Florida (1036)

If you are an entrepreneur, and you see what you think is a growth opportunity, you may be tempted to take the advice that’s been offered many times: risk all you can and jump in head first.

But if you catch your breath, the proper decision at that time is not really what to do. Your analysis lies more with if you think the opportunity is one for growth.

With that in mind, Smart Business interviewed some of the world’s greatest entrepreneurs and the leadership at EY about growth opportunities. These business leaders come from the more than 60 countries at the recent EY World Entrepreneur Of The Year conference in Monte Carlo.

 

“We’re looking at China and other Asian countries. The key to that market is to have big internationals that are creating value for their communities where we can sell our products. These are the kind of countries, those that can generate big internationals, that we are looking at.”

Martin Migoya, CEO, Globant

Entrepreneur Of The Year 2012 Argentina

 

“I have been tracking where I see money going. Where is the most foreign direct investment happening? Africa is clearly one. In South America, Colombia has been coming much more into its own, as have Indonesia and parts of Southeast Asia. Those are some of the markets you’ll start to see. Mexico is another one you have to watch because it’s close to the U.S. and its leaders have had change in their political landscape to be more pro-business.”

Herb Engert, Americas Strategic Growth Markets Leader, EY

 

“One of the ways that we encourage innovation is we partner with a lot of technology startup companies. We look for alliances and what’s next in technology that can drive improvements and enhancements in our industry.

When we see a technology that’s promising we’ll start working with them and provide them with real-world market feedback. That gives us the data and confidence to help them get to commercial deployment.

Our people are always looking for innovative ways to do things with the discipline of knowing that at Chevron we have to represent our brand and stand behind everything that we do and our customers expect us to keep them on that proven level of technology.”

Jim Davis, President, Chevron Energy Solutions

 

“I am in one of the newest economic blocs to emerge from Latin America, the Pacific Alliance, which seeks to create a Latin American gateway to Asian markets. Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru are members. The bloc hopes to make the commercial, economic and political forces among the members work more closely together.

The entrepreneurs representing Colombia chose me to be in that alliance two years after it was founded. What it is going to do is to join the market of those five countries — it is one market for everyone.”

Mario Hernandez, founder and president, Marroquinera

Entrepreneur Of The Year 2012 Colombia

 

“There continue to be tremendous opportunities in Brazil; it’s a big country, a big market. It will be back on the world stage even more with the 2014 World Cup and ultimately the Summer Olympics in 2016.

But when you look at Spanish-speaking countries, certainly Mexico is attracting a lot of direct foreign investment. The new administration, the federal government there, has definitely got a strong commitment to entrepreneurship.

We are seeing that as being important to them, and we are working with them on a number of different initiatives as the U.S. State Department and others try to help foster more entrepreneurial startups and more entrepreneurial growth in Mexico, both big and small.”

Bryan Pearce, Americas Director, Entrepreneur Of The Year and Venture Capital Advisory Group, EY

 

“There are always things you can do to improve and grow your business. You should be rethinking and retooling it every chance you get. The key thing is making sure everybody in the organization understands the story, where you’re going, are you going to get there in the belief that you are doing the right thing. People want to know their purpose, so that’s for me the biggest area to keep the energy going — keep a sense of purpose very strong.”

Dr. Alan Ulsifer, CEO, president and chair, FYidoctors

Entrepreneur Of The Year 2012 Canada

 

“Always be seeking new opportunity. Always be looking for new technologies, innovation and creativity within your people. The best ideas within our business have come from the people inside our company. You have to give opportunity to your people. Tell them it’s OK to be wrong and make mistakes. That’s important so people will learn from those mistakes and come up with better ideas.”

Lorenzo Barrera Segovia, founder and CEO, Banco BASE

Entrepreneur Of The Year 2012 Mexico

 

“The growth driver in the world is coming from entrepreneurs. They are the ones driving economic growth and driving job growth. If you look at leading indices of companies, they churn much more rapidly than they ever did before.

“It used to take 20 years to have a half of a churn in some of these indices. Now it takes four or five years. It’s because the entrepreneurs are building businesses so quickly. We have to keep investing and keep recognizing their strengths.”

Jim Turley, retired global chairman and CEO, EY

 

“It’s important to understand where the trends are going. So communication and information is important. I fully support the free market system. It’s a great way to understand where the best new ideas are coming from and where the value lies. We keep an eye on our competitors on technology and on alternative learning aspects. So to the extent that the web provides a better way to educate more students more efficiently, we’ll be using that.”

J.C. Huizenga, founder, National Heritage Academies

 

“I built the company based on people, not with experience from before, but willing to learn and try anything. We had a bunch of people that had never done this before. None of us had run companies. None of us had worked in high levels of companies. None of us were from Fortune 500s.

“Whatever you look for in people to bring them into a company — none of us had it. Most of the people came in from an entry-level position and now they’re leading departments. Chobani not only became a business that grew, but Chobani was like a school to us, including myself.”

Hamdi Ulukaya, founder, president and CEO, Chobani Inc.

Entrepreneur Of The Year 2012 United States and 2013 World Entrepreneur Of The Year

 

“Companies attracted by the Latin American market have to decide where to establish the operations in Latin America. They have many opportunities: Sao Paulo; Buenos Aires; Santiago, Chile; or maybe in Peru. But in Uruguay, there is a very small market. You have to operate with a different concept, much like an offshore company, to operate in Latin America.”

Orlando Dovat, founder and CEO, Zonamerica

Entrepreneur Of The Year 2012 Uruguay

Another year of EY’s Entrepreneur Of The Year Awards has come and gone, but the stories told and the lessons learned are far from over. Each year EY’s entrepreneurial programs get bigger and better and the entrepreneurs involved are getting more creative and leading more impressive companies than in prior years.

For instance, Hamdi Ulukaya, the founder and CEO of Chobani Inc., was named Entrepreneur Of The Year 2012 U.S. He went on to win 2013 World Entrepreneur Of The Year, making him only the second entrepreneur from the U.S. to win the world award.

This summer Smart Business caught up with a few of EY’s leaders, Herb Engert, Americas Strategic Growth Markets Leader, and Bryan Pearce, Americas Director of the Entrepreneur Of The Year Program, to discuss how these programs have evolved and talk about some new ones that are being developed.

