Archive Search

Advanced Search

Search results
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:48

A computerized revolution

Written by
John Chambers is considered a Titan of the digital world. Under his watch as president and CEO of Cisco Systems Inc., revenue for the worldwide leader of Internet networking products grew from $1.2 billion to more than $14 billion, with 80 percent of those sales coming through e-commerce over the Web. By the year 2003, Chambers estimates Cisco Systems’ online sales will top $20 billion. For anyone still doubting the Web’s effect on business, Chambers says it is time to wake up. The Internet isn’t going to merely play a role in business, it’s going to change everything you think…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:48

Wrangling with a giant

Written by
Vince Piscitello was at a job site last year when his office called with word of a hefty rebate check, in the mid-five figures, from the Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation. “I said, ‘What? Go to the bank right away!’” to deposit it and begin earning interest. His company’s good fortune was part of a larger windfall for Ohio employers, who received about $2 billion in rebates in 1998 from the long-suffering agency. This year, however, the money being returned to employers is considerably less: about $630 million in what are being called not rebates but dividends (the proceeds of…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:48

Virtual networking

Written by
Biztravelclub.com, a new online service, promises to turn travel downtime into an opportunity to forge new business contacts. Members can post their business trip itinerary, interests and messages, while gaining access to the contact details of others in town during that time and a report on potential networking possibilities. The site also includes a reference section that offers travelers everything from weather reports to subway maps. “The club can be anything a business traveler wants it to be,” says William Richards, creator of www.biztravelclub.com. “For example, it can provide an opportunity to ‘overview’ who is doing what and where within…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:48

The real bottom line

Written by
There is an element to a successful business that is hard to quantify but undeniably important to the bottom line. Its impact is felt most in hard times rather than good ones. And, its greatest impact occurs when no return on the investment is sought. What is this mysterious ingredient to a solid business? It’s simply social responsibility, a company giving back to the communities it serves through volunteerism, pro bono efforts and financial support. Its dividend is what many in the business world believe is a company’s most important asset — a good reputation. It reflects the kind of…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:48

The employee friendly office

Written by
As your company has grown, your cubicles have gotten smaller. The IT team has laid down so much new wire you could serve as a back-up should the nation’s electric grid shut down at midnight Jan. 1. And that chair, you know, the one with the fabric tear where the padding fell out so many times it was finally replaced with a couple of T-shirts and someone’s dirty sweat socks? It’s seen more rear ends than a proctologist. The bottom line: It’s time to relocate and to refurnish the office. You’re not a start-up anymore, and that desk you got…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:47

Pillars of society

Written by
There’s no question that companies that give back to the communities which support them find their generosity and thoughtfulness returned exponentially. This ability to give without asking for anything in return is a gesture worthy of recognition. This year’s 11 Medical Mutual Pillar Award for Community Service winners exemplify this ability, putting their own twist on unique ways to give back. The winners will be honored Dec. 2 at the second annual Pillar Award banquet at Executive Caterers of Landerhaven, sponsored by Medical Mutual of Ohio, Xerox Connect and APKNet. This year’s group joins an elite list of winners, which…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:47

Obesity bias

Written by
Search There are many factors that may affect a hiring decision, including ones that, by law, are not supposed to be considered, such as race or sex. But there are other biases that may creep into a decision as well, including a bias against an obese person. SBN talked to Paula Popovich, an industrial psychologist at Ohio University, who has studied this topic. Q: Is an obese person less likely to get a job than an average-sized person? A: There is evidence of stereotyped beliefs and discriminatory behaviors against the obese in the workplace. Some is anecdotal and some is…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:47

Making the grade

Written by
Last year, Lubrizol Corp. decided to adopt an urban school district, with plans to dispatch volunteers to help students with subjects such as math and science, a seemingly good fit for the Wickliffe chemical company. Then it discovered a more pressing problem. When Lubrizol Manager of Corporate Administration Le’Joyce Naylor contacted the Euclid City Schools to pitch the program, officials were thrilled, but mentioned where they really needed help was with improving the reading skills of several third-grade students. Helping the children improve their skills was a necessity because of new proficiency tests on the horizon for fourth graders. Starting…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:47

In-house solution

Written by
Health care is a difficult benefit to manage in any business. It’s expensive and complex to administer, and switching plans usually means complaints from employees as they may have to switch doctors. When a service that’s intended to be a benefit becomes a concern, productivity and morale fall. That’s why some employers have taken health care into their own hands. These businesses, mostly bigger operations with a large employee base, are building their own health clinics and contracting directly with physicians to provide services on-site. These health centers offer occupational health care as well as primary care. In some cases,…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:47

