U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Juan E. Rose III lets his military experience provide perspective when considering the task of balancing work, school and family life.

A student in the Executive MBA program at the UCLA Anderson School of Management, Rose’s leadership qualities earned him a John Wooden Global Leadership Award Fellowship. At the award ceremony, he was asked how he manages his busy schedule.

“When I met Pepsi CEO Indra Nooyi, she said, ‘You’re a Marine on active duty in San Diego, you go to an Executive MBA program in Los Angeles and you have a family in Murrieta, Calif. How do you do this?’ I commute 40,000 miles a year and I’m working hard and learning every single minute. But my Marines and I are not getting shot at, so it’s OK,” Rose says.

Smart Business spoke with Rose about the MBA program and how it’s helped prepare him for entering the business world when he leaves military service.

Why did you enter the MBA program?

After 10 years of active duty, I’m looking to transition to the private sector and I’m using the MBA program to couple the leadership experience I have with more technical knowledge.

I’m a financial management officer in the Marine Corps; however, finance in the private sector is for-profit, levering debt, and managing, maintaining and acquiring assets. As a government-certified defense financial manager (CDFM), I’m more preoccupied with safeguarding and disbursing public funds, while accomplishing the mission with minimal resources. Profit is never a conversation we have.

How does the profit motive change things?

Profit stresses people in completely different ways. I’ve been afforded the opportunity to work as a consultant recently, and I’ve been working with a couple of clients as a student. I am learning every day that people manage risk in order to maximize profit; Marines manage risk in order to save lives. It still seems to me that if you focus on your employees — an invaluable asset — while managing risk, profit maximization will be a result.

To me, profit just changes the perspective. When you’re managing life or death situations, losing money is not as important. As a leader you can then focus on learning from the mistakes to ensure you and your team don’t allow that to happen again. The complexity of defense financial management in the military comes from the environment and the mission, not the application of financial assets.

When you start using debt and trying to maximize profit at all costs, there are a lot of strategies and different ways to do that. That’s what I am trying to obtain from the MBA program and so far it’s exceeding all of my initial expectations.

What type of job will you seek after graduation?

I’m leaning toward management consulting. It will give me the opportunity to work in teams and continue to learn about industry as a whole in several different arenas.

It’s important for me to bring value to a company that values its people and affords them the opportunity to be intellectually challenged. My No. 1 priority is to work in a company that gives back somehow.

My long-term goal is to be a professor and to continue to coach, mentor and inspire people. The most important part of what I’ve accomplished over the past 10 years is coaching, mentoring and inspiring Marines to exceed their own expectations.

I look at some of our professors who sacrifice and take time to do that for us. They are able to manage their professional aspirations and personal lives, while also continuing to educate us. That’s what I’m passionate about — paying forward what was done for me.

Juan E. Rose III is a MBA candidate at UCLA Anderson School of Management. Reach him at (760) 458-7408 or juan.rose.2013@anderson.ucla.edu.

Insights Executive Education is brought to you by UCLA Anderson School of Management

 

Published in Los Angeles

A true leader realizes he has flaws. Before he can be a leader he has to fix them.

The problem is never the other person; it’s you.

Many people I have mentored love to play the “victim.” “If only this hadn’t happened to me.” Or, “If this person hadn’t done this to me, everything would be better.”

One way to work on yourself is to hire a personal coach. Several years ago, I hired a personal coach, and it changed my life significantly.

My personal coach helped me “step out of my life” and think about things from a different angle. He helped me improve both my personal and professional relationships.

I met with him once a week until I felt as if I could utilize the structure and support he provided on my own.

In a sense, it was very much like seeing a therapist. My personal coach encouraged me to read books I would have never thought about reading, opening up entirely new perspectives on life. We would discuss how the themes in the books applied to me. He made me think about how I led.

I learned that you control how you think, act, and feel. When you’re in rush hour traffic and running late, who is to blame? Not the traffic ? you chose to leave during rush hour.

Define ‘being in charge’

“Control” doesn’t mean you should be controlling.

To gain total control of your leadership abilities, you don’t need a single best-selling author to tell you how. You already have total control over the process; you just need to let go of the control.

Somehow that doesn’t sound like the big idea for us perfectionists and Type A achievers, does it? Letting go sounds a little weak and threatening. That’s because what we’re really talking about here is vulnerability.

Interestingly, when you let yourself be truly seen, revealing your heart and soul ? and insecurities, lack of knowledge, prowess, certainty, whatever — what you truly gain is the power to be comfortable. And being comfortable to be yourself radiates security. It’s true. Vulnerability is amazing. People pick up on it like magnets.

What’s more, when you feel comfortable in your own skin, you do a much better job at work, at home, and in your personal life. Let go of control and let yourself be truly seen. Transparency is wonderful.

Practice being fallible

To one likes being wrong. When we were younger, we all considered leaders such as our president, parents, teachers or ministers to be infallible. But being an authority or a leader isn’t a person who is always right. In fact, being always right is impossible. There is no such animal.