It should be noted that EY itself is going through a leadership transition with the retirement of Jim Turley, global chairman and CEO. Smart Business spoke with him as well to understand the future direction of the company.

Here’s what we learned.

How are you effectively developing a seamless global leadership transition?

Turley: We announced Mark Weinberger was going to be my successor well over a year ago, probably 14 or 15 months ago. It was interesting because unlike many of our competitors who do this very quickly, we realize this is a really important transition.

The reason we gave ourselves 15 months of transition is because we’ve got 170,000-plus people around the world. So we take our time; we do this well.

How do you see your legacy?

Turley: If there is a legacy it’s our people culture. We’re a special place. More experienced folks join EY from our competitors than ever leave us to join the competitors. They come and they say it’s because of the culture we have.

What is one of the greatest marketing challenges moving forward?

Turley: Everybody has realized now, much later than we realized some 34 years ago, that the growth driver in the world is coming from entrepreneurs. They are the ones driving economic growth. They are the ones driving job growth.

I think we have to keep investing in and keep recognizing their strengths. But we don’t do this for our own marketing. We do this because of the impact entrepreneurs are having in the communities where they live, and they weren’t getting the attention in the press when we started the program some 27 years ago. Increasingly they are getting the visibility they need.

How did the issues discussed at the WEOY program relate to what’s going on in the U.S.?

Engert: They’re directly correlated. Everybody is talking around the issues and challenges in the world economy, which is growth, jobs, investment and innovation.

When I think about innovators and some of the companies that have come through the EY programs, they are companies that are disrupting, or said in another way, addressing a need, demand or service. In some cases in emerging markets they are replicating what might have already been met in another developed market.

That whole concept of replication and foreign direct investment, at the root of it, is what entrepreneurs are all about and it’s going to bring parody to the global world. A stage like WEOY puts it in perspective and how it’s all tied together.

Pearce: The companies that are here have been successful in growing their companies perhaps in their domestic or regional markets and this gives them a great opportunity to meet counterparts that are operating in other parts of the world. At a minimum, they may learn a little bit more about those markets. Ideally, they may meet people who are potential partners, strategic relationship candidates or people who could help them in some way to expand their own business into expanding foreign markets.

How do you plan to apply the information gained in the WEOY program into the Strategic Growth Forum this fall?

Pearce: The WEOY and the series of strategic growth forums that we do around the world are definitely part of getting knowledge to entrepreneurs as well as networks to entrepreneurs. When you bring those two things together, they learn more about how they can grow their business, run a better business, access capital and develop their people.

It’s a focus on the five important pillars around customers and growth: people, operating effectively, capital and managing risk. You get insights into that here and you’ll get insights into them at strategic growth forums.

How has the program content developed with WEOY?

Pearce: We have added a lot of content to what has historically been a program only focused on awards. That knowledge and greater focus on networking with each other obviously has been well received by the entrepreneurs. They came to WEOY to meet their colleagues, but also to learn and so we had people coming in as keynote speakers and panelists.

We have also created a series we are calling E exchanges, which are groups of 10 to 15 people sitting around the table with common issues. These E exchanges will be very helpful for people to get to know each other and to really get into some of the down and dirty, nitty-gritty of what they are doing to tackle problems in their own business.

Are there any particular countries where you see big opportunity?

Engert: I have been tracking where I see money going. Where is the most foreign direct investment happening? Africa is clearly one. In South America, Colombia has been coming much more into its own, as have Indonesia and parts of Southeast Asia. Those are some of the markets you’ll start to see. Mexico is another one you have to watch because it’s close to the U.S. and its leaders have had change in their political landscape to be more pro-business. It’s the No. 7 GDP nation in the world.

What does the Entrepreneurial Winning Women Program mean to EY and how is it developing?

Engert: The Winning Women Program is a recognition program, but it is so much more. It really is a development program. We really focus on recognizing the women and giving them an award, but we’re putting them into an EY incubator where we give them the opportunity to participate in a lot of different aspects of thinking about the strategy of their business, their financial plans, how they approach media, branding, PR and investors.

We’ve learned a lot in the last five years of this program, and I’m proud to say we are expanding that around the globe.

Pearce: One of the recognitions that we had was that women are 48 percent of business owners in the world. They’re starting up businesses at a rate more rapid than men right now. But part of the challenge is scaling. You don’t tend to see the women-led businesses scaling as rapidly as others do.

What I think has really been the strength of the program is that there is more than just an award. There is ongoing education. They are recognized through the awards program, but also get mentoring and other skills to help them build better businesses. And then we bring them to events like WEOY.

We will have virtually all of them at the Palm Springs event in November. So they have that opportunity to get integrated in with our EOY award winners and other great entrepreneurs and find partnerships and boards of advisors and directors and various other things that can help them to scale their business.

So we began that in the U.S. We are now rolling that out to Canada and Brazil this year and looking at more rapid rollout into other countries because it is certainly a great opportunity to help support these women as they grow these businesses around the world.

What about the addition of a family business component?

Engert: The Family Business Award was put in place because family businesses are the bedrock of communities. They’re the unsung heroes.

Most private companies are family-owned businesses and a lot of public companies are actually family-owned businesses as well. A significant amount of them are multi-generation family businesses and it creates a focus on that market segment.

It’s a totally different class of business with different needs and attentions. So we are trying to celebrate family business, which will provide a lot of great learning and perspective for us.

Pearce: Our definition is that families are those at least in the second generation or beyond. Not only do you have all the same challenges that another company, private or public, would have in growing the business, but now you have this added dimension wrapped around it of family dynamics.

We try to bring them together with each other so they can learn from other families how they are handling those same kinds of challenges around family integration, succession, fundraising, liquidity, and all of those kinds of things, and then we are able to provide services to them as we look at managing through those same issues.

Across the 25 programs regionally in the U.S. we had more than 200 nominees this year that want to be considered for the family business award, which was a great start.

Can you explain a little bit about Endeavor?

