Maintaining a culture aligned with brand requires constant effort to keep it in sync. So if this is what you are hoping to achieve, remember it is not a road trip you can cross off your bucket list — it’s a journey for the life of your organization.

So how do you get started? Let’s begin by reviewing some travel tips. As CEO, you don’t need to do all of the driving, but you do need to lead the charge and keep the journey on track.

It will take you longer to get there than you think. It will require ongoing resources: time, training, communication and celebration, even at the expense of short-term profit.

Define your brand

What is your brand? You need to know what “living the brand” means for your organization. If you are not sure if you have a clear brand position, start with a brand discovery. It will be well worth it. Your brand is already alive within your organization — it is a part of its core. You just need to uncover it. Defining the brand and making it the company’s primary focus helps clarify for employees what is brand behavior and what is not.

Conduct an employee survey to determine what beliefs exist within the organization that will either help or hinder you in achieving the brand culture you are seeking. What will emerge from this survey are alignment gaps that will need to be addressed.

Employees want to believe their company has a meaningful purpose. They want to know their job is important. They want to make a difference. Employees need to feel a sense of pride and ownership in what they do and they want to understand their personal connection with the company’s brand and its customers. When this exists, there is a natural excitement and passion for their work because it has purpose.

Conduct an organizational assessment to determine how brand is being conveyed at every touch point within the company. Again, what will emerge from this assessment are brand delivery gaps that will need to be addressed.

Employees who interact with customers on a regular basis will play a lead role in delivering the brand, but it will require all employees to adopt brand behavior in order to truly deliver the brand effectively. It has to become a part of the company culture to succeed.

What long-term delivery requires

Delivering on the brand for the long term requires priority, organizational structure, and ongoing communication and monitoring. The importance of brand focus needs to remain top-of-mind. It must constantly be reinforced by the CEO.

To become a part of company culture, brand delivery needs to be woven into the company’s operating procedures — including hiring for the beliefs and core values that drive the desired brand behaviors.

Senior leadership needs to have the authority to make changes or remove any barriers that prevent employees from delivering the brand promise to customers. Financial as well as strategic decisions will need to be made to continue to deliver a high impact brand experience as technology and social patterns change.

It will take an internal team to monitor brand delivery, manage associate training and plan the celebration of successes.

When culture aligns with brand, customers notice and become more likely to interact with your company and recommend it to others. The best time to start the journey is now. ?

Kelly Borth is CEO and chief strategy officer for Greencrest, a 22-year-old brand development, strategic marketing and digital media firm that turns market players into market leaders. Borth has received numerous honors for her business and community leadership. She serves on several local advisory boards and is one of 30 certified brand strategists in the United States. Reach her at (614) 885-7921, kborth@greencrest.com, @brandpro or for more information, visit www.greencrest.com.

 

Published in Columbus

Most leaders understand that it’s critically important to collaborate regularly on initiatives with their employees, but are they getting all they can out of these interactions?

What leaders may be missing is a new paradigm for employee engagement and competitive advantage.

Many of them are working from an old style of management in which business decisions are made at the top and leaders follow a hierarchy of authority. Senior executives must still set strategy and manage for results, but they can likely achieve better outcomes by letting go.

Authors Craig Schreiber and Kathleen M. Carley explain that adapting a participative-style leadership environment allows people and the business to co-evolve into higher levels, enhancing personal responsibility, accountability, collaboration, innovation and business outcomes.

To do this, leaders need to empower employees to collectively make decisions that drive results and train employees to work in this model.

Empower employees

Employees on the front line are often in the best position to see trends and market opportunities.

Leaders can help drive businesses in new directions and enhance their bottom line by giving lower-level managers and line employees the support and encouragement to assume a much higher level of accountability and responsibility.

Information creation and sharing based on trust are critical components of innovation, according to author R.E. Miles. As they feel more engaged, employees are also more motivated to contribute and add value.

To achieve this, leaders must create an environment where risk within certain boundaries is rewarded so that employees feel comfortable enough to act on their abilities and instincts.