He practiced what he preaches

Written by
Search “Like a photographer trying to take a perfect picture, an entrepreneur must learn very quickly that focus is everything.” The opening sentence of a research paper David Deeds once co-authored in the Journal of Business Venturing suggests that Deeds has more than a passing familiarity with the challenges of running one’s own company. Indeed, during the 1980s, Deeds and his older brother Corky established and then ran a San Diego computer systems-integration company, Light Speed Corp., which they built into a reasonably successful organization before David left to attend graduate school in Seattle. Like most start-ups, the one begun…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:47

Excellence under the sun

Written by
The evening was filled with anticipation and delivery, the air literally teeming with energy from the combination of laser lights, rock music and video presentations. Then Gregory K. Erickson, director of entrepreneurial services for Ernst & Young, cranked it up even further by uttering four words: “Ladies and gentleman, Riverdance.” With a blast of traditional Irish music, several members of the renowned dance team leapt onto the stage, exhilarating the crowd of entrepreneurs and their spouses. The troupe’s performance was a gift from the Irish contingent of EOY winners, and it was only the beginning. Denny Dent and his “two-fisted…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:47

Designing hopes

Written by
If you’ve received holiday cards over the past few years from the Salvation Army, Greater Cleveland Literacy Coalition, Cleveland Sight Center or the Alzheimer’s Association, you’ve probably seen Marcus Advertising’s work. That’s because each year, the Beachwood-based advertising agency leverages its expertise to design cards which assist nonprofit organizations, solicit donations and round up volunteers. “It helps bring professionalism to not-for-profit organizations which are competing in a very competitive environment for money, attention and volunteers,” says President Harvey Scholnick. “If you can help them have a more professional and exciting look, it suddenly becomes an organization that more people pay…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:47

Coaching your employees

Written by
Search When his team suffered a loss on the basketball court, Michael Friedman was shattered, often mulling over the game in his mind long after the final buzzer sounded. It was during those early years of coaching that Friedman noticed his players were often less discouraged about their performance than he was. “We would lose a game and I would be demoralized,” recalls Friedman, founder and owner of Captain Tony’s Pizza and Pasta Emporium. “I would be devastated, while my players would shower up and go party with their girlfriends. I wondered how come they didn’t get upset. “I learned…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:47

Art of illusion

Written by
Bob Leon had seen everything. At least that’s what the president and owner of Colortone Audio Visual Staging and Rentals thought before he was hired in 1995 to stage a program for News America Corp. on Marco Island, Fla. After all, Leon had toured as a roadie with the Allman Brothers Band and Billy Joel during the 1970s, where he experienced first hand the chaotic rock and roll lifestyle. “One of my jobs for the Allmans was running out on stage between songs to pour shots for the guys,” he recalls with a devilish smile. If you look closely at…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:47

A gift for the future

Written by
Unicare Corp. understands the power of giving. Executives there know that urging their employees to tutor grade school students can change the lives of both the children and their workers. In fact, Unicare pays each of its employees to spend a portion of their week volunteering in the community. As a health care reimbursement company, Unicare comes in contact with many people who need help in its everyday business dealings. The company often helps find health care coverage for the uninsured and assistance for the hungry or poor through local organizations. In 1993, it established a nonprofit organization to take…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:46

Ups and Downs

Written by
(Ups) to the stock market. After a rocky start early last year, the market rebounded and soared, mirroring the robust economy and giving new life to the old phrase, “You can’t keep a good man down.” SBN’s advice: Ride it as long as you can. (Downs) to computer viruses, which got meaner and more destructive as the year progressed. One of the nastiest was W95.Babylonia, which came disguised as a Y2K fix and spread through ‘Net chat rooms. This makes us wonder about the future of cybersubterfuge. Will we one day log on to the ‘Net and watch our computers…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:46

The relationship equation

Written by
In the early 1990s, contact management software was popular among sales people, who used it to keep organized. It spawned an industry known as sales force automation. Around the same time, business leaders heard the cries of marketers demanding that customer data be extracted from accounting systems on the company’s mainframe. That led to database marketing automation, which also enjoyed success. Today, almost a decade later, most companies with very large customer bases, sales forces or complex integrated marketing programs have invested in automation. Smaller companies have been more cautious and less successful. Now there’s a new trend — sales,…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:46

Surfing to prosperity

Written by
It may not be terribly surprising that the United States is blowing away both Europe and Japan in terms of computer ownership and Internet access, and economists David Altig and Peter Rupert argue that the figures are prime indicators of how well a country’s economy is suited to absorb new technology. In a commentary recently published by the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, Altig and Rupert report that 45 percent of households in the United States own a personal computer. In Europe, that drops to 23 percent and falls to 17 percent in Japan. There is an even bigger disparity…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:46