Engert: We have a partnership with Endeavor. They are focused on building a better working world themselves and investing in and promoting entrepreneurs in emerging markets around the globe. The Endeavor model is wonderful because it’s entrepreneurs who are opening a local chapter, but have strong ties to the global connections of Endeavor that help bring entrepreneurs and perspectives to bear.

Endeavor is a great program and we’re proud to be partners with them. I look forward to Endeavor expanding further around the globe because they are a key difference in some of those emerging markets.

Pearce: In many of the countries that they operate in, particularly in the Americas and in Latin America, we’ve got strong relationships with our EOY program.

For example, this year is the first year that we’ve had EOY in Uruguay, and that really began as a partnership between Endeavor Uruguay and one of our former partners who is on the board. We were able to team together and the initial EOY gala was combined with the Endeavor gala. We had more than 800 people attend in year one. So it shows you the power of entrepreneurship and certainly the power of the partnership between Endeavor and EY.

Tuesday, 27 August 2013 18:48

Missed opportunities

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Nothing is more frustrating than missed opportunities — except when those missed opportunities were completely avoidable. For example, you and your organization put in the time and effort to drive prospects through the marketing funnel toward conversion. And then, when the prospect is engaged and reaches out to you, you’re not equipped to provide a timely follow-up response.

This happens entirely too often. But basic prep work on the front-end can help you avoid becoming one of those organizations whose well-planned marketing strategy is wasted.

Conversion means different things to different people. In retail, it may mean going to find a product — either online or in person. But in a different industry, it may mean that someone just wants to talk to you about helping to solve a specific problem.

Regardless of your conversion definition, the singular commonality is your ability to immediately follow up and act on the potential conversion. This is because when someone reaches out to buy a product or for help with a service, it is an emotional decision. He or she is claiming that they either need something (a product) or help with an area they do not have the expertise in.

The importance of this step in the marketing funnel is critical. Like it or not, we live in a world of instant gratification — both personally and professionally — and you must tailor your marketing efforts to accommodate it. When someone winds their way through that funnel by becoming aware of your services, having interest, and then being willing to engage and dig deeper to learn who you are, nothing kills those marketing efforts faster than failure to respond to that person.

Too often, we see conversion points that consist of a basic “email us” link on a website. It sends a note to a general email address that nobody regularly checks. Or, the company lists a phone number that reaches a general voice mail account that is rarely checked. In both scenarios, all the work required to lead a prospect to conversion is rendered moot.

Take steps to ensure conversion

So what can you do to reverse the trend and build systems that allow for more immediate conversion? Among the easiest to implement are

■  A phone number that connects with somebody who is dedicated to following up.

■  Online chat capabilities in real time

■  Marketing, through a website or other sales materials, that guarantee a 15-minute response time.

■  A well-designed form on your website that asks for four components: name, email, phone number and reason for the inquiry (any more information than that may cause prospects not to convert).

Keep it simple and swift

Many organizations simply fail to take the direct route, and as a result, they swing and miss.

Initiatives such as putting a map that points to your location as your prominent website “contact us” looks great, but how many people will actually get in their vehicle and drive over to see you?

Also, don’t underestimate the importance of offering multiple ways for people to reach you for a swift response. When it comes to today’s marketing funnel, there is no effective one-size-fits-all approach.

For example, let’s say you’re looking to refinance your house or buy a new one. This is an emotional decision. You do your research and find a company that you believe will offer the best possible rates. You reach out to them. And then, you don’t hear back for days. What happens? You lose interest.

But now, consider the result when you reach out to a company and get a return response within 10 to 15 minutes.

First, you get the information you need to make a decision. More importantly, though, that company has forged an emotional connection with you because they were responsive to your needs.

It is this emotional connection that can be highly effective in closing the final piece of the marketing funnel — conversion. And, if your organization’s marketing strategy includes optimizing your marketing spend, why would you ever overtly waste money by failing to have an effective — and immediate — follow-up process in place?

 

David Fazekas is vice president of digital marketing for Smart Business Network. Reach him at dfazekas@sbninteractive.com or (440) 250-7056.

Wednesday, 28 August 2013 02:34

F.U. or else!

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Calm down … those two letters in the headline are not what you might be thinking. However, it got your attention, for this leads to an important subject.

When you, or those with whom you work, don’t follow the principles of these two letters, problems occur. Not doing what these initials represent can be the difference between success and failure, cost big money, create disappointment and actually ruin relationships.

Hopefully by now you’ve figured out that F.U. stands for Follow Up. This skill is central to achieving objectives, supporting your people or customers, and maintaining your credibility. Too many people just don’t get it and consistently fail to make F.U. a part of their business regimen.

Words are cheap, but it’s action that makes the difference. Many promises are made every day such as: “I’ll get the answer and return your call soon,” or “My person will call your person so that we can get together.” Good intentions aside, if one does not make note of it, the call just might never happen.

Fortunately, only a relatively few get hit by locomotives because trains are big and people see them coming, but many are stung by bees. That’s the same with following up. Virtually no one would forget to pick up the big order, or neglect to attend a huge meeting, but too many let the smaller, yet important, matters slip through the cracks. This not only affects the person who didn’t receive what was promised, but also could significantly impede productivity.

As an example, an associate is to provide needed information first thing in the morning. Breakfast comes and goes and as the lunch hour approaches people along the line are sitting on their hands waiting. Do the math; count up what that could cost your business day in and day out. Frantically, and with a high degree of disgust, you track down the tardy offender and are appalled by the response, “Oh, sorry, it just slipped my mind. I forgot to write it down.” Sure, this can happen once but by the second or third time it becomes a pattern and the credibility of the perpetrator can be lost.

Following up is a reflection of respect. When people don’t have the courtesy of doing what they say, you begin to wonder if they can ever do it. In my companies, all those with whom I work quickly become aware of my sacrosanct F.U. policy.

Essentially after every meeting, whether a one-on-one or with a group, I assign a date for my own purposes of when what was discussed is to take place. If it was a task of significance, the date would be agreed upon with those who had to do the work.

When new employees receive a memo from me, with the unexpected “F.U.” initials in the bottom left-hand corner, many are initially stunned, thinking I’m giving them a crude ultimatum or don’t think much of their work. Fortunately, those with a modicum of common sense quickly realize that these two letters are not a pejorative as they are always followed by a numeric string that even a newbie can figure out represents a date.

