4 necessary skills for managing people Featured

11:29am EDT December 25, 2012
4 necessary skills for managing people

According to Merriam-Webster, management is “the process of dealing with or controlling things or people.” While “controlling” is a bit harsh in my book, the definition is correct in it's focus on management of people. To be a good manager or team leader, you have to have an above average interest in people. Success in management is found in the relationship developed between leader and team.

The best managers see themselves as catalysts. They become that agent or force that provokes or speeds significant change or action. These managers get things done quickly by leading with solid people skills.

Here are 4 people skills that every good manager must possess:

1. Understanding the right way to give a critique.

The worst thing you can do if you want to get someone to listen to you is to criticize.

As human beings, we hate to be criticized. When we feel attacked, we usually attack back – even when we are in the wrong. Many of us fall into the trap of thinking “I know I am right and I am going to prove it to you.”

Over the years I have learned that this way of thinking simply does not work.

A good manager has the self-control and presence of mind to put aside the needs of his own ego and say “I've got a problem, will you help me?” Enlisting cooperation in this manner will always lead to better results.

2. Understanding the need to help.

If someone comes in to criticize you or to raise your game, under what circumstances would you be willing to accept the critique?

The answer for me is simple. If I think someone is really trying to help me, then I'll engage and listen.

On the other hand, if I feel that the person is just trying to get the job done or make himself look good, I may listen, but my heart will not be in it. My interest and creative energies will be lost.

The truth of the matter is: Managers will only have influence over their people to the extent that their people think they are sincerely trying to help them. It is simply the way human beings work. Good managers truly care about their team and work hard to help them.

3. Understanding no two people are the same.

As a manager, you do not influence everybody the same way. People do things for their own reasons – not for others and not for you.

Inspiring people to your company vision happens best when you help them to see what's in it for them. This varies from person to person. It is your job to discover what things motivate each member of your team.

Some people are motivated by a challenge, some by money and others by recognition.

It is about reading their needs, desires and wants and then leading in such a way that ensures their success at obtaining them.

4, Understanding the best way to get tasks completed.

An effective manager realizes that each time he has an interaction with someone about a task, there are two things going on:

a. A discussion about the task and how to get it done.

b. The way in which the interaction affects the managers relationship with the collegue.

The first is pretty straightforward, but it's success is determined by the tenor of the second.

It must be said that the task should not be sacrificed for the relationship at all costs. It must also be said that winning on the task is not good if the manager ruins the relationship. Both are important and the manager must do well in each area.

I refer again to the need for the manager to develop relationships with the team in order to understand the best way to get things done according to individual members needs, desires and strengths.

In the end, good managers know how to use their influence and power to help others achieve beyond their wildest dreams.

I like management guru Tom Peters' definition of power:

“My definition of power is understanding that all of managing — and this comes out of the old grade school book — is the notion of doing more than you and I can do by ourselves; that is, doing things through other people.”

He goes on to say:

“If you are interested in getting things done effectively and imaginatively through other people then what you're trying to do in the workplace is exactly what you're trying to do on the football field – which is to get people who work with you to achieve beyong their wildest dreams.”

Workplace managers understand that good people skills determine their success. They work hard to develop the skills needed to lead in ways that shows their interest in people.

DeLores Pressleymotivational speaker and personal power expert, is one of the most respected and sought-after experts on success, motivation, confidence and personal power. She is an international keynote speaker, author, life coach and the founder of the Born Successful Institute and DeLores Pressley Worldwide. She helps individuals utilize personal power, increase confidence and live a life of significance. Her story has been touted in The Washington Post, Black Enterprise, First for Women, Essence, New York Daily News, Ebony and Marie Claire. She is a frequent media guest and has been interviewed on every major network – ABC, NBC, CBS and FOX – including America’s top rated shows OPRAH and Entertainment Tonight.

She is the author of “Oh Yes You Can,” “Clean Out the Closet of Your Life” and “Believe in the Power of You.” To book her as a speaker or coach, contact her office at 330.649.9809 or via email atinfo@delorespressley.com or visit her website at www.delorespressley.com.