receiving an overwhelming and enthusiastic response to last month’s column entitled “Join the PAC: Politics can make or break your business,” a number of readers have decided they would like to move forward with the formation of a Political Action Committee dedicated to electing truly pro-business candidates on the local, state and national scene.

As I described last month, a PAC is an independent organization, the primary purpose of which is to support or oppose candidates, political parties or ballot issues. It is more financially flexible than independent campaign donations, allowing groups of people to pool their resources, educate voters on issues that may affect them and support likeminded candidates for political office.

It will be the goal of this new PAC to act as an advocate for pro-business issues, with a motto of “We are in the business of helping business succeed.” The organizers of the PAC have set a goal of raising $250,000 during the next six months. As a reader and a business person, you will read more about the PAC in its own newsletter, paid for by the PAC and contained in future issues of SBN.

If we all pool our resources, we can have a much greater impact on the whole. Listed below is a breakdown of how the PAC hopes to make its $250,000 goal.

Levels

5@ $5,000 $25,000

50@ $2,500 $125,000

50@ $1,000 $50,000

50@ $500 $25,000

50@ $100 $5,000

200@ $50 $10,000

250@ $25 $5,000

500@ $10 $5,000

There will be different levels of participation to help the PAC meet its goals, but each and every donation, regardless of amount, is important. This is an opportunity to stand up and be counted. Together, you can bring business issues to the forefront of the political arena.

Several committees are being contemplated with regard to the PAC’s formation. If this is something that you would like to be more actively involved with, please let us know. It is the intention of the PAC to make this something that readers and business people can be involved in at every level. I am pleased that the organizers of the PAC have adopted many of the goals that I set forth in last month’s editorial, including:

  • Raising and donating money to political candidates who are truly pro-business, who have demonstrated their commitment to a pro-business agenda by their actions, including voting records, candidates’ questionnaires and by members of the PAC who can vouch for their pro-business agendas.

  • Creating a new voice for business owners and leaders to bring attention and focus on the issues that affect them.

  • Educating members of the Political Action Committee about issues that may affect their businesses and the politicians who have a direct influence on corresponding legislation.

  • Bringing about change to help businesses grow and prosper.

    Synergy is where the sum of the parts is greater than the whole. I know each one of us gets asked to do a lot of things, but I hope you will consider creating a stronger political voice a priority. When the Political Action Committee is formed, the organizers will let you know where contributions to the PAC can be sent. Look for that information in the PAC’s first newsletter, coming soon.

    Fred Koury (fkoury@sbnnet.com) is president and CEO of SBN.

Monday, 22 July 2002 09:40

Who do you trust?

In God We Trust — All Others Pay Cash.” The amusing sign in the delicatessen caught my eye and started me thinking — What place does God have in the marketplace today?

Ohio is the most recent state to come under attack for references to God. A challenge to the 6th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals to remove the phrase “With God all things are possible” as the official state motto for Ohio, suggests just one more step in the process of removing any mention of deity in our lives.

The first step is removing God from our government and schools. Will the next step be to remove God from our businesses? Will faith be outlawed as a guiding principle in our daily affairs as religious references are erased from public view?

In our rapidly changing, high-tech culture, we are so crowded with our own inventions that we have no need for dependence on, nor accountability to, a Supreme Being. But can success, material wealth and power give ultimate meaning to our lives? In our shift from the spiritual to a more secular world view, our appeal to higher standards of love, virtue, compassion and positive traits in general have lost their point of reference.

There is a growing sense of frustration that achieving The American Dream does not fulfill our deeper longings. We spend years building businesses, growing market share and watching the bottom line. After years of struggling to climb a mountain of obstacles, we get to the top, only to realize that success can be an empty feeling.

We have it all, but we are not satisfied.

Peggy Noonen, former speech writer for Presidents Ronald Reagan and George Bush, spoke about our national spiritual crisis in the Sept. 14, 1992, issue of Forbes magazine: “ ... We are beginning to lose God — banishing Him from the scene, from our consciousness, losing the assumption He was part of the deity drama or its Maker.

“And it is a terrible thing when people lose God. Life is difficult and people are afraid, and to be without God is to lose man’s great source of consolation and coherence.”

From Moses to Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn have come dire warnings of the consequences of a nation that forgets God. Without God, our business endeavors have no reason or meaning. It becomes a game of wealth accumulation and power struggles.

Some will demand evidence before allowing God to guide their daily affairs, but there are compelling reasons that a belief in a Supreme Being is not so farfetched. Consider:

  • The “outer” evidence. Look at the order, beauty and intricate design of nature. Could all of this happen by chance or accident? I think not, any more than an explosion in a print shop could result in a book of poetry!

    Abraham Lincoln said, “All that I see teaches me to believe in a God that I do not see.”

  • The “inner” evidence: The inner longing of every human being to be loved and to express love, to know truth and the desire for peace — where do these come from? A higher being? To come to the realization that we are created for a purpose will influence our personal, family and business worlds. The more we seek to be in a right relationship with God, the more we come into right relationships with our fellow human beings.

It will pervade every area of our lives as we remember that in all matters — however, great or small — it is “In God We Trust.”

Fred Koury (fkoury@sbnnet.com) is president and CEO of SBN.