I remind my team that I do not want to be their father or their baby sitter. Instead, when I ask that something be done by a certain date, and everyone involved agrees, it must happen.

Alternatively, the person assigned the task could always come back and say he or she can’t meet the deadline, don’t know how to do what was being asked, need help with the issue, or had figured out a better alternative. What could not happen is for the person assigned the task to pretend that no follow-up was required, or worse, that the covenant was never agreed upon.

Because so few follow up as promised, this presents your business with an outstanding opportunity to rise above others and create a rock-solid reputation for saying what you’ll do and then doing what you say. All it takes is a little discipline and respect for those with whom you work. It’s better to carry around a little string for your finger than run the risk of finding the proverbial rope around your neck as a result of errors of omission.

 

Michael Feuer co-founded OfficeMax in 1988, starting with one store and $20,000 of his own money. During a 16-year span, Feuer, as CEO, grew the company to almost 1,000 stores worldwide with annual sales of approximately $5 billion before selling this retail giant for almost $1.5 billion in December 2003. In 2010, Feuer launched another retail concept, Max-Wellness, a first of its kind chain featuring more than 7,000 products for head-to-toe care. Feuer serves on a number of corporate and philanthropic boards and is a frequent speaker on business, marketing and building entrepreneurial enterprises. “The Benevolent Dictator,” a book by Feuer that chronicles his step-by-step strategy to build business and create wealth, published by John Wiley & Sons, is now available. Reach him with comments at mfeuer@max-wellness.com.

Wednesday, 28 August 2013 06:24

Ready, set, think

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Thinkers solve problems.

Mark Zuckerberg found a better way to connect people with friends and family through Facebook. Larry Page and Sergey Brin invented a better way to search the Internet by creating Google. Steve Jobs showed us a better way to obtain and listen to music through the invention of the iPod.

None of these examples happened by luck. Each of these great thinkers spent a lot of time working to perfect their ideas. Great thinkers are not born, they are made.

To create great products and services, you have to develop the habit of expanding your thought processes and critical thinking skills. Why? Because the human mind tends to be lazy. It tends to repeat the same thoughts unless it’s trained to explore new ideas. Great thinkers put in the effort to analyze things in new ways and not accept the norm.

We live in a negative society where bad news trumps good news and the potential downsides of an idea outshine the potential rewards. It takes a lot of effort to retrain our minds to focus on the positives and the solutions rather than the ramifications of a failed idea.

Becoming a great thinker requires an investment of time; there are no shortcuts. You have to be organized and plan for it. Take time to think about the problems unique to your business or industry. Work through the pros and cons of any idea, looking for a way to make it work. Study competing companies and leaders and gain an understanding of how they think. It’s also helpful if you always do your heavy thinking in the same location, and it doesn’t have to be anything fancy. Some people do their best thinking in the shower or over a cup of coffee at a cafe.

But there is one major pitfall to avoid: Don’t equate change with new thinking. Just because you are changing something does not mean you are being a creative thinker. There might be several “accepted” ways of doing something within your industry, and changing from one of the accepted ways to the other isn’t doing anything different. The goal is to identify new ways of thinking and as a result, find a new solution to a problem that no one has thought of before.

Finding these unique solutions won’t be easy, but success never is. 

Imagine it’s a hot day. You’re thirsty and hungry, but don’t want anything unhealthy. There aren’t many options available to meet all those needs. In the early ’70s, the concept of the smoothie was born out of this unmet need. Opened in 1973, Smoothie King Franchises Inc. was the original smoothie brand.

In 2001, Wan Kim had this same urge to find a healthy option to quench his thirst and satisfy his hunger. He had his first experience with a Smoothie King smoothie while studying at University of California at Irvine. The high quality, healthy product had him hooked immediately.

Kim was so impacted by the product that he became a Smoothie King franchisee in South Korea. Since 2003 he has owned several Smoothie King franchises, and in 2012 when the opportunity came about to own the brand, he jumped at the chance.

“I bought the company in July 2012,” says Kim, Global CEO. “I really love this brand. It’s not because I’m the owner, but because we have great products. There are a lot of changes still happening, but it’s exciting.”

Smoothie King, a 300-employee, more than $230 million organization, is now 40 years old. The brand has more than 700 stores and a presence in the United States, Korea and Singapore. Despite the company’s established age and fairly big size, a new owner and plenty of potential market opportunity leave the brand in growth mode today.

“Our next five-year growth plan is to open 1,000 stores in the U.S. and 500 outside the U.S.,” Kim says. “Last year the company did about 26 franchise openings. This year in the first quarter the company has done 40 to 45 signings.”

Kim’s experience as a franchisee and now a franchisor has given the company new life and Kim is excited about where he can bring the brand and its smoothies in the near future.

Here’s how Kim is spreading the word about Smoothie King in the U.S. and overseas.

 

Understand all areas of your business

Kim was a franchisee for nearly a decade in South Korea. His stores were some of the highest grossing for Smoothie King before he became CEO.

“Obviously franchisees and franchisors have some different views, but eventually the bottom line is to make a better brand,” Kim says. “The path they take can be different, so you have to keep communicating to each other and look at the bigger picture.”

Kim has a very unique advantage over numerous other franchise CEOs. He now has experience as a franchisee and a franchisor.

“I have both aspects and know what a franchise wants and needs, and I know how I need to communicate,” he says. “In any kind of business, sometimes people forget why we do it. So that’s why I keep communicating and keep telling our people why we do this business. We have a great mission and a great vision. We just have to talk about it.

“A lot of people want to make money and be comfortable and I get that and that’s very, very important, but there has to be another reason why we do this. Smoothie King is a healthy choice and our mission is to help people live a better lifestyle.”

While the company’s mission is to help people live a healthier lifestyle, Kim wanted to make sure that the company’s franchises were in good health also.

“As soon as I bought the company I looked at how many single franchisees we have, because when I was a franchisee I thought becoming a multi-unit franchisee was actually very challenging,” he says. “As a franchisor, they don’t understand what kind of challenges franchisees have when they have a second or third location.

