The more there is available of something, the less it costs. Conversely, when there’s a limited quantity of that same something, the more it’s coveted and the more expensive it is. This is a rudimentary concept, but few companies know how to effectively manage the process to ensure they balance supply with demand in order to maintain or improve the profitability of a product or service. Of course, before you can maximize profitability, you must have something customers want, sometimes even before they know they need it.

Think about precious metals, fine diamonds and even stocks. The beauty and a portion of the intrinsic value of these things are effectively in the eyes of the beholder. In reality, much of their value or price is determined by the ease or difficulty of obtaining them.

As for equities, as soon as everyone who can own a given stock has bought it, then, in many cases, the only direction that stock can take is down because there are simply more sellers than buyers. On the flip side, when few people own a stock but everybody decides they want it, for whatever the reason, that stock may take a precipitous upward trajectory.

A case in point is Apple. At one time, when its per-share price was more than $400, $500 and even $600, everyone thought the sky was the limit and the majority of institutional funds and many home gamers, aka small individual investors, jumped on the bandwagon. The stock reached $705 a share in the fall of 2012, and just when all of the market prognosticators were screaming, “Buy, buy, buy,” there were too few buyers left (because everyone already owned it) and the stock fell out of bed. In many respects, Apple was still the same great company with world-class products, but there were simply more sellers than buyers and — poof — the share price evaporated, sending this once high-flying growth stock to the woodshed for a real thrashing.

The question for your business is how can you manage the availability of your goods or services to maximize profit margins? The oversimplified answer is once you have something of value, make sure that you create the appropriate amount of tension, be it requiring a waiting list to obtain the product or service or underproducing the item to create a backlog. However, this is a delicate balancing act, because if it’s too hard to get, then customers will quickly find an alternative, and your product will become yesterday’s news.

Some very high-end fashion houses, such as Chanel, have it down to a science. It can be very difficult to walk into a marquis retailer today and obtain one of its satchels without being made to jump through waiting-game hoops, just for the privilege of giving the store your money in exchange for the fancy schmancy bag. That stimulates demand and keeps the price up because customers tend to want something they can’t seem to get.

Michael Feuer co-founded OfficeMax in 1988, starting with one store and $20,000 of his own money. During a 16-year span, Feuer, as CEO, grew the company to almost 1,000 stores worldwide with annual sales of approximately $5 billion before selling this retail giant for almost $1.5 billion in December 2003. In 2010, Feuer launched another retail concept, Max-Wellness, a first of its kind chain featuring more than 7,000 products for head-to-toe care. Feuer serves on a number of corporate and philanthropic boards and is a frequent speaker on business, marketing and building entrepreneurial enterprises. Reach him with comments at mfeuer@max-wellness.com.

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Published in Akron/Canton

In the United States, workers’ compensation insurance is the second biggest cost for employers, representing a $50 billion marketplace nationwide. So when Steve Mariano built a company focused on sales of workers’ comp insurance, he knew that there was opportunity for long-term growth.

“Workers’ comp insurance — it’s not a really sexy area, but it’s been around for a long time,” says Mariano, founder, chairman, president and CEO of Fort Lauderdale-based Patriot National Insurance Group. “It’s kind of like this small brother compared to health insurance.”

But since the credit crisis, it has also become more difficult to compete in this type of insurance business. In the last three years, declining payrolls and cost cutting at many companies has inevitably affected sales for Patriot and other workers’ comp insurance providers.

“It was always a tough business, but it’s gotten a lot tougher these days,” Mariano says.

To grow, Mariano has stayed true to many of the same principles that the company was founded on in 2003, specifically a commitment to finding and developing a team of unparalleled talent.

“That’s probably been the biggest reason why we’ve been successful,” he says. “We’ve been able to attract the talented people and their skill sets and we’ve been able to train the people to do the business, follow the procedures and protocols and leverage technology the way that we at Patriot do it, different than other companies.”

As a result, the organization has had some of its best sales years despite the recession. Here’s how Mariano develops Patriot’s team of 425 employees to excel in the workers’ comp business.