Leaders can support employees by encouraging ideas to grow and flourish among employees rather than through the manager. This will allow employees to identify and pursue opportunities that benefit the company.

Provide training

The most important — and often most challenging — aspect of leadership is constant follow-through. It is important to discuss leadership techniques with employees and provide training.

Talking through leadership strategies with employees calibrates the group to be more in alignment. It also increases follow-through from employees who feel a part of the process.

Leaders can do this by:

?  Discussing best practices among participants

?  Identifying leadership needs

?  Generating solutions that fit with the needs of the group

?  Sharing best practices of employee collaboration throughout the company

?  Recognizing work among employees and outcomes

For example, a bank executive wanted leadership training for her front-line managers. Her goal was for them to be able to work out problems and challenges independently or as a leadership group without constantly seeking guidance.

For 10 weeks, we challenged the managers to take more risk and encouraged them to make more decisions at their level. Through group coaching meetings, the employees helped each other consider best alternatives and the executive learned how to manage by letting go. The managers reported feeling more encouraged and engaged, which considerably enhanced results. ?

Jay Colker, DM, MBA, MA is core faculty for the master’s in counseling and organizational psychology program at the Adler School of Professional Psychology. Colker also maintains a human capital consulting practice and may be reached at jcolker@adler.edu or at (312) 213-3421.

 

 

Published in Chicago

Most leaders understand that it’s critically important to collaborate regularly on initiatives with their employees, but are they getting all they can out of these interactions?

What leaders may be missing is a new paradigm for employee engagement and competitive advantage.

Many of them are working from an old style of management in which business decisions are made at the top and leaders follow a hierarchy of authority. Senior executives must still set strategy and manage for results, but they can likely achieve better outcomes by letting go.

Authors Craig Schreiber and Kathleen M. Carley explain that adapting a participative-style leadership environment allows people and the business to co-evolve into higher levels, enhancing personal responsibility, accountability, collaboration, innovation and business outcomes.

To do this, leaders need to empower employees to collectively make decisions that drive results and train employees to work in this model.

Empower employees

Employees on the front line are often in the best position to see trends and market opportunities.

Leaders can help drive businesses in new directions and enhance their bottom line by giving lower-level managers and line employees the support and encouragement to assume a much higher level of accountability and responsibility.

Information creation and sharing based on trust are critical components of innovation, according to author R.E. Miles. As they feel more engaged, employees are also more motivated to contribute and add value.

To achieve this, leaders must create an environment where risk within certain boundaries is rewarded so that employees feel comfortable enough to act on their abilities and instincts.

Leaders can support employees by encouraging ideas to grow and flourish among employees rather than through the manager. This will allow employees to identify and pursue opportunities that benefit the company.

Provide training

The most important — and often most challenging — aspect of leadership is constant follow-through. It is important to discuss leadership techniques with employees and provide training.

Talking through leadership strategies with employees calibrates the group to be more in alignment. It also increases follow-through from employees who feel a part of the process.

Leaders can do this by:

?  Discussing best practices among participants

?  Identifying leadership needs

?  Generating solutions that fit with the needs of the group

?  Sharing best practices of employee collaboration throughout the company

?  Recognizing work among employees and outcomes

For example, a bank executive wanted leadership training for her front-line managers. Her goal was for them to be able to work out problems and challenges independently or as a leadership group without constantly seeking guidance.

For 10 weeks, we challenged the managers to take more risk and encouraged them to make more decisions at their level. Through group coaching meetings, the employees helped each other consider best alternatives and the executive learned how to manage by letting go. The managers reported feeling more encouraged and engaged, which considerably enhanced results. ?

Jay Colker, DM, MBA, MA is core faculty for the master’s in counseling and organizational psychology program at the Adler School of Professional Psychology. Colker also maintains a human capital consulting practice and may be reached at jcolker@adler.edu or at (312) 213-3421.

 

 

Published in Chicago

BuschKeith0806_72pRGBLooking to build a strong brand? Whether you’re a small business or a Fortune 500 company, it’s critical to start with a strong foundation of market understanding. 