“I started to visit some multi-unit franchisees that we have to look at what kind of system they have in place. Today, we are assembling all those systems so that whenever we have a single franchisee try to become a multi-unit franchisee we have some system to help them grow.”

Having those systems in place will become very beneficial as Kim continues to look at ways he can expand the brand.

“Right now we are in growth mode and are opening a lot of stores and also expanding into other countries,” Kim says. “When you grow, you are hiring a lot of people and when you’re expanding outside the United States you encounter different cultures. In order for me to assemble all those differences I need a really strong mission for why we do this business so that it doesn’t matter what kind of culture or background you’re from.”

 

Prepare for growth mode

Today, Kim is focused on growing the Smoothie King brand outside the U.S. and in the Southern parts of the U.S. where the company has a strong presence, but a lot of potential still remains.

“We want to make sure that we secure our market before we expand to a different part of the U.S.,” Kim says. “That expansion is happening in Florida, Texas, Georgia and other southern parts of the U.S. Going outside the United States we are looking at Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Taiwan, Japan and the Middle East. Our goal is to open two markets this year and two more markets next year.”

Fast-paced growth like Smoothie King is expecting requires a strong culture and mission that make the company attractive anywhere it goes.

“When you are in growth mode I would advise that you want to have a really strong culture in your organization, so that whomever you hire can be blended into your culture,” he says. “You have to set up a strong mission, vision and keep communicating with your employees.”

When you take your company outside of the United States you will experience a lot of cultural difference, and you have to be prepared for it.

“A lot of times when people don’t have any experience with different cultures they will think it’s wrong, but in fact it’s different,” Kim says. “In order for you to go to other countries and do business you have to learn how to respect their culture. If you don’t respect their culture they will know immediately. You have to educate your employees.”

The vast cultural differences Smoothie King employees will experience as the brand continues to expand isn’t the only change they’ll have to accept, they’ll also have to buy into the sheer amount of growth that Kim sees in the company’s future.

“A lot of times when companies grow employees don’t really see how far we can go,” he says. “When we start to grow there is a lot of work coming in and a lot of things are changing. It is very important that I need to keep communicating with employees that we can get there, because if you don’t believe we can get there, then it’s not going to happen.”

One of the first things Kim did when he bought the company was to tell the employees about the growth plan and a lot of people didn’t buy in.

“They were thinking, ‘Oh, it’s a new owner; of course he’s going to be thinking of growth, but it’s not possible,’” he says. “So I had to keep communicating that it’s going to happen and one by one, I started to show them that this would happen and then it really happened and people believed in the plan. I know there are still people who don’t believe where we can go, so I still have to communicate.”

Kim bought the company a little more than a year ago and he is having a blast seeing the company succeed little by little.

“I tell my employees to imagine if we were the size of any big fast food company, the world could be a different place,” he says. “It’s not just about making money and having success. It’s also about influencing more and more people to live a healthier lifestyle.”

 

How to reach: Smoothie King Franchises Inc., (985) 635-6973 or www.smoothieking.com

Thursday, 15 August 2013 12:01

How top global entrepreneurs turn vision into reality

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Recently, I had the privilege of attending the EY World Entrepreneur Of The Year conference in Monte Carlo. I’m back to report that entrepreneurship is alive and thriving around the globe! 

It was a whirlwind of a trip, packed with networking, thought-provoking panel discussions and personal interviews. We heard from a remarkable panel of speakers including Kofi Annan, former Secretary General of the United Nations and Nobel Peace Prize recipient; Sir Timothy Berners-Lee, inventor of the World Wide Web; John Cleese, award-winning actor, author, humorist and Monty Python legend; and many more. 

I also had the opportunity to sit down with some of the world’s most accomplished entrepreneurs. These business leaders come from more than 60 countries that combined represent a staggering 94 percent of the global economy.

In this issue and in the months to come, you’ll learn what the world’s greatest entrepreneurs have to say about leadership, innovation, overcoming challenges, bringing their visions to life and much, much more. You’ll also hear from the leadership at EY as to the importance of celebrating entrepreneurship.

 

Transforming vision into reality

 

“Be careful about making assumptions. Those assumptions can lead you down a pretty dangerous path. It is OK to make assumptions and have confidence but you had better do your due diligence as well. An assumption is having those critical for the business make sure it is happening. I am very trusting of people and in the past have had some unfortunate instances where I did make assumptions about something and they were completely the wrong assumptions.”

Dr. Alan Ulsifer, CEO, president and chair of FYidoctors

 

“Growth obviously continues to be a challenge. The markets demand growth if you are a publicly traded company, and growth is a metric of how the business is doing. If you want to continue to attract the best people, attract the right sources of capital to your business, you have to demonstrate that things are going well and growth is one measure that people look to. I think that if you are a business in an established market, growth can be a challenge because those markets by and large are growing more slowly. So in order to get more rapid growth, many companies are looking at emerging markets and trying to figure out what their strategy should be for emerging markets, those that have double-digit growth potential.”

Bryan Pearce, Americas Director, Entrepreneur Of The Year and Venture Capital Advisory Group EY

 

“One of the toughest things for me was that people have a certain image of my country, Colombia. They don’t trust a company there to have good quality and do good work, but I am very proud to offer those qualities from Colombia. It is not easy but it is something that you can accomplish. I have been down a lot of times, but the good thing I have noticed is that every time something like that happened, I have been able to obtain positive things out of it. I have been broke multiple times, but from being broke I have been able to learn from it and rebuild.

Mario Hernandez, founder and president, Mario Hernandez

 

Jim Turley leaves his post as Global Chairman and CEO for EY with deep admiration for the entrepreneurs who continue to use their vision and spirit of innovation to change the world.

“They have got this wonderful ability to think outside themselves, to look at the world outside these windows and see the needs that exist out there,” says Turley, who officially retired on July 1.

“Then they’ve got a vision to create a product or service or an idea to meet the need they have seen. They have got the courage to risk everything and they are as persistent as can be. Most of them fail the first time out. But they get up, clean themselves off and do it again.”