Recipe for success

Written by
Most of us at one time have watched Oprah Winfrey or Jerry Springer. Believe it or not, your leadership style probably resembles one or the other. Both have growing and profitable businesses, are competitive, hard working, persistent, and believe strongly in the social causes that impact their lives. This, however, is where the similarities end. A pinch of Oprah Oprah views her show as a teaching tool that presents positive role models and what is right with the world. She believes that while we are learning, growing and taking responsibility for our own lives, we can serve as inspirational leaders…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:46

Net effect

Written by
With nearly every business laying out their e-commerce strategy, Yesterday Corp. President Tom Sincharge says too many business owners look at the Internet as a cure to whatever ails their companies. “I remember how many rushed to the Internet to sell products before realizing it was best used as a way to keep your own clients rather than generate new ones,” he says. When he first looked at the Internet as his company’s main communication tool, he wondered if his workers would buy into abandoning their telephones and fax machines to embrace the company’s intranet. He wondered if it would…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:46

Lawyer in a can

Written by
There is a statistic floating around that claims you are three times more likely to be hauled into court than stay overnight at your local hospital. Although it may be just another sign of our litigious times, it is also the statistic legal insurance providers quickly roll out when asked why their industry has experienced such a boom in the past several years. For those unfamiliar with the concept, legal insurance is similar to an HMO in the health care industry. It first became available in the United States when Oklahoma-based Pre-Paid Legal Services Inc. set up shop in 1972.…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:46

Handle with care

Written by
I have a friend who was convinced that Y2K spelled the end of the world. For years, he warned me to take precautions for the catastrophic events that were sure to accompany the changeover from 1999 to 2000. “You’d better not have anything stored on your computer that you want to keep,” he said, “It’ll disappear come Jan. 1, 2000. Mark my words, all hell will break loose.” My typical response was to shrug and assure him I would be prepared. Well, if you’re reading this in the confines of your comfortable office, it’s safe to assume my friend wasn’t…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:46

Bells and whistles

Written by
There were countless products all making the same promises: Get driving directions, check e-mail and make travel reservations on the way to the airport. The novelty was gripping, but Tom Sincharge needed to figure out whether any of these products was worth buying. “Sure, I’d liked to check sports scores on the fly, but that’s not a big perk when looking for a way to increase employee productivity,” says Sincharge, president of Yesterday Corp. “I really questioned whether any of these products could offer the solid Internet connection we needed.” After weeding through countless Web pages and promotional brochures, Sincharge…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:46

A Woodstock for kids

Written by
It was the phone call Beth Kohn knew might come one day and dreaded. Kohn, a children’s entertainment event producer, had devoted countless hours to developing a musical program that was to be part of a huge, month-long children’s festival in Atlanta, Ga. Her show, Kidstock, patterned after the generational icon Woodstock, was so successful that while it was being staged, national media organizations took note. It landed Kohn’s event in Billboard magazine. For Kohn, it appeared her biggest worries would be selling tie-dyed T-shirts and coordinating the musicians’ schedules for the remainder of Kidstock’s run. But the event’s success…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:46

Don’t follow this advice

Written by
Companies are working overtime to put in place intranets, local networks set up within a company for employees; and extranets, internal computer networks available to select outside users. But in their haste to get some system — any system — in place, many aren’t considering all the angles. To help you get it right the first time, here are 10 common misperceptions and mistakes to avoid making in setting up your company’s intranets and extranets. 1. It’s all in how it looks. The actual content doesn’t really matter. “Content is king,” says Sam Keller, CEO of Kelltech, an Independence-based company…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:45

Wired for the future

Written by
There are people who buy automobiles from John Honiotes without ever straying far from the warm glow of their personal computers. Instead, they visit Autonation USA’s Web site, browse through digital pictures of Hondas, Volkswagens and Chevrolets, and, if they wish, have one delivered to their home for a test drive. Then, if they like what they see, they apply for a car loan online, receive an answer within 30 seconds and ring an Autonation USA sales person, who cruises out to help close the deal in the comfort of their own living rooms. Honiotes, former national sales director for…
Monday, 22 July 2002 09:45

Ups and Downs

Written by
(Ups) to athletes who give back during the holiday season. Cavaliers forward Shawn Kemp, Browns quarterback Ty Detmer and Indians first baseman Jim Thome and pitcher Steve Karsay are among the many Cleveland athletes who entertained children and passed out toys for those less fortunate last year. They give real meaning to the term “role model.” (Downs) to Goodyear for changing the name of its blimp from “The Spirit of Akron” to “The Spirit of Goodyear.” While the move may be designed to raise corporate awareness, it’s a slap in the face to the city that’s supported the company for…