Insights about your target audience are the building blocks that help form the promise your brand makes to consumers. In order for this promise to be effective, you will need a thorough understanding of three essential truths:

Your company’s unique strengths — What are you known for? What do you aspire to be? How do you live up to that vision?

Your market opportunity — What are the trends in your industry? How can you capitalize on opportunities and mitigate threats?

Your target audience’s needs — What’s important to your consumers and what makes them tick? How do they make purchase decisions? What problem does your product or service solve for them?

To uncover important insights about your company, you need to harness all your powers of observation, turning them both inward and outward.

Looking inward begins by talking to your own employees. Ask them what they find unique or inspiring about your company. Inquire about what they’ve heard — good or bad — from people who use your company’s products or services. Talk to your customer service personnel, too, finding out what “the feet on the ground” might have seen or heard.

Looking outward means going where consumers are — both offline and online — and posing questions such as “Why do you choose our brand?” “What do you like about us?” “What could we do better?” “How do we compare against our competitors?”

Sharp observation also includes mining consumer satisfaction survey data, online ratings, reviews and blogs. You’d be amazed at what a little Googling will uncover — you’ll discover what excites people about your brand as well as what turns them off, giving you the opportunity to address both.

Only after you uncover these kinds of insights can you begin to build your brand promise. The most successful brand promises are relevant, differentiated, extendable and credible.

?  Relevant. A brand promise should be genuinely motivating to consumers because it’s attuned to the things that are most important to them.

?  Differentiated. Your brand promise should be one that only your company can make. If your competitors could make the same promise, you should explore a different territory.

?  Extendable. Effective brand promises resonate in any medium, maximizing your ability to reach consumers wherever they are.

?  Credible. Make sure you can deliver on your promise and substantiate your claims. Your performance and your consumers’ experiences will determine whether your audience believes you or not.

Remember, just as you may find a broad range of consumer feedback about your company through Google, so will consumers. Which means once you arrive at your brand promise, you’ll want to identify and leverage all possible venues in which consumers may interact with your brand, not just advertising. Consider the following:

?  Facebook, YouTube or a company blog are great ways to provide your consumers with helpful content.

?  Networking with relevant industry influencers, such as bloggers or pertinent media, can help you generate additional strategic content about your brand.

?  Paid search on search engine pages can nicely augment your marketing efforts — it means that when consumers are in-market, they’ll see your company name on their first stop.

For marketers seeking to ensure their long-term success, building a strong brand promise based on market understanding and insights is the all-important first step. ?

A highly strategic marketing communications executive, Keith Busch, vice president for client development at Hitchcock Fleming & Associates Inc., has more than 20 years of experience in helping clients achieve critical growth goals, key metrics and ROI objectives. In addition to working with clients such as The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. and AkzoNobel, he is active in the Akron-area community and serves on the boards of the Greenleaf Family Center and The Northeast Ohio Arthritis Foundation. Visit www.teamhfa.com.

 

Published in Akron/Canton

R-E-S-P-E-C-T? Find out what it means to you

Move over, Aretha Franklin. While she did popularize the word “respect” in her chart-topping single in 1967, respect has been a fundamental building block for successful companies for decades, well before Aretha arrived on the scene.

Respect does not come with age; it is earned. In my humble opinion, there is no management tool more important or powerful than respect itself.

Businesses fundamentally exist to make money, but the currency that is traded inside every organization is respect.

Walk through any office today and listen to the conversations, from the boardroom to the watercooler. What will you find? Probably elements of both respect and disrespect. If you command respect, people listen attentively when you talk and follow your direction. It can be seen in both body language and facial expressions. On the other hand, if you don’t command respect, you will quickly become the focus of ill-timed conversation.

Having said that, here are eight irrefutable and effective building blocks for you to earn (and keep) respect.

1. Be real. People will not respect you if you are not natural. Our workforce is smart — they have the ability to detect those who are “faking it.” There’s no stronger foundation for earning respect than being, well, you.

2. Be interested. People like to be listened to. When people realize they are being heard, they’ll open up and tell you what is important to them about their jobs, their concerns and goals within the organization. It pays to listen.