 

“Work carefully with a few people who get a twinkle in their eye. If you talk about your idea, some people will respond with excitement because they get it, but not everybody. Maybe you talk to 300 people and three people will get it. Work with those three people. The web took off because a few people all over the world got it. You get the support from a few people who get it and then it builds from there.”

Sir Tim Berners-Lee, creator of the World Wide Web

 

Corey Shapoff has a job that many would envy, booking well-known musical acts such as Maroon 5, Katy Perry, Christina Aguilera and Kelly Clarkson for live concerts and private corporate events. But he doesn’t take much time to stop and think about all the famous people on his call list.

“I’m a grinder,” says Shapoff, president and founder of SME Entertainment Group. “I’m the kind of guy who is always looking to what’s next. You’re only as good to me as your last deal.”

It’s that instinctual drive to always try to do it better that is embedded in the true entrepreneur and allows the next vision to become a reality.

“It’s hard for me to turn it off and say, ‘That’s great,’” Shapoff says. “I’m always thinking about tomorrow. You just can’t take things for granted in our business.”

 

“The skill sets of an entrepreneur involve understanding how to create business. So if you’re going to give back, why not work with kids who need it the most and actually teach them and help them to be entrepreneurs. That’s what is going to grow our economy and create stability where otherwise we’re going to have a lot of social unrest.”

Amy Rosen, president and CEO, Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship

 

“When you’re an entrepreneur you feel like you have never met a deal that you didn’t like. You only have limited resources and limited time to be successful. You have to stay disciplined and focused and being able to say what we are not is every bit as important as being able to say what we are.”

Jim Davis, president, Chevron Energy Solutions

 

“It’s important that you have teamwork and all your top players are well motivated with passion, principles and values. We make sure that people know where we are going and what our main objective is for that year. We promote teamwork inside and outside the company. Our directors have to make sure they are sharing our company values and principles with each of their team members.”

Lorenzo Barrera Segovia, founder and CEO, Banco Base

 

“For entrepreneurs you get a great idea, you start your business and then you have to keep focused. Keep executing that idea if that idea is big enough. Never fall into the temptation of getting out of your business or change it unless it’s strategic. Secondly, try to get financing as late as you can. Never get financing as soon as you can. Thirdly, create a great team and culture, because that’s what will prevail and create value for shareholders and your community. That’s how you scale your business. The last one is to dream big.”

Martin Migoya, CEO, Globant

 

“It was nothing but a gut feeling. The only thing I knew was there was a big opportunity in yogurt. I grew up with yogurt. Being from Turkey yogurt was a big part of our diet. I wasn’t sure if I could do it – break through in the world of yogurt in retail.

The category was owned by two major companies; Dannon and Yopliat owned about 70 percent of the market, and they had been there for years. As a startup you go to the specialty stores first. That’s how you start and you grow and once you reach a certain level then you go to the big retailers.

I didn’t want to do that. I wanted to go to the big retailers and be in the regular dairy aisle. That was a crazy idea and nobody thought that would go, but at least we tried. When we tried, we convinced one retailer in New York, ShopRite. The result from that was we were able to expand to a couple of other retailers. After the second or third customer that we had success with for our yogurt, I knew it wasn’t going to be about selling, it was about making enough.”

Hamdi Ulukaya, founder, president and CEO, Chobani Inc.

One of my favorite business books, which also made it as a Broadway play and a big-screen movie, is “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz,” written by L. Frank Baum in 1900. My hero in this story is not the young orphaned Dorothy, nor the Cowardly Lion, the desperately in-need-of-some WD-40 Tin Man, nor even the Scarecrow in search of a brain.

Instead it is the Wizard. To understand why the dubious Wizard is my favorite character, one must get past the portrayal of him as scheming, phony and at times nasty.

To appreciate the man behind the curtain, recognize that he is a very effective presenter, though at times this ex-circus performer behaved a bit threatening. OK, he was a jerk, but the point of this column is to take you down the yellow brick road on the way to the enchanted Emerald City and corporate success.

From this tale there is a lesson that one can say all sorts of things, not be visible, and yet still have a meaningful impact.

Another takeaway is that playing this role provides plausible deniability. This absence of visual recognition is particularly beneficial in negotiating when you, as the boss, use a vicar, aka a mouthpiece, to speak on your behalf. This allows you to have things said to others that you as the head honcho could never utter without backing yourself into a corner.

Another plus is you can always throw your mouthpiece under the bus if necessary, of course, with his or her upfront understanding that sometimes there must be a sacrificial lamb. This is not only character-building for your stand-in, but also many times presents an unprecedented opportunity for him or her to learn in real time.

Perhaps the Wizard was the first behind-the-curtain decision-maker, but today this role is used frequently in business and government. In a similar vein, the “voice” of Charlie from the well-known 1970s TV series “Charlie’s Angels” was always heard, but he was never seen.

Frequently there is much to be said for using anonymity to float a trial balloon just to get a reaction. Think about a son having his mom test the waters by talking to dad before the son tells him he wants to drop out of junior high school to join the circus. Maybe that’s even how our former circus-drifter-turned-Wizard-of-Oz got his start.

In the negotiating process it is important to have a fallback when the talks hit a rough patch by instructing your vicar to backpedal, saying that he or she has just talked to the chief and the benevolent boss said, “I was overreaching with my request.”

This also serves to build a persona for the boss-behind-the-curtain as someone who is fair-minded and flexible. All the while, of course, it’s the boss who is calling the shots and maneuvering through the process without getting his or her hands dirty.

The value of using this clean-hands technique is that it enables the real decision-maker to come in as the closer who projects the voice of reason, instead of the overeager hard charger who at times seems to have gone rogue.

It actually takes a bigger person to play a secondary role behind the curtain rather than always be in the limelight. It also takes a hands-on coach and counselor to maneuver a protégé through the minefields to achieve the objective.

However, accomplishing the difficult tasks through others is true management and the No. 1 job of a leader who must be a master teacher.

After you have guided a handful of up-and-comers a few times through thorny negotiations, you will gain much more satisfaction than if you had done it yourself, while engendering the respect and gratitude of your pupils. They in turn will have learned by doing, even though they were not really steering the ship alone.