A true leader — the real authority ? is a person (or institution) who has a process for lowering the likelihood that they are wrong to acceptably low levels.

Taking this to a level of reality and openness in your workplace, how do you accomplish this? Can those around you let you know when you are going down the wrong path? Do you think this is the case, or do you have the systems in place to make sure this is true?

If you haven’t been called on a decision you’ve made or something you’ve said in more than a month, chances are good that you haven’t made it clear to your colleagues you will be occasionally, absolutely wrong. Those you lead need to know you are counting on them to let you know when they disagree, and that you will be ready to hear their opinions.

Being wrong can be right

Be open to being wrong. This is vitally important to manage effectively. Those you work with will value your leadership and authority even more when they know this is the case.

Force yourself into uncomfortable situations. The only way you will ever expand your horizons is to expand your comfort zone.

If a situation is uncomfortable for you, acknowledge it. Say, “I’m really nervous about bringing up this issue. I’ve been worrying about it for days.” You’ll be surprised how the other person reacts.

As author Seth Godin said, “You can’t have success unless you’re prepared to have failure.”

A wise friend once told me to do what you fear. It will be your best ally.

David Harding is president and CEO of HardingPoorman Group, a locally owned and operated graphic communications firm in Indianapolis consisting of several integrated companies all under one roof. The Indiana Chamber of Commerce has voted the company as one of the “Best Places to Work” in Indiana. Harding can be reached at dharding@hardingpoorman.com. For more information, go to www.hardingpoorman.com.

Published in Indianapolis

When Hittle Landscaping Inc. lost 30 percent of its revenue during the recent housing market crash, President Jeremy Hittle had some difficult decisions to make. The first one was how to bring the $10.4 million family-owned company out of the funk. That took teamwork and some painful choices.

But equally as tough was to decide whether or not to hire a pricey leadership coach who could teach the Hittle management team the skills needed for long-term prosperity.

“It was expensive and it was difficult to spend the money in times like those, but it had to be done,” Hittle says.

“When the housing market crashed, we had to react to it quickly. Getting the upper management team together to fight the fight was a lot better than me just fighting it myself.”

The decision to hire an executive coach often requires considerable discussion. A business must tie it to an analysis of expenses, how to increase revenue and how to increase efficiency.

“You need to discuss what’s a better way to manage your business, manage your people, manage your customers,” Hittle says. “The lists will get very long and very hard to manage. How can you ask the employees to work harder? You can, but what’s that going to get you? So better leadership skills are a great way to improve efficiency, morale and communications. That’s where efficiencies come from. Efficiencies don’t just come from working harder.”

Hittle asked consultants to suggest a coach, and he hired one who had also written a book on leadership. Weekly and biweekly sessions helped the management team set goals and provided different ways to think about situations.

“It really makes a difference,” Hittle says. “There is a lot of frustration today in leadership. Frustration just doesn’t help. It’s kind of like carrying around baggage when you’re trying to be a leader.”

The personal leadership development benefits can be significant.

“It’s been great. It’s fascinating when a person does decide to consider his own leadership style, develop upon that and grow on what he’s found,” Hittle says. “I know it’s been huge for me, and I have had several employees step back and say, ‘Wow, I better understand my job now. It’s not just to tell people what to do. It’s about being supportive. It’s about accepting better who you’re managing.’”

The term “supportive” is a key operative word that is stressed in the leadership sessions.

“Employees need to know how valuable they are to the organization,” Hittle says. “You don’t want them to feel like they are employees ? you want them to feel like business owners. They all should feel like they have their own small business that they run beneath them. They feel like those beneath them are the employees that they employ, that they support, encourage and direct.”

That support helped the company reclaim 60 to 70 percent of the revenues that were lost and racked up near-record profitability for 2010.

Compassion is another focal point of leadership training.

“Listening, understanding what they want, and giving it to them,” Hittle says. “It’s not being a leader by directive. That’s not what to shoot for. Shoot for trying to nourish their needs, and your needs become their needs.

“A lot of leaders don’t quite understand it because they just want to have the first and the last say-so, and they expect it to be done that way. I don’t believe that works very well.

“Usually people that excel to a leadership position are firm-minded thinkers,” Hittle says. “They don’t realize that you have to open up, be a little vulnerable, and ask for some help and do some self development ? to try to pass along the message that we can all be better.”

How to reach: Hittle Landscaping Inc., (317) 896-5697 or www.hittlelandscape.com

Trimming and pruning

With a significant portion of its business tied to the housing industry, when the market hit bottom in 2009, Jeremy Hittle and his management team had their plates full learning how to be better leaders while they trimmed and pruned Hittle Landscaping’s operations to weather the storm.

“It was my job to not give direction but to convey a message,” says Hittle, president of the 140-employee company.