3. Be a safe harbor. Workplaces are hotbeds for gossip. Create an environment of openness and confidentiality. When people realize you can safely be told anything within the confines of your relationship, you’ll become the one person everyone seeks out when they really need some perspective, advice and direction.

4. Be helpful. People respect those who contribute. Being a contributor means making it your primary goal to help others achieve their goals. Remember, it is important to pay it forward and work with others within your organization to help their dreams be realized.

5. Be creative. People respect innovation. The “same old, same old” mentality left us years ago. By being creative and coming up with new, fresh ideas will motivate the workforce and results will speak for themselves.

6. Be a risk-taker. Associates gravitate to those who take chances — and are willing to look at life through a different set of lenses. They do not accept traditional thinking. Be willing to take chances. Remember: Failure is a way we all learn.

7. Be spontaneous. Use your position to create an environment of fun within your organization. Introduce special events and do so without warning. Consider, for example, an Aloha Day after several weeks of dreary weather or hire a massage therapist after a busy business season. Let your mind wander here.

8. Be respectful of other people’s time. There is nothing more valuable in today’s business world than time. You can make more money, but you can’t make more time. One of my favorite mottos that I follow is, “Be brief, be blunt, be gone.” And I live by it.

Remember again, respect does not come with a job title or age; it is earned. Make it a central part of your personal business strategy. The results will speak for themselves.

G. A. Taylor Fernley is president and CEO of Fernley & Fernley, an association management company providing professional management services to non-profit organizations since 1886. He can be reached at tfernley@fernley.com, or for more information, visit www.fernley.com.

Published in Philadelphia

One of the biggest differences between running a business on the side and quitting your job to run it full time is that you lose the security of a steady paycheck. That loss of income and the uncertainty as to whether it will ever come back is enough to make anyone pause and reconsider quitting their day job.

But what if your part-time venture is beginning to pick up steam, and you earnestly believe that it needs your full, undivided attention? While it can be scary, there are steps you can take to make such a leap less daunting.

Get organized

When you begin your business in earnest, take time to reduce your clutter. Working out of a messy office will eat much more time than it takes to get everything organized.

Speaking of time, making the transition to full-time business owner means also becoming much more self-motivated and coordinated. There is no one to remind you to clock in or to hound you about being late.

It’s great to go about the day without being micromanaged, but be careful. It’s just as easy to slip into a state of complacency. Organize your space, set a schedule and stay disciplined.

Protect yourself

There is always going to be some element of risk involved in whatever you decide to do next. But there are also actions that a new full-time business owner can take to reduce some of that risk.

As a part-time owner, chances are high that your business is a sole proprietorship — sort of the default business structure. Unfortunately, that means that you are responsible for your business’s debts, and if things go south, debt collectors may start trying to take your personal assets to pay for those business debts.

When you jump to full-time, consider forming an LLC or S corporation. There are different advantages and disadvantages to these structures, but they will help protect your personal property by separating you and your business’s debts.

Make saving a priority

Take full advantage of that steady paycheck for as long as you have it and save. Anyone looking to branch out and start a business has to use every cost-cutting measure out there so they have breathing room when trying to get their new business to turn a profit. Advisers typically recommend having enough saved up to pay for four to six months of living expenses. Luckily, if a business is being run part-time, it may be pulling in money already.

There is no magic number for saving — it just needs to be enough so that you don’t have to dig for change to pay your electric bill. Meet with an accountant, crunch the numbers and make sure you’re comfortable with the recommendations they give on budgeting and working with your financial situation.

Part-time owners know their company can draw customers, sell a product or service and bring in money since it has already been doing just that. This insight makes it very tempting to throw caution to the wind and jump into full-time ownership without making the necessary preparations.

But don’t take a huge leap without ensuring your fall is cushioned. Take your time, get everything in order, protect your assets and meet with an accountant to solidify a plan. Next, take a deep breath and put in your two weeks’ notice — you’re now a full-time business owner.

Deborah Sweeney is the CEO of MyCorporation. Find her online at mycorporation.com and on Twitter @deborahsweeney and @mycorporation.

