How banks can leverage regulatory compliance to add value to their business Featured

9:58am EDT October 1, 2012
How banks can leverage regulatory compliance to add value to their business

Banks have been dealing with evolving regulations for as long as banks have been in existence. So while the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act has given some in the banking industry cause for worry, the critical issue is how institutions will evaluate the potential effect and cope with increased regulations. While some banks might buckle under the threat, others will adapt to the new laws and regulations without allowing the complexity and costs of compliance to become an impediment.

“Savvy institutions recognize that the key is aligning their adjustments with their business models and processes,” says Jim Stempak, a principal at Crowe Horwath LLP. “By integrating compliance with normal business operations, banks stand to extract greater value from their business processes.”

Smart Business spoke with Stempak about how banks can find opportunity in new and revised regulations where others find dismay.

What regulations must banks be prepared to deal with in the near term?

Compliance officers are struggling with the efforts of bank regulators as they implement regulations under Dodd-Frank. Banks do not know what to expect from future regulatory examinations or where examiners will focus, so those expectations remain a moving target.

Questions also remain about the range of authority of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), the agency established by Dodd-Frank. All banks will be directly or indirectly affected by CFPB rulemaking. Some will be required to work with this new agency’s examiners, who will be conducting exams and assuming responsibility for consumer compliance regulations in certain banks (those with more than $10 billion in assets). The CFPB is in the process of bringing its employees up to speed on the agency’s mission. Banks, however, are waiting without clear direction regarding the scope and timing of the CFPB examination process and how the new agency will coordinate efforts with other federal bank regulatory agencies. Financial institutions will be forced to contend with this environment of uncertainty for quite some time. Meanwhile, there are some measures that banks can take now that will allow them to successfully navigate this changing environment.

How have banks historically coped with increased regulation while managing to stay successful?

As the dust settles on Dodd-Frank’s initial effects, banks can begin to see that successful adaptation comes down to taking a measured and systematic approach to integrating the requirements with normal processes, often using enhanced technology. However, a silo approach to compliance is unlikely to succeed. Saddling the compliance officer with the sole responsibility of adapting to this new reality is unrealistic. Instead, success requires that key managers throughout the organization get on board. Line-of-business managers, for example, will need to integrate Dodd-Frank compliance into their daily activities, while IT managers will need to adjust existing technology platforms to integrate processes that facilitate compliance, or possibly design entirely new processes and technologies.

History offers examples of how banks learned to turn difficult regulatory requirements into opportunities. Take, for instance, the Know-Your-Customer (KYC) identification programs required by Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) regulations. This mandated banks to catalog their customers’ banking activity to better identify suspicious behavior. To do this, some banks used the information they gathered to develop a profile of each customer.

Another, more effective, approach manipulated existing processes and technology platforms to better gather information while sending a message to each customer that outlined how the bank’s inquiries were intended to better understand each customer and provide him or her with personalized products and services. As a result, the customer experience was improved, new accounts were opened in less time and many cross-selling opportunities became available to the bank. The customer service enhancements were in addition to establishing a solid platform for efficiently and effectively complying with the regulatory requirements.

Similar to what was done for KYC compliance efforts, information obtained through Dodd-Frank mandated data collection also likely will provide opportunities for banks to use the information for marketing and other value-added opportunities. By ingraining the requisite activities in their existing processes, banks were able to successfully adapt to the regulations rather than treating them as if they were burdensome compliance activities.

How can organizations best cope with complying with these regulations?

To facilitate compliance with new or revised regulations, organizations should develop cross-functional teams that alert the organization to changes that are likely to be required or that are coming. Teams can begin to develop strategies for implementing new or revised processes and technology. This will necessitate involvement from thought leaders from all levels of the organization, rather than taking an approach focused solely on compliance. Teams should develop a client-focused experience that also improves product development and existing processes as they work to bring the organization into compliance.

When dealing with certain consumer lending regulations, the team should consist of management representatives from areas including mortgage origination, consumer lending, regulatory compliance, IT and marketing. Teams should coordinate efforts to monitor specific regulations that affect consumer financial products, analyze the customer’s fit with the product and deliver products fairly to all consumers. This is especially important considering CFPB will be carefully evaluating compliance with new and revised regulations for consumer financial products, including mortgage loans.

Every financial institution will be touched by the regulations and it is up to banks to take an integrative approach to compliance to make a smooth transition while positioning them to take a competitive advantage. This will allow them to comply with the regulations while simultaneously advancing their business.

Jim Stempak is a principal at Crowe Horwath LLP. Reach him at (214) 777-5203 or jim.stempak@crowehorwath.com.

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