In 2012, Chief Executive rated Texas as the No. 1 state for business, while California was the worst. Both states have held their titles for eight years in a row. In the survey, based on 650 CEO responses, Texas earned high marks in business-friendly tax, regulatory environment and workforce quality.

Ryan K. Robinson, president and co-owner of Signal Metal Industries Inc., couldn’t imagine his manufacturing business anywhere else. A second-generation company in the area for 40 years, Signal specializes in building heavy equipment and machinery designed to specification.

“Texas is surely one of the most business-friendly states in the union,” Robinson says. “I think within Texas, the city of Irving is somewhat unique in that 70 percent of Irving’s tax base comes from businesses. So the city of Irving and the Greater Irving-Las Colinas Chamber understand that business is the driver of this community.”

Smart Business spoke with Robinson about why Irving is the best location for them, and how to create a good working relationship with municipal organizations.

Why is Irving, Texas, a good location for your business and others?

First and foremost, Irving is centrally located. My company builds large, heavy products that ship coast-to-coast and out of the deep-water port of Houston. Another factor is our plant is located within 10 minutes of the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport.

Also, the workforce in Irving is great. North Irving is a bit glitzier and where Las Colinas is located. This, along with our new Orange Line light rail service, gives Irving sophistication, while South Irving residents are the blue collar, hard-working folks. Therefore, a manufacturing company has a tremendous pool of qualified workers to draw from.

Finally, the city and Greater Irving-Las Colinas Chamber of Commerce have a lot to offer. In Irving, there are headquarters of Fortune 500 companies, medium-sized companies like Signal Metal and a whole host of the mom-and-pop types. The city and chamber realize the value in all of them and tailor programs for the big guys, the medium guys and the small guys.

What makes a good relationship between a manufacturing company like yours and the city or chamber of commerce?

I became a member of the Greater Irving-Las Colinas Chamber three years ago, but my relationship is somewhat unique — as with all of us in Irving — because the chamber is the economic development wing of the city of Irving. Most cities have their own economic development department, but the city of Irving does not. As a member who sits on the chamber’s board, it gives me the ability to directly network with city managers and the mayor of Irving.

Why is this relationship important?

Once you have a relationship with the city, you understand how the city works. A lot of Irving chamber members are retail companies that sell locally, but I don’t have a single customer in Irving. However, you always have to deal with the bureaucracy of the city when you grow — as Signal has in the past five years — and buy property, construct buildings or expand existing facilities.

Since I’ve been involved in the chamber, it’s easier because I know who does what and I have a chance to visit with them. I think that gives me an advantage when getting through the red tape in a timely fashion.

Signal hasn’t grown because of its membership with the chamber, but the relationship with the chamber has facilitated that growth because the chamber has helped make sure everything is in line, whether it be with the fire department, building permits or code enforcement.

Do you have any advice about creating a smooth working relationship with city officials or a chamber of commerce?

My advice is to join and get involved. Your local chamber will welcome you with open arms to serve on a committee or to just take advantage of all the mixers and networking opportunities you get as a member.

Once you get involved in the chamber, you learn more about how the city operates because city officials sit on the board. You’re right there in the middle of it. Getting involved gets you plugged in, and then you can take it from there.

Ryan K. Robinson is president and co-owner at Signal Metal Industries Inc. Reach him at (972) 438-1022 or ryan@signalmetal.com.

Insights Economic Development is brought to you by the Greater Irving-Las Colinas Chamber of Commerce

 

Published in National

 

Irving, Texas is a recipient of the 2012 Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, the nation’s highest Presidential honor for performance through innovation, improvement and visionary leadership. Irving is only the second municipality to receive the award in its 25-year history.

City Manager Tommy Gonzalez said Irving has reduced costs by $44 million and improved satisfaction service levels by double digits.

“We reduced our work force by 10 percent without laying anyone off or implementing furloughs and, at the same time, increased benefits,” he says. “We identified numerous efficiencies that resulted in 50,000 labor hours saved. Code enforcement improved by 88 percent, and we dropped the number of days to turn around commercial building permits from 16 to three and a half. These efforts culminated with Irving retaining its AAA bond rating from Standard & Poor’s and Moody’s during a recession, while offering residents and business owners among the lowest tax rates and water fees in North Texas.”

Smart Business spoke with Gonzalez about the way Irving works with businesses and how to apply these lessons.

How should a good relationship between a business owner and the municipality work?

Good communication between the city and business community is important. By having a proactive communication flow, the city gets intelligence on issues business owners are having with city processes. For example, Irving was considering an ordinance that would impact the certification of restaurant servers. Because the city reached out to businesses, it was able to make the ordinance helpful to customer safety but not so onerous to implement. Another example was a state highway project through the middle of Irving where the city and the chamber of commerce coordinated with the state to help businesses relocate and/or work with the department of transportation.

So, both sides need to reach out to each other?

Yes. Irving has 39 different ways to communicate with customers — in this case businesses — like newsletters, our website, Facebook, Twitter, email blasts, etc. If there’s a new project, the city can let others know how it might impact them and keep them in the loop.

What are some of the best ways through government bureaucracy and red tape, including navigating the permit process?