Published in Columnist

Most leaders understand that it’s critically important to collaborate regularly on initiatives with their employees, but are they getting all they can out of these interactions?

What leaders may be missing is a new paradigm for employee engagement and competitive advantage.

Many of them are working from an old style of management in which business decisions are made at the top and leaders follow a hierarchy of authority. Senior executives must still set strategy and manage for results, but they can likely achieve better outcomes by letting go.

Authors Craig Schreiber and Kathleen M. Carley explain that adapting a participative-style leadership environment allows people and the business to co-evolve into higher levels, enhancing personal responsibility, accountability, collaboration, innovation and business outcomes.

To do this, leaders need to empower employees to collectively make decisions that drive results and train employees to work in this model.

Empower employees

Employees on the front line are often in the best position to see trends and market opportunities.

Leaders can help drive businesses in new directions and enhance their bottom line by giving lower-level managers and line employees the support and encouragement to assume a much higher level of accountability and responsibility.

Information creation and sharing based on trust are critical components of innovation, according to author R.E. Miles. As they feel more engaged, employees are also more motivated to contribute and add value.

To achieve this, leaders must create an environment where risk within certain boundaries is rewarded so that employees feel comfortable enough to act on their abilities and instincts.

Leaders can support employees by encouraging ideas to grow and flourish among employees rather than through the manager. This will allow employees to identify and pursue opportunities that benefit the company.

Provide training

The most important — and often most challenging — aspect of leadership is constant follow-through. It is important to discuss leadership techniques with employees and provide training.

Talking through leadership strategies with employees calibrates the group to be more in alignment. It also increases follow-through from employees who feel a part of the process.

Leaders can do this by:

?  Discussing best practices among participants

?  Identifying leadership needs

?  Generating solutions that fit with the needs of the group

?  Sharing best practices of employee collaboration throughout the company

?  Recognizing work among employees and outcomes

For example, a bank executive wanted leadership training for her front-line managers. Her goal was for them to be able to work out problems and challenges independently or as a leadership group without constantly seeking guidance.

For 10 weeks, we challenged the managers to take more risk and encouraged them to make more decisions at their level. Through group coaching meetings, the employees helped each other consider best alternatives and the executive learned how to manage by letting go. The managers reported feeling more encouraged and engaged, which considerably enhanced results.

Jay Colker, DM, MBA, MA is core faculty for the master’s in counseling and organizational psychology program at the Adler School of Professional Psychology. Colker also maintains a human capital consulting practice and may be reached at jcolker@adler.edu or at (312) 213-3421.

Published in Chicago

A colleague of mine used to live in Russia and was stuck in more than a few traffic jams on those rare occasions when he wasn’t on the subway or a bus. Moscow, a city of more than 10 million people, had a highway system built for fewer cars.

The Russian word for traffic jam is probka — which also refers to a “cork,” which one might encounter in a bottle. When you think about it, that’s an apt description for a traffic jam.

In a similar way, our thinking and the organizations we lead can get “bottled up” too if we don’t have an effective system for reining in our attention and focus.

Thinking can be a bottleneck

One type of bottleneck that can occur is with our thinking. We have all experienced what one psychologist calls a “response selection bottleneck.” This happens when our brains try to react to multiple stimuli at the same time. For example, the “multitasking” CEO allows bottlenecks to occur when he or she believes that it’s possible to effectively tackle two conscious tasks at once.

We know, of course, that most of us can walk and chew gum at the same time. But, as John Medina states in “Brain Rules,” we are “biologically incapable of processing attention-rich inputs simultaneously.” Medina suggests that we really can’t listen effectively to the conference call and respond to email at the same time.

What is actually happening when we think we’re multitasking is that we’re doing what some call “switch tasking” — we’re switching our attention from one task to another. Some of us may do it more quickly than others, but our brain isn’t really processing two tasks at once.

The most common contemporary example of this fight for attention in our everyday lives is — you guessed it — talking on a cell phone while driving. Medina points out that those talking on the phone are a “half-second slower to hit the brakes in emergencies” because our brains have to switch tasks, and this eats up critical time. He adds that “50 percent of the visual cues spotted by attentive drivers are missed by cell-phone talkers.”

