Archive Search

Advanced Search

Search results
Friday, 25 April 2008 20:00

The Riney file

Written by
Born: Kirkwood, Mo. Education: Bachelor of science degree, civil engineering; master’s degree in business administration, University of Missouri Riney on starting a business: I think a good rule is never underestimate how long it’s going to take for a business to get off the ground and be successful. Always have probably twice the money set aside that you thought you needed, maybe three times as much, in case things don’t progress as planned. Most of us are too optimistic about our ability and about the public’s reaction to whatever service we’re going to provide them. Riney on patience: If it…
Wednesday, 26 March 2008 20:00

See you in court

Written by
Contracts are drawn up and signed so that all parties are protected and expectations on both sides are spelled out. However, sometimes all those involved may not be happy with the outcome of a project and decide to take the matter to court. Are there subtle red flags that may warn of litigation on the horizon? “Usually, there are red flags, but they are more than just subtle,” says Ed Goldenhersh, a litigation attorney, officer and general counsel for Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale, P.C. “There are some subtleties that you may not pick up, but red flags should be identified.”…
Wednesday, 26 March 2008 20:00

Cost or benefit?

Written by
How well do you really know the business processes that are driving forces behind your financial statements? Your organization has systems for shipping orders, collecting customer payments, buying materials from distributors — and all these systems work to your knowledge. But do you have controls in place to test their efficacy? With new changes issued by the Auditing Standards Board, effective as of Dec. 31, 2007, public accounting firms must approach audits of nonpublic entities with a sharper eye on controls. Auditors can no longer automatically default to substantive auditing methods — where they only document a general understanding of…
What does being a “team player” really mean? The phrase has been worn threadbare in corporate America, but nonetheless, it is an important characteristic among employees in order for a business to run smoothly and successfully. While the term refers to, essentially, honoring obligations and being supportive to co-workers, the aspect of meeting deadlines appears to be the most important characteristic according to a national poll conducted by Accountemps, a temporary staffing firm for accounting and finance professionals owned by Robert Half International. “Today’s workplace requires a high level of collaboration and cooperation among employees,” says Lisa Schneider, branch manager…
Sunday, 24 February 2008 19:00

The Clark file

Written by
Born: Miami Education: University of Georgia, bachelor of arts, journalism What is the biggest business challenge you have faced? I’ve had two. My early years starting out in the retail business. I’m a petite person, and I’m female. Getting people to take seriously that I wanted to rise up the ladder and run an operating division some day and be a success (was a challenge). Over time, my results proved that I was capable of that. When I left my job as the president of Payless ShoeSource Inc. to start Build-A-Bear, it was getting people to take the concept of…
Tuesday, 29 January 2008 19:00

Blocking and tackling

Written by
Although CEOs tend to overuse the phrase “building a team” to explain their stance on collaboration, Bill Shreffler takes the analogy to a new level as president and CEO of Broadstripe. In an effort to foster healthy competition and keep Broadstripe’s vision and culture alive and visible, Shreffler has organized a sort of organizationwide customer satisfaction fantasy football league. The system, which uses football terminology and is based on key performance indicators, has been successful for Shreffler in other organizations, and he says the results have been no less positive at Broadstripe, which posted 2006 revenue of about $100 million.…
Tuesday, 29 January 2008 19:00

Building trust

Written by
If you work for Bob Shallenberger, you’d better be able to think for yourself. Shallenberger, who runs Highland Homes Inc. with his partner, John Cavanagh, gives his employees full autonomy, and once the goal is set, he doesn’t want to have to OK your plan to accomplish it. “I might do that for my 9-year-old children, not for a project manager,” he says. The founding partners’ goal was not to become billionaires but to build the best company they could. And in doing so, they’ve grown Highland Homes from a $4 million company in 2004 to 2006 revenue of $16.5…
Wednesday, 26 December 2007 19:00

The orientation advantage

Written by
When initiating an employee into a corporation, it’s ideal for the new hire to begin contributing as soon as possible. But, is the corporation giving its new hire the resources needed to effectively bring his or her skills to the table? Amidst simple introductions and training, there’s an opportunity for a company to provide a formal orientation on its procedures, policies and culture that can more seamlessly let a new employee hit the ground running.“Orientation helps new employees become more comfortable in their new environment, which, in the long run, is going to lead to them contributing more quickly,” says …
Page 5 of 5