The city made an effort to speed up the permit process because when a business is building a large structure, in order to create several hundred jobs, and in some cases thousands of jobs, you don’t want to hold up the work. Irving’s permitting process now takes three and a half days after eliminating unnecessary steps. Using incentives, Irving built a new culture and a new way of thinking. Another way to minimize the red tape is through surveys. Between random and point of service surveys, done at the departmental level, the city can listen and then change the way it does business. Many times problems or improvements are obvious to business owners, but not to the city.

Aside from letting the municipality know about issues, when business owners show up for permits, bring as much information — plans and documents — as you can. Those that come forward with complete and comprehensive information in hand will get processed quicker.

How can local entities assist employers with state or federal issues? 

Cities can work in cooperation with businesses on some developmental opportunities. In some cases Irving has received federal grants that not only help the public sector but also tie in with private development, especially for environmental issues. The local government also can supplement state or federal services. For example, the state picks up litter along state highways twice a year, but Irving stepped in to pick up litter more often, resulting in a cleaner highway that people assume is safer, which in turn increases the community’s value.

Tommy Gonzalez is city manager of Irving, Texas. Reach him at (972) 721-2521 or tgonzalez@cityofirving.org. Visit the Greater Irving-Las Colinas Chamber of Commerce at www.irvingchamber.com.

Click for the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s profile on Irving — Baldrige: Irving is ‘A Lone Star Model of Fiscal Achievement.'

Insights Economic Development is brought to you by the Greater Irving-Las Colinas Chamber of Commerce

Published in Atlanta

In 2012, Chief Executive rated Texas as the No. 1 state for business, while California was the worst. Both states have held their titles for eight years in a row. In the survey, based on 650 CEO responses, Texas earned high marks in business-friendly tax, regulatory environment and work force quality.

Ryan K. Robinson, president and co-owner of Signal Metal Industries Inc., says he couldn’t imagine having his manufacturing business anywhere else. A second-generation company that has been in the area for 40 years, Signal specializes in building heavy equipment and machinery designed to specification.

“Texas is surely one of the most business-friendly states in the Union,” Robinson says. “I think within Texas, the city of Irving is somewhat unique in that 70 percent of Irving’s tax base comes from businesses. So the city of Irving and the Greater Irving-Las Colinas Chamber understand that business is the driver of this community.”

Smart Business spoke with Robinson about why Irving is the best location for them, and how to create a good working relationship between your business and municipal organizations.

Why is Irving, Texas, a good location for your business and others?

First and foremost, Irving is centrally located within the country. My company builds large, heavy products that ship coast to coast and out of the deep water port of Houston Another factor is our great airport — our plant is located within 10 minutes of the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, one of the five busiest airports in the world.

Also, the work force in Irving is great. North Irving is a bit glitzier and is where Las Colinas is located. This, along with our new Orange Line light rail service, gives Irving the sophistication that it needs to be a power player with everyone around the country.

South Irving residents are the blue collar, hard-working folks. Therefore, we have a tremendous pool of qualified workers that we eagerly draw from. It’s a great place to have a manufacturing company, especially if you are located in the southern part of the city along with many other manufacturing companies.

Finally, the city and Greater Irving-Las Colinas Chamber of Commerce have a lot to offer any business. In Irving, there are headquarters of Fortune 500 companies, medium-sized companies like Signal Metal and a whole host of the mom-and-pop types. The city and chamber realize the value in all of them and tailor programs for the big guys, the medium guys and the small guys.

In your experience, what makes a good relationship between a manufacturing company like yours and the city or chamber of commerce?

Becoming a member of the Greater Irving-Las Colinas Chamber three years ago created the relationship, but my relationship is somewhat unique — as with all of us here in Irving — because the chamber is the economic development wing of the city of Irving.

Most cities have their own economic development department. The city of Irving does not; it is a partnership between the city and the chamber. That is one of the main reasons why Signal wanted to become a member of the chamber and why I wanted to serve on the board, because it gives me the ability to network with city managers and the mayor of Irving directly because they sit on the same board as I do.

Why is this relationship important?

Once you have a relationship with the city, you understand how the city works. A lot of members in the Irving Chamber are retail companies that sell to the public in Irving, but I don’t have a single customer in Irving. However, you always have to deal with the bureaucracy of the city when you grow — as Signal has in the past five years — and buy property, construct buildings or expand existing facilities.

Since I’ve been involved in the chamber, it’s made things much easier because I know who does what and I have a chance to visit with them. I think that gives me an advantage when it comes to getting through the red tape in a timely fashion.

Signal hasn’t grown because of its membership with the chamber, but the relationship with the chamber has facilitated that growth because the chamber has helped negotiate and make sure everything is in line, whether it be with the fire department, building permits or code enforcement.

Do you have any advice for other business owners about creating a smooth working relationship with city officials or the chamber of commerce?

My advice is to join and get involved. There’s plenty of opportunity to get involved at the Irving Chamber. Your local chamber will welcome you with open arms to serve on a committee or to just take advantage of all the mixers and networking opportunities you get as a member.

Once you get involved in the chamber, you learn more about how the city operates because city officials sit on the board. They talk about the opportunities and the successes of the city. You’re right there in the middle of it. Getting involved gets you plugged in, and then you can take it from there.

Ryan K. Robinson is president and co-owner of Signal Metal Industries Inc. Reach him at (972) 438-1022 or ryan@signalmetal.com. Visit the Greater Irving-Las Colinas Chamber of Commerce at www.irvingchamber.com.

Insights Economic Development is brought to you by Greater Irving-Las Colinas Chamber of Commerce

Published in Los Angeles