The final step is to let the subordinate take credit for getting the big job done. This will also elevate you to rock star status, at least in his or her eyes. Soon those who you’ve taught will emerge as teachers too, and the big benefit is that you will populate your organization with a stellar team of doers, not just watchers.

So, forget about the Wicked Witch of the West and move backstage for the greater good of the organization. 

Thursday, 15 August 2013 07:28

Make it count

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A few years ago, one of my friends embarked on what he deemed an ambitious, yet simple plan: Write a New York Times Best Seller.

“Ed” had reason to be optimistic: His first two books had sold well and he had successfully leveraged them to launch a burgeoning consulting practice. Ed also had a nationally known book publisher to handle distribution for this book, and he had developed a comprehensive marketing and promotions plan for the launch.

Ed felt all the pieces were in place and was sure he would succeed. His goals were two-fold: break out from the pack and grow his business, and hit the New York Times Best Seller’s list. While his head told him the first goal was more realistic, his heart was set on the second — publicly claiming it was his only true benchmark of success.

Needless to say, Ed’s book didn’t make the list. Few books do. That doesn’t mean Ed’s book was a failure. Quite the contrary, it was a huge success.

As a result of Ed’s book, he landed numerous speaking engagements with organizations and companies around the world. He began to command four- and five-figure speaking fees from those engagements, and his book was purchased and distributed to every attendee.

Further, Ed’s speaking engagements lead to dozens of private companies hiring him to provide one- and two-day seminars, where he taught executive teams how to implement the ideas he espoused in the book. Ed was also presented with numerous business opportunities for new and existing clients to tackle initiatives beyond the book’s subject matter that he had not previously considered but were related to his expertise.

Finally, Ed did sell thousands upon thousands of copies of his book in bookstores nationwide and online through booksellers like Amazon.com and BarnesAndNoble.com. His book was in the hands of the right people — and lots of them — and he had established a national profile.

Viewed through this lens, there is little doubt that Ed’s book was wildly successful — even if it wasn’t a New York Times Best Seller and even if it didn’t stack up to his primary benchmark.

This is the reality of book publishing. Each month, I speak with dozens of entrepreneurs and CEOs about their nascent book ideas and the possibility of having Smart Business Books handle development and publication of their stories and manuscripts. I begin every conversation the exact same way: “If your goal is to have a New York Times Best Seller, we’re not the right option for you.”

That’s because you should write books for the right reasons. If your only goal is getting on a best-seller’s list, then your ambitions are off the mark. Writing and publishing a book is not like a professional sports team’s season — there isn’t one winner who takes the championship and a bunch of losers who fall short. Publishing a book is not an all-or-nothing proposition.

This isn’t to say you shouldn’t aim high with your goals, and having your book become a best-seller is certainly one way to measure success. Setting reasonable expectations, however, is essential.

So why write a book?

One of the most important questions you should be able to answer when thinking about writing a book is, “Who is going to read it and why?”

As Ed’s story demonstrates, a book is a very useful business development tool. It is an immediate conversation starter, an excellent credibility builder and one heck of a leave-behind. If you’re engaged in marketing, why not capture your expertise through a book?

Another reason is to celebrate a milestone or establish a legacy piece. It could be for a 50th or 100th anniversary, or to recognize the history of an organization upon the founder’s retirement or death.

And, if you are interested in helping others succeed, a book is a great way to share your expertise or what makes you and your organization special. For example, if you’ve built an amazing corporate culture where productivity blossoms and innovation flourishes, the “how” and “why” are good subjects for a book. And if you’ve been involved with several mergers and acquisitions, consider sharing what worked and what didn’t, and the lessons learned along the way.

Whatever your story, the key is having a reason to share it with others. The bottom line: It’s your story. Make it count.

Four years ago, Jorge Gonzalez didn’t have to be told that economic factors were not conducive for banks to report good earnings. There were indicators everywhere: the economy was weak, the real estate market was weak, interest rates were down and regulatory costs were up.

While those uncontrollables made it challenging to reposition City National Bank of Florida, of which he was president and later CEO, Gonzalez had a plan. And it worked. Last year, the bank had the best year in its history. Net income was $190.2 million, compared to $34.4 million in 2011. Revenue for 2012 was $190 million.

The success caught the eye of several suitors, and Banco de Credito e Inversiones of Chile purchased City National Bank in May from Bankia of Spain for $882.8 million, which was 1½ times its book value.

Gonzalez’s plan centered on having the right foundation in place to create the scalability and the proper infrastructure to support growth.

“You can’t just start to grow organizations,” he says. “So many times when we run across companies that have very good growth plans on the top line relative to how they are going to acquire new business, they haven’t necessarily thought through how they are going to be able to absorb and manage it once it is in the door.”

Gonzalez also issues a caveat. There is more to a plan than words on a piece of paper.

“You can have the best business plan in the world but if you don’t have the right people to execute the plan, you’re not going to get home. You’re not going to be able to get across the finish line.”

Here is how Gonzalez made sure the foundation of the organization, the backbone, the people and the technology were all in place and had the scalability to create a larger organization. 

Build a rock-solid foundation

There is an undeniable benefit to having an organization’s foundation in place before successful growth can occur. Gonzalez envisioned a simple “if-then” approach.

“This allowed us to do two things,” he says. “No. 1, accelerate the growth because we were ready to take it on, and No. 2, navigate the less-than-easy landscape economically because the different ingredients were in place that were necessary to be able to execute our plan.”

When you are about to build the foundation, identify the empirical formulas.

“The foundation to any business is, No. 1, people,” he says. “In our business, I like to say that our money is not any greener. It is about having the right people in the right seats.

“So we spend a lot of time making sure that we have people who have the right skill sets, the right experience, and very importantly, are willing to operate within our culture.

“It is one thing to hire good people, but if they don’t fit into the organization’s culture, then ultimately you don’t have people performing at high levels.”

When repositioning a company, you need to have the strength and presence to lead you through some turnover.

“We had turnover of probably 50 percent of our employee base over the last four years as we’ve repositioned the company,” Gonzalez says. “But the 50 percent turnover was intentional. Sometimes the people that were in our organization had the right skill sets for the company at that period of time, but may not have had the right skill sets for the company that we were trying to build and the objectives that we are trying to reach three or four years later.