Grow talent in stages

Prior to launching Patriot, Steve Mariano founded two other companies. From experience, he knew that it would be difficult to attract many strong employees with the skills they needed to grow before they got a foothold and developed a reputation in the business. To create a deep bench of talent from the beginning, it’s important to be patient about growth and not bring on people that you don’t truly need yet.

First, develop a core team of people local to your business and who you can trust to get your business off the ground.

“You’ve got to get your business plan up and running with a couple of core people in your management team that you know and have experienced working with them,” Mariano says.

Once you see growth in your business plan after a couple of years, then you have a story to use to attract corporate talent from around the country and from other fields. Bring on a strong core group and grow initial sales and then bring on a strong secondary senior team to continue to grow them.

“With each cycle that the company grows and evolves, you have to balance your ability to sell your product along with your costs,” Mariano says. “This may not be perfectly in tandem — but you can’t have one or two major years of losses coming from the expansion without balancing it out.”

By growing in stages, you can build the infrastructure to support a larger and larger team. That way, you ensure that as you go through hiring cycles that people will see you as a stable employer with a track record of growth. In addition to bringing people from out of town with certain skill sets to the corporate office, the organization has also hired hundreds of employees locally, including about 300 people in the Fort Lauderdale area.

“Once you get to a certain size, it becomes easier to attract talent because, number one, talent starts looking for you,” Mariano says.

By 2006 and 2007, the company’s sales growth put it in the position to hire the senior talent it needed to pull from outside of South Florida. As you add new talent, finding people who are fair and also have good ethics is equally important to finding the right skill sets. You want to hire people who are talented but also people who are ethical and going to fit within the company’s culture, much like a professional sports team.

“You can have the best talent, but if they don’t work together in the same culture, they’re not going to win,” he says. “You’ve got to find the right people that fit within the organization. It’s not just asking who is the best talent, but who is the best talent for our company.”

Mariano says that growing responsibly sometimes means taking it little bit slower than you’d like to make sure that you bring everybody with you. That’s not just in expenses but also growing the culture in a way to make sure it permeates the entire company as you add more and more people.

“Sometimes that just means taking a step back, whether it’s three months, a quarter or two quarters, and focusing back internally on the company and having internal parts of the company like accounting and legal really catch up to the growth of the company,” he says.

But while he tries to be deliberate about growing in stages, Mariano doesn’t place limits on how big the company can become as it continues to scale.

“If you pigeonhole yourself into not thinking of things as big as they can be, you’ll never get there,” he says. “You’ve got to really think about the potential and not sell yourself or your ideas short.”

Invest in training

Employee training is an area that not all business leaders invest in equally, especially in the insurance industry.

“In the insurance business, there is very little training that goes on these days, and I think it’s because of cost overhead and other things,” Mariano says. “Insurance companies don’t have the same type of training programs for young people as they used to.”

Yet training talent is an area that Mariano cites as one of the most critical elements in facilitating Patriot’s sales growth. Fundamentally, the company has had certain departments training on an informal basis for years. An example is the company’s claims management program that started in 2008.

“That type of training and that type of culture that’s been built around our business has allowed us to be successful,” Mariano says.

When you don’t invest in growing people’s skills, they could feel undervalued or feel that they don’t have a long-term future with your company. This can result in higher employee turnover, which in the end, sucks up more time and resources as you hire and train new people.

Retention is a major factor in why Mariano readily invests in employee training that others might find an unnecessary expense. Investing in your people helps your emloyees be more successful, which in turn helps your company be successful by developing and retaining talented employees.

Last year, Mariano introduced Patriot University, the company’s first formal, full-time training program to provide employees with cross-training enhance their core competencies and develop their skills. The company also collaborates with South Florida colleges to put together training opportunities for people who are interested in working for the company and want to learn some skills in advance. This creates a local pipeline of talent so that when the company hires in the future, it has a pool of candidates who already have some key skills.

