Fed’s Williams: Policies have aided growth without undue fallout

IRVINE, Calif., Tue Nov 6, 2012 – The U.S. Federal Reserve’s unconventional monetary policies have lowered borrowing costs and boosted growth without creating unwanted inflation, a top Fed official said on Monday, predicting the Fed’s latest round of asset-buying will exceed $600 billion.

The Fed will want to see sustained jobs gains and a consistent drop in the unemployment rate before it stops buying assets, making it likely the purchases will continue until “well into next year,” John Williams, president of the San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank, told reporters after a lecture at the University of California, Irvine.

The U.S. central bank’s prior round of quantitative easing totaled $600 billion; its first one was about $1.7 trillion.

The Fed began its third round of quantitative easing, known as QE3, in September, beginning with $40 billion a month in mortgage-backed securities and promising to continue or expand the purchases if the labor market does not improve substantially.

Although asset-buying and other non-traditional monetary policies pose potential risks, “the available evidence suggests they have been effective in stimulating growth without creating an undesirable rise in inflation,” Williams said at the lecture. “We are not seeing signs of rising inflation on the horizon.”