Not only are there limits for individuals, but the organizations we lead have similar limits. Are there organizational decisions stuck at a bottleneck because you have too many competing priorities?

Our organizations are often very complex, which makes it hard for employees to focus on what will lead to individual, team and organizational success. We’re all working longer hours, often feeling like we’re moving from treading water to drowning.

How do we distinguish the imperative from the important?

Here are five tips to get started:

?  Identify what you’re best at.

?  Figure out what your key stakeholders value and need most.

?  Identify where your answers to 1 and 2 intersect.

?  Define how you deliver value differently than your competition.

?  Develop a clear and authentic way to communicate your value.

As one psychology professor puts it, “We’re really built to focus.” What are you giving your organization to focus on?

P.S. As a bonus tip, when meeting with your senior team to discuss the tips above, are there at least portions of your meetings when everyone’s smartphone can go into a black box until you’re finished? ?

Andy Kanefield is the founder of Dialect Inc. and co-author of “Uncommon Sense:  One CEO’s Tale of Getting in Sync.” To explore how to promote organizational sync through greater focus, you may reach Kanefield at (314) 863-4400 or andy@dialect.com.

Published in St. Louis
Sunday, 31 March 2013 20:00

Stephan Liozu: The value imperative

With the world of business changing faster and becoming more complex every decade, organizations today have to adapt, reinvent, differentiate or die. Over the past few years, the nature and intensity of these changes in the business landscape has created organizational disruption and a realistic need to redesign organizational strategy and leadership approaches.

The process is not easy, and this is why many executives in organizations decide to stay the course, bury their head in the sand, and copy and paste what others are doing. Today, businesses are realizing that they cannot cut their way to prosperity and that their growth potential has been severely reduced due to the continued recessionary trends.

They are starting to look at their business models and are reinventing their value propositions in order to generate customer excitement, boost value-creation programs and capture value through value-based pricing. These companies get it. Many, though, do not.

The following are tips on how you can embrace the value imperative and design and implement leadership initiatives to place customer value at the center of business.

Conduct meetings

Organize a series of off-site meetings with key people to have a realistic, candid and mindful conversation about your value proposition: Why are customers buying from us? What makes us truly different? Are we paying enough attention to our business model? Are we working on the right projects to support our value proposition?

This meeting should be led by top executives to demonstrate the importance of the process. I recommend you avoid the use of consultants, keep the agenda semi-structured to create conversational flow and reinforce that this is a confidential and safe environment.

Define your core

Identify what your true “core business” is that brings most of your revenue and profits: Are we bringing enough value to customers? Are we losing steam in our differentiation? Are competitors catching up on us? Does the core business need to be reinvigorated? Defining the true core business might end up being an interesting process as a team.

I recommend you avoid the use of the constraining and sterile strategic analysis tools such as SWOT analysis, market forces analysis and others. Start with a white sheet of paper and see where it takes you.

Find ‘hidden assets’

Identify your “hidden assets” that are creating excitement with customers and generating profit but that you have taken for granted, not paid attention to or underestimated. List these assets, celebrate having them and evaluate their contribution to the overall value proposition.

The definition of what a hidden asset is might get tricky, but it is worth having it. Launch the conversation of what-if scenarios: What if we had more of this or we did more of that? What would be the impact on customers?

Based on the previous steps, start redesigning your core business and value proposition by reinforcing the strengths you clearly have identified and by leveraging your hidden assets. While it is important to fix gaps or work on weaknesses, leveraging strengths and hidden assets might have a greater return.

Eventually, the result of this business model redesign process will need to be integrated in the strategic planning process. This process is critical to re-energize your value proposition and your overall business model. It is also a great opportunity to emphasize with your leadership team that all you need to do is create customer value and increase loyalty.

When times are tough, customers will make quality/performance sacrifices, will try other alternatives to reduce costs and will challenge your value proposition. My view is that the best defense is a calculated offense. ?