“We’re proactive now in making sure that we have more than enough talent and with these training programs, making sure that we’ve got the talent and the internal operations ahead of time ready for the next big expansion,” Mariano says.

“There’s no question that we’re going to continue to grow and hire most of our people locally moving forward. That’s only gotten a lot easier.”

Because of its efforts to nurture people up through the ranks of the company, the organization now has one of the best retention rates in its industry.

“If you don’t train people, then you’re not going to keep them,” Mariano says.

“We know if you churn employees, you hire and then fire, hire and fire, it really increases your costs as a company. It’s cheaper to retain them by training them in their job functions and cross-training them in other department skills, so that as one department grows maybe faster than another, we can use their skill sets in different departments.”

Encourage innovation

In an industry with a lot of big players, Patriot’s entrepreneurial culture is one of the reasons many job seekers are drawn to work there. When you have a culture that allows people to have a more direct impact on your business, you can attract the kind of innovative thinkers that can help you grow.

“We have procedures and protocols too, but we’re always looking for our employees to find a better way to do something and to innovate within their organization and within their departments,” Mariano says.

Having an innovative culture that embraces new ways of doing things tends to attract those with the desire to succeed.

“Talent is looking for a way to put a fingerprint on the company they’re working for,” Mariano says. “If you come to work for a company like us, you can really put a fingerprint in your area and be able to look five, ten years from now and say, ‘I really had something to do with this part of the business plan and help with the building of the company.’”

By not having just standard ways of doing things, Mariano says you make it harder for employees to just come in, check a box or work a 9-to-5 just to pull a paycheck.

“We’re looking for ideas of how to better our company in all areas, from the mail room all the way up to the top financial parts of the company,” Mariano says. “If there is a better procedure and protocol or a way to innovate it to service our customers better or make us a better profit, then I ask for those types of things and very much support that type of thought process.”

As a result, the company has been a leading innovator in its field, specifically when it comes to technology. It was among the first to spearhead the use of iPhones, iPads and mobile technology to video stream information for surveillance. Being able to use the mobile devices and video streaming tools nationwide gives insurance adjusters, investigators and legal teams the ability to help employers evaluate compensation or compensability issues and make faster decisions in fraud cases.

Because fraud makes up about 20 percent of the workers’ comp cost in the United States, these advances make a big difference in helping the company differentiate itself for growth.

“Very few workers’ comp competitors really use that kind of Apple innovation on the front end to be able to be out in the field getting this information,” Mariano says.

“It’s billions of dollars being wasted each year in fraud. If you can just stop a small piece of that going on in your own companies, then that is a big thing.”

As a result, Mariano says that the company is planning its biggest expansion in the last three years. Investing in a culture and training to engage employees has helped it attract new talent as well as capture market share from its larger, but less nimble, competitors. It recently opened up offices in the Los Angeles area as well as major cities including Sacramento and St. Louis, and in 2011, the company added 85 new jobs to downtown Fort Lauderdale.

“So we’ve been an innovator,” Mariano says. “We’ve been able to come in, leverage new technologies and really come into the marketplace with a fresh set of ideas and reduce costs for the employers.”

How to reach: Patriot National Insurance Group, (954) 670-2900 or www.pnigroup.com

Takeaways

1. Be patient in your talent search.

2. Create formal training for employee development.

3. Nurture employees’ engagement in innovation.

The Mariano File

Steve Mariano

Chairman, founder, president and CEO

Patriot National Insurance Group

Born: New Jersey

Education: Georgia Tech and Ursinus College — graduated with a degree in economics.

What would your friends be surprised to find out about you?

Most people don't know I read a new book just about every week. There is so much information out there, so many experiences to benefit from.

What is one part of your daily routine that you wouldn't change?

My morning workout. Mental and physical shape are linked, and the time I spend every morning at the gym helps me clear my head, set my priorities for the day, and build the energy I need to take on the day's challenges.

What’s the toughest business decision you’ve ever had to make?