“It is just too important of a factor to not deal with.”

As for the “50 percenters” who made the grade, they need to understand how the culture has been redefined. The values need to be clearly defined and presented in a bottom-up approach.

“I wanted everybody to participate in trying to define and agree to what that culture should be,” Gonzalez says. “We made that a very critical component of the things that were in our plan that we needed to work on.”

The effort should be about defining the culture, having engagement, and everybody making that decision and sticking to it, he says.

“I think a lot of organizations do a good job of talking about core values. They do a good job about talking about culture, but then in the execution of that, it is lost.” 

Empower and measure

Empowerment is a big part of culture because people need to be empowered to take a sense of ownership of their respective businesses. Culture in many ways is the motivational quotient that may be the difference between business success and failure.

“The leader needs to be able to delegate the decision-making and the authority to the people who are executing the jobs day in and day out,” Gonzalez says. “Give them the ability to make decisions within certain parameters. Outside of those parameters, then we need to have a sit-down conversation. But they need to feel empowered to be able to go run the business.”

Another way to look at the parameters is to think of them as guardrails.

“We kind of set guardrails for ourselves,” he says. “In other words, we want to operate within these rails so we give people the leadership to say, ‘Hey, between these ranges, go do your thing.’”

It is essential to have measurable objectives that you want to accomplish over a period of time.

“I am a big believer in that if you don’t measure things, they typically don’t happen,” he says. “So that is also part of going back to culture. Each line of business has key performance indicators and metrics that we focus on because, again, if you can’t go back and assess or measure relative to what you set out to do, then how do you assess whether you are able to accomplish that or not?”

Write into your culture a goal of adaptability, about how important it is to be flexible.

“If you are not adapting, not changing, I think you are almost falling backward,” Gonzalez says. “Part of our core values is embracing change. We have to be able to adapt, and our plan can’t be so rigid that it doesn’t allow us to adapt with whatever uncontrollable wolves are out there.”

Much of the culture is really just about standard operating procedures.

“There is nothing I’m talking about here that is exotic in its execution,” Gonzalez says. “It is more about executing simple blocking and tackling techniques and how to operate a business.

“But sometimes people get lost in the complexities and forget about the basics. So focus on things that are really creative to the organization, things that really move the needle, and try to execute those to the best of your capability.” 

Stress accountability

When accountability is discussed when talking about an organization, it also means employees being accountable to each other. Its value rivals that of family bonds.

“You are part of a team,” Gonzalez says. “If you are not doing your job, you are letting the company down, but you are also letting down everybody else around you.”

Try to make sure people understand that their contribution to your plan is key to the success of everyone else around them.

“If they truly believe in the culture and that they are part of this big family, then they are letting the family down,” he says. “Your job is to create that accountability both from a leadership standpoint but also from a peer standpoint so that everybody feels there is a responsibility to the best of their capability.”

Accountability comes in many different forms. Gonzalez uses a lot of real-time coaching, assessing and a lot of feedback.

“We take the opportunity when we see somebody doing something right to recognize them right away,” he says. “When we see somebody who needs help, we want to deal with that situation right away. I think sometimes there is a tendency to want to put that on your to-do list and unfortunately, you never get to that list.”

To make the feedback process as successful as it can be, it should be a continual process.

“It’s not just a once-a-year process whereby people sit down for 30 minutes and get their performance review and then go back to doing what they were doing,” Gonzalez says. “We try to make it an ongoing part of the management style over the organization.

“In other words, we want people to be given real-time assessments of how they are doing. And it’s not just the things that need improvement. It’s about reinforcing the correct behaviors and the results. We spend a lot of time on that.”

For the underperformers, you may either coach them up or coach them out, but always prepare for the unexpected.

“Make sure you always have a list of people that you are talking to in the marketplace that are potentially good hires for the organization. If you have an unexpected departure, you don’t want to just hire quickly,” Gonzalez says. “If you are not prepared with a list of people who you have been recruiting over a period of time, then you are probably more prone to make a quick decision that may not be the best one.”

How to reach: City National Bank of Florida, (800) 435-8839 or www.citynationalcm.com

Takeaways

Build a rock-solid foundation.
Empower and measure employees.
Stress accountability among workers and management.

The Gonzalez File

Jorge Gonzalez
President and CEO
City National Bank of Florida

Born: Miami, Fla.

Education: I got my bachelor’s degree from Florida International University in Miami in finance and international business and am a graduate of the Kenan-Flagler Business School Executive Leadership Training program at the University of North Carolina. 

What was your first job and what did you learn from it?

My dad used to make custom kitchens for people, and that was kind of a part-time job. The one thing that it taught me was to have a significant work ethic and the discipline to make sure that the things that have to be done are done. And the other thing was that my dad always taught me that you have to take care of your client. You have to make sure that when you deliver a kitchen that it is of the quality they expect it to be.

Who do you most admire in business?

I do read a lot of former GE CEO Jack Welch’s books. He has a very simple style of management that I can relate to. I like the things that he says, and I’m not sure how much of those, depending on the business, you can execute or not. But I really admire people who are entrepreneurs and take the risk to start a business based on an idea. The luxury of my business is that I get to meet so many different business owners and listen to their stories of how they started out of their garage or just ran across a business idea and now they have this $50 million or $100 million business. The entrepreneurial spirit and perseverance and the unwillingness to give up, and the willingness to take risks to me are characteristics that I find extremely recognizable.

What is the best business advice you have ever received?

No. 1 is don’t give up; persevere. That’s from my father, Jorge Gonzalez. I don’t think there is a substitute for hard work; the relentless desire to achieve something — that cannot be replaced. Going back to people, that’s somewhat in your DNA, in my opinion. I think you have that or you don’t. It’s very hard to instill. It can be done, but it doesn’t come easy. The other thing is to always do the right thing, in other words, always take the high road. I think those are two important pieces of advice that I try to live by every day.

What is your definition of a business success?

I think so many times you measure success on your own terms, but ultimately I think the true definition of success is how your clients feel about what you are doing, and if they are sticking around. Sometimes we get too caught up in measuring our own success when really we should be asking our employees and our clients if we are being successful.