“The message was that we are in trouble, and we need everybody's help. I spent a lot of time in 2009 making sure that nobody thought otherwise. I tried to make sure that they knew that the company’s challenges were their challenges ? that we were all in it together.”

The solution was plain and simple: Everyone needed to be in concert and do some brainstorming.

“The only possible way to get out of a downturn like that was to come up with 50 ways that would help,” Hittle says.

“Obviously we had to lay off some employees, and we changed things around,” Hittle says. “Nobody worked any overtime. We worked four days a week instead of five. We saved on travel.”

Steps taken to recover from the downturn are lessons that likely will be retained.

“We are constantly working on reorganization. Even today, it’s about how we are going to change today to deal with tomorrow, just like we did back in 2009.”

How to reach: Hittle Landscaping Inc., (317) 896-5697 or www.hittlelandscape.com

Published in Indianapolis

When Hittle Landscaping Inc. lost 30 percent of its revenue during the recent housing market crash, President Jeremy Hittle had some difficult decisions to make. The first one was how to bring the $10.4 million family-owned company out of the funk. That took teamwork and some painful choices.

But equally as tough was to decide whether or not to hire a pricey leadership coach who could teach the Hittle management team the skills needed for long-term prosperity.

“It was expensive and it was difficult to spend the money in times like those, but it had to be done,” Hittle says.

“When the housing market crashed, we had to react to it quickly. Getting the upper management team together to fight the fight was a lot better than me just fighting it myself.”

The decision to hire an executive coach often requires considerable discussion. A business must tie it to an analysis of expenses, how to increase revenue and how to increase efficiency.

“You need to discuss what’s a better way to manage your business, manage your people, manage your customers,” Hittle says. “The lists will get very long and very hard to manage. How can you ask the employees to work harder? You can, but what’s that going to get you? So better leadership skills are a great way to improve efficiency, morale and communications. That’s where efficiencies come from. Efficiencies don’t just come from working harder.”

Hittle asked consultants to suggest a coach, and he hired one who had also written a book on leadership. Weekly and biweekly sessions helped the management team set goals and provided different ways to think about situations.

“It really makes a difference,” Hittle says. “There is a lot of frustration today in leadership. Frustration just doesn’t help. It’s kind of like carrying around baggage when you’re trying to be a leader.”

The personal leadership development benefits can be significant.

“It’s been great. It’s fascinating when a person does decide to consider his own leadership style, develop upon that and grow on what he’s found,” Hittle says. “I know it’s been huge for me, and I have had several employees step back and say, ‘Wow, I better understand my job now. It’s not just to tell people what to do. It’s about being supportive. It’s about accepting better who you’re managing.’”

The term “supportive” is a key operative word that is stressed in the leadership sessions.

“Employees need to know how valuable they are to the organization,” Hittle says. “You don’t want them to feel like they are employees ? you want them to feel like business owners. They all should feel like they have their own small business that they run beneath them. They feel like those beneath them are the employees that they employ, that they support, encourage and direct.”

That support helped the company reclaim 60 to 70 percent of the revenues that were lost and racked up near-record profitability for 2010.

Compassion is another focal point of leadership training.

“Listening, understanding what they want, and giving it to them,” Hittle says. “It’s not being a leader by directive. That’s not what to shoot for. Shoot for trying to nourish their needs, and your needs become their needs.

“A lot of leaders don’t quite understand it because they just want to have the first and the last say-so, and they expect it to be done that way. I don’t believe that works very well.

“Usually people that excel to a leadership position are firm-minded thinkers,” Hittle says. “They don’t realize that you have to open up, be a little vulnerable, and ask for some help and do some self development ? to try to pass along the message that we can all be better.”

How to reach: Hittle Landscaping Inc., (317) 896-5697 or www.hittlelandscape.com

Trimming and pruning

With a significant portion of its business tied to the housing industry, when the market hit bottom in 2009, Jeremy Hittle and his management team had their plates full learning how to be better leaders while they trimmed and pruned Hittle Landscaping’s operations to weather the storm.

“It was my job to not give direction but to convey a message,” says Hittle, president of the 140-employee company.

“The message was that we are in trouble, and we need everybody's help. I spent a lot of time in 2009 making sure that nobody thought otherwise. I tried to make sure that they knew that the company’s challenges were their challenges ? that we were all in it together.”

The solution was plain and simple: Everyone needed to be in concert and do some brainstorming.

“The only possible way to get out of a downturn like that was to come up with 50 ways that would help,” Hittle says.

“Obviously we had to lay off some employees, and we changed things around,” Hittle says. “Nobody worked any overtime. We worked four days a week instead of five. We saved on travel.”

Steps taken to recover from the downturn are lessons that likely will be retained.

“We are constantly working on reorganization. Even today, it’s about how we are going to change today to deal with tomorrow, just like we did back in 2009.”

How to reach: Hittle Landscaping Inc., (317) 896-5697 or www.hittlelandscape.com

Published in Indianapolis