 

Stephan Liozu (www.stephanliozu.com) is the founder of Value Innoruption Advisors. He specializes in disruptive approaches in strategy, innovation and value management. He is also a Ph.D. candidate in management at Case Western Reserve University and can be reached at sliozu@case.edu. 

Published in Pittsburgh

Most of the companies I admire in the world I think have a deeper purpose. I’ve met a lot of successful entrepreneurs. They all started their businesses not to maximize shareholder value but to pursue a dream.” – John Mackey, CEO and founder of Whole Foods Market Inc.

What would the world look like if each of us pursued purpose before profit?

Just a glance at the headlines reveals example after example of leadership gone awry: people failing to do the jobs with which they were entrusted, mired in greed, wastefulness and willful deception. Gross abuses of power and criminality are all too common. It seems time for drastic change.

When will we close the door on cynicism and complacency? When will we say enough is enough to self-serving leadership and instead examine the impact we’re having on those around us? How can we begin to seek the greater good before our own interests?

It begins with each of us intentionally pursuing our full potential, striving for a purpose greater than ourselves. When we achieve that, our businesses, communities and people will thrive. Profitability will follow purpose, not profitability for the purpose of self-aggrandizement.

Inspire a vision for the greater good.

Deep down, most of us crave a cause to aspire to that is greater than ourselves. In order to lead for the greater good, we must create an expansive vision of the future that engages and inspires those around us. The vision must be one we’re passionate about; positivity is contagious. Those we lead will see that the objective isn’t solely about personal success but rather about a work product everyone can be proud of.

There are two ways we can begin to do this. One is by bringing together diverse teams to share their dreams for the company and their part in making it happen. For this to be a success, we must create inclusive environments where each person feels safe to fully participate.

The second way is to create opportunities for leaders to thoughtfully engage around what it means to lead for the greater good. How does each person define it? What does it mean for the organization as a whole?

Recognize the power of relationships.

When we lead for the greater good, we focus on what’s best for our organizations and our employees. Leading for the greater good means you don’t browbeat people into doing what you want. Instead it’s about determining if they want what you want and vice versa. It’s about shared goals and full engagement in working toward those goals. This can’t be achieved through coercion or with a megaphone. Instead it requires relationships developed through conversation.

In a June 2012 article in Harvard Business Review titled “Leadership is Conversation,” Boris Groysberg and Michael Slind affirm the role of conversation for today’s leaders. They rightly point out that a top-down leadership approach is on the way out and that leadership that emphasizes conversation is the way of the future. They have coined a model called “organizational conversation,” which simply emphasizes intimacy, interactivity, inclusion and intentionality.

As leaders, we need to ask ourselves, which of my actions and habits limit or prevent relationship-building? Am I contributing to an atmosphere of intimacy and trust,or of fear and exclusion? Which of my behaviors are selfish and which are leading for the greater good? Am I investing the time to meaningfully engage with people and learn from them? Are they open to learn from me?

Damaging behaviors include being distant or inaccessible, overly judgmental and critical, and dismissing the contributions of others. Selfishness and bad behavior have been shown to be contagious, as have positive behaviors. As leaders, we must recognize that relationships can’t take root in a climate where negative behaviors are flourishing. Shifting the climate to one of positivity and interactivity is incumbent on us.

Give credit to others.

Leaders who lead for the greater good aren’t trying to amass credit for themselves. They understand that their employees want and deserve credit too, and they know that by giving them recognition, everyone benefits. It should be obvious that people will be more likely to support your goals when they see your primary interest isn’t self-promotion but rather teamwork. Create opportunities to recognize the contributions of others.

Emotion and behavior are contagious. As leaders, we must consider the ripple effect of our actions. Are we going to radiate selfishness, complacency and negativity? Or will we reach for a worthwhile purpose greater than ourselves and choose to inspire positivity, connectivity and hope in those around us? ?

 

Donna Rae Smith is a guest blogger for Smart Business. She is the founder and CEO of Bright Side Inc., a transformational change catalyst company that has partnered with more than 250 of the world’s most influential companies. For more information, visit www.bright-side.com or contact Donna Rae Smith at donnarae@bright-side.com

Published in Akron/Canton