At our prior company right after 9/11, the marketplace for insurance really shrank, and I was in a situation where I had to eliminate about 85 to 100 employees just because the business model wasn’t supporting it. To me, any time you have to eliminate a position or you have to fire someone, from a leadership position, you haven’t succeeded. Any time you have to let someone go, that means you either didn’t train them correctly or they weren’t able to deliver what you thought they would be able to deliver. Or in the case when you just have a bad event like 9/11 — you just have no control over it – it’s even harder because as a CEO you have great people sometimes and there’s just nothing you can do about it.

What do you see for future growth in Florida?

I think South Florida and Florida will do a lot better over the next couple of years. I know it’s been very tough for the state in a lot of areas … and I think just given the amount of business that we’re doing with Latin and South America, and just how wonderful a state this is — no state income tax and all of that — there’s a good balance for its growth. We’re really bullish that there’s going to be better times ahead, and we look forward to being part of the community here.

Published in Florida

Vlad Shmunis built his company the old-fashioned way, one customer at a time. Starting with zero users, he’s grown RingCentral Inc. to deliver cloud-based business phone system solutions to more than 200,000 customers across three continents and employs approximately 500 people.

“It’s very clear that there is an amazing amount of demand,” says Shmunis, the founder and CEO of the San Mateo-based company. “It was at the right time, right place. So it’s just trying to hit it on all cylinders.”

To stay ahead of the competition in the business communications industry, Shmunis now looks to invest in areas that grow the business with new customers while also meeting the needs of current ones.

Smart Business spoke with Shmunis about how he invests in RingCentral’s long-term growth.

Invest in top performers.

As we’re growing, the focus is more the sense of the overall vision and culture understanding and making sure that everybody is on the same page. As far as the people we want to hire, how do we incentivize them? How do we keep them excited about what they do?

This is a constant quest. We try to have an A-team in every respect. We have well-accomplished people in the key positions. So that’s taking a lot of my time now and probably will continue for the foreseeable future as the company grows.

The slowing down of the economy did not slow our growth down and did not slow our customers’. The people that work for us have options. So how do we keep them here and productive?

Invest in infrastructure.

People understand that emphasis is on continuing to delight existing customers. So we’re not going to do anything that would jeopardize their well-being and in any way destabilize the service. We do invest a lot into the infrastructure, so we’re definitely putting our money where our mouth is. We’re running our own cloud. We invest a lot in the support systems — software and people most importantly — making sure that you have 24/7 coverage … that people will be woken up in the middle of the night whenever something serious happens.

These are people trusting us with their businesses, and if their phone line goes dead, it’s not a good thing. If things do happen, which is hopefully not a very common occurrence at this point, we have procedures that are well-defined.

Time of response is extremely important. So if there’s an outage, we will immediately post updates to the website to keep them up to speed. We are active in social media so we use Twitter. We use Facebook, our own website, anything we can to make sure that we’re not asleep at the wheel and that we’re still here and the service will be brought up as soon as humanly possible.

Invest in quality.

We make it easy for people to refer people to the service. But really the most important thing is that we’ve invested heavily into a product that will be liked. You can’t pay a person enough to have them recommend something that the person doesn’t like. The product speaks for itself. So we just make sure that it does what it’s supposed to. It does it well. It does it reliably, which is immensely important for our customer base. The rest takes care of itself.

The general position is saying, ‘Look, while we’d really to grow and take over the world and have tens of millions of customers, none of that is going to happen unless we keep our existing customers happy.’ One positive reference may bring you another lead. One negative reference can lose you 10 leads, if not more. Just continue the emphasis on quality of service.

Invest in your vision.

We’re not trying to veer out from our main task, and main task is enterprise-level communications to small businesses. We’re not trying to bring them additional services. We’re not trying to be a generic cloud platform. We’re not trying to become a broadband provider or call center operator or any of those things. Many of our competitors might be going into those tangents under the belief that there is low-hanging fruit there, and maybe there is. But I believe in focusing.

It’s fairly rare to find a world-class football player who is also a world-class baseball player. People have tried. Most of them did not succeed at the other sport after owning one sport. I feel the same thing here. If you want to be really, really good at football, play football. If you want to be really, really good at business communications, do business communications. We’re at the size where if we are to retain our world championship status, we need to work really hard.

How to reach: RingCentral Inc., (888) 528-7464 or www.ringcentral.com

Published in Northern California

John Kanas and the new owners of BankUnited knew that they had a big task ahead of them. They had just spent $45 million of their own funds to buy a bank that was hemorrhaging money and had cost the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. nearly $6 billion in losses.

“For maybe a year or more, the company was fighting all of the rumors about its demise,” says Kanas, the chairman, president and CEO of BankUnited, which employs 1,300 people today. “Its earnings were collapsing. People were guessing as to what was going to happen with the company. The morale of the employees was very low… so you can imagine that emotions were running at fever pitch.”

After a lengthy selection process, the bank bid had been awarded to a group of private equity firms led by Kanas, the former head of North Fork Bancorp and a veteran in the banking industry. The group had made it publicly clear that their intention was not to tear the bank apart, but with a new strategy and the right people, rebuild the failing institution. As they entered the bank the day after winning the bid, they were met with a rush of flashbulbs, newspaper reporters and what seemed like a small army of FDIC officials. It was time to get to work.

Communicate the strategy

Kanas and his investor team knew early on that they wanted to transition BankUnited from a wholesale, residential mortgage originator into a commercial bank. When you are undertaking a new strategy, it’s important to quickly let people know where they fit in or don’t fit in to mitigate uncertainty and get started down the new path.

“The first thing we did was immediately seek out those people that we knew we wanted to retain as partners, that we knew could play a very important role in the company in the future under its new structure and assure them that their jobs were safe, that they would in fact be retained and that we would be relying on them to help us in our partnership in the future,” Kanas says.

Months before winning the bid, Kanas’ group had used an extensive due diligence process to gain access to a number of the company’s employees and identify which ones would be helpful in executing their new strategy.

“It was an ongoing process, but we knew the day we walked in who some of those people were,” Kanas says. “So for two or three days, we did nothing but sit down and explain ourselves to those people so that they could buy into our strategy moving forward. I would say the week was largely dedicated to getting people comfortable with who we were and understanding where everyone stood.”

There are also employees who likely aren’t going to be relevant to your strategy. Managing the expectations of these people also needs to be a priority.

“So we very quickly reached out to those people and let them know that there wasn’t going to be a role for them,” Kanas says. “Then we explained to them what our severance policy would be for them, gave them time to adjust their personal lives and made it clear that we intended to move swiftly to do that.”

You need to be very transparent with employees to allay their fears during this initial transition period when tensions are likely to run high.

“It was important to sit down with the people who were left and say, ‘OK, look, this is an unpleasant business — identifying these people and then sort of paring down the ranks,’” Kanas says. “‘We want to do this very quickly but we also want to do it intelligently and not make mistakes. You’re going to have to bear with us for a few weeks.’ And when the process is over … we promised that we would then sit down and let the core of our employees know that we’re done with this. Those of you that have been selected to stay now have a job. Some of you will have a job for one or two years depending on what your function was in the bank and some of you we hope to retain for the rest of your career. We tried to get to those people quickly and let each one of them know where they fit in that spectrum.”

Get buy-in

Kanas knew that Florida would be the perfect home to structure a commercial bank that could gear its success toward products and services for midmarket and small businesses. The next step was convincing people to buy in so they could go out and execute that strategy with enthusiasm.

“So first is get the right people on the bus,” Kanas says. “Second is get those people in a room and overcommunicate with them every day. Make it very, very clear what the strategy is and leave no room for misinterpretation that anyone could misunderstand where we were going, how we intended to get there and what we needed from them as a buy-in or commitment if they wanted a commitment back from the company.”

Kanas and many of the investors had successful backgrounds in business, particularly at North Fork, which had grown from $28 million in assets to one of the largest banks in America under Kanas’ leadership. Pointing to this past success, they diligently spent the first couple of months meeting with the retained employees one-on-one, with small groups or even up to 300 employees at a time, to talk about the new model and why it would work. They were also transparent about the fact that they had literally bought in to the turnaround strategy by committing their own money to buy the company.

“So it was important for our new partners and our new employees in Florida to understand that we were very, very serious about this,” Kanas says. “We’d put our family money into this and we intended to work hard along side of them to help them create the vision.”

To get buy-in for your vision, it also helps to give people goal-connected incentives. Offering stock in your company is one way to achieve that short term and long term. From the beginning, Kanas’ investment group was clear about its hopes to take the bank public but also let people know that whoever helped the company achieve that goal would share in its ownership.

“We did take it public earlier this year and we have about 120 people who are equity partners with me in the company who have major roles in the institution,” he says. “So they are not just employees. They’re owners. To the extent that we will be successful in the future, these people will be able to share in that success directly.”

As you move forward, you can then maintain employee buy-in by communicating your company’s progress on the strategy.

“It’s continuing to let people know that the company’s strength is building every day,” Kanas say. “The earnings stream of BankUnited is very strong so its book value is going up every day. So for those people who own part of it with me, the value of their investment is going up every day… and everybody knows that eventually people recognize the intrinsic value of a company over time. So I think that it’s not hard to keep our people encouraged because they’re so proud of the success that they’ve achieved on a quarter to quarter basis.”

Build your talent pool

In the end, the bank let go about 350 people. So in addition to retaining the key employees, the company needed to find and attract new employees who had the skills to execute its new strategy.

“We were looking for people who had extensive experience in the Florida market, who had existing customer relationships that we could attract to the bank and would help lead us to build a commercial bank,” Kanas says. “We said that we were going to start immediately mining the market for that talent.”

One way to attract talent is to share your vision in a way that communicates it simply and memorably.

“We actually coined in that first couple weeks the term ‘building Florida’s bank,’” Kanas says. “We said, ‘We think we can come here and take the skeleton of this company and build Florida’s bank on it, and you can be part of it.’”

To reach a national talent pool, the company also put out an advertisement in The Wall Street Journal and The Miami Herald.

“It said, ‘If you’re an unhappy Florida banker and you’d like a new home, call us. We’ll change your life,’” Kanas says. “We ran that both on the Internet and newspapers for 10 days and we got 7,000 applicants and 3,000 from New York alone and the rest from Florida.”

As they narrowed down the potential candidates, the company also looked for one, a successful track record and two, the right personality.

“We’ve had great success with hiring people outside of the industry, not bankers, who have come from other industries that require the kind of skills that we think are important in banking today, people who can sell, people who are confident in themselves, people who are engaging and like other people and communicate well,” Kanas says. “So we try to find those people and we find it’s much easier to teach them the technical side of banking than it is to try and change their personality.”

After going through half a room full of resumes, the company was able to hire roughly 250 people to come in and help retool the company.

“We knew that there was a level of frustration among people in Florida who were good bankers stuck in institutions that for one reason or another couldn’t go forward,” Kansas says. “Either they were handcuffed by regulators or handcuffed by inadequate capital positions or some combination of both. We invited them to bring their careers to us and it was overwhelmingly accepted.”

Instead of just trying to fill jobs, Kanas looks to hire people who can complement the company’s strategy, and then works them into it.

“We believe very strongly that the key to the success of any large company is embedded in its human talent,” Kanas says. “So unlike other banks that will go build a branch on the corner of Fifth and Main and then a month before it opens put an ad in the newspaper to try and find somebody to go manage it, we don’t do it that way.”

Instead, the growth strategy is to find the best of the best, get their buy-in and continue to build the company with talented people who can grow the business. For example, the company went ahead and hired a group of people in Orlando before it even had a branch in the market, using those employees to open two branches there more than a year later.

“So we build little energy centers all over the state around successful people who can come to understand our strategy, and we will do that anywhere in Florida,” Kanas says.

He says the key to building a strong company is also not trying to do it on a shoestring.

“We didn’t try to find bargain basement employees,” Kanas says. “We found people who were truly distinguished in their field, and we pulled them out of very good jobs at other banks. I guess that’s another way of saying it’s more expensive than you think it’s going to be. It’s more work than you think it’s going to be. But it’s also a lot more rewarding than you think it’s going to be if you succeed.”

Last January, BankUnited went public in one of the largest bank IPOs in U.S. history. Today it is one of the most capitalized banks in the country, with more than 90 branch locations and $11 billion in assets.

“This is a company that has a clear purpose and a laser-like vision that I believe that our employees understand,” Kanas says. “We’re growing organically at a rate that impresses even me. If you take the second quarter growth in loans and annualize it, we’re growing the commercial component of the bank at over 60 percent a year —and in Florida that’s really saying something. … So I guess the only similarity between the old company and this one is the name.”

How to reach: BankUnited, (877) 779-2265 or www.bankunited.com

Takeaways:

1) Identify new business strategy and which people support it.

2) Get the buy-in of the people who are staying.

3) Build your talent pool to complement the strategy.

The Kanas File

John Kanas

Chairman, president and CEO

BankUnited

Born: South Hampton, New York

Education: Long Island University

How do you retain good people in this environment?

Because we’ve shared our vision with them and continued to share ad nauseum, we keep them excited about where the company’s going. And, of course, they can look over their shoulder at the tremendous success that we’ve had so far and know that they’re part of it. So there is a high level of enthusiasm and excitement in our bank. And frankly in the banking business today, it’s hard to find a place that’s growing and that breeds a level like this of enthusiasm any place else, certainly any place else in Florida if not the whole country.

Kanas’ turnaround takeaways:

  • One of the things is don’t ever underestimate the complexity of the problem and realize that when you’re reshaping a company that’s had a failure, that there are probably a lot of other bad things that you’ll find out six months into it that you didn’t know when you took the first step. So always make the assumption that it’s going to be harder than it looks and be prepared to deal with that.
  • These things are always much more work than you think that they’re going to be. For people who are going to take a challenge like this, it’s important to understand that you cannot do this halfway, that this is a total and complete immersion and it’s a total and complete commitment and you have to be committed with every bone in your body and every molecule in your brain to make it a success…Probably most people haven’t been as successful as they thought they would be because sometimes from the outside, a good management team, and I don’t mean me but the team, can make a job look easy, but it’s not.

Published in Florida

As the economy took a hit over the last few years, Fred Stock saw the demand for his organization’s services grow dramatically. That’s because the result of a down economy is more and more people seeking out more of the services that Jewish Community Services of South Florida has been providing for years. But keeping up with the higher demand has not been easy, especially when coupled with the funding challenges of operating as a not-for-profit entity.

“There’s an increased need corresponding with a reduction of available dollars,” says Stock, the president and CEO of the Miami-based social services agency, which services the Dade County community.

As fundraising in the overall community has dropped, so has the amount of funding dollars coming into the organization.

“So we need to figure out ways to cover the overhead for the agency,” Stock says. “One of the ways is that you reduce those costs by being more efficient.”

Stock says that this is a challenge many more not-for-profit organizations are dealing with today.

One way he says these agencies can manage costs is by providing a mix of free and paid services. By expanding in areas that have a “fee for service,” such as home care, the organization is able to cover costs of the services that it provides for free.

“We’re trying to expand our capabilities to provide services that can reimburse us for our costs, and we can generate some surpluses to pay for the programs that people don’t have the ability to pay for,” Stock says.

However, the crux of the agency’s strategy to become more efficient involves developing partnerships with organizations that share its service goals and funding model.

“We have definitely taken on the belief that in order to be successful, we need to partner,” Stock says.

“By combining, we can serve more people, create operational efficiencies, expand our reach, and it will allow us over the long haul to create more opportunity to serve people.”

While many smaller not-for-profit agencies are quality organizations, they are often limited in what they can do because they don’t have the infrastructure or funding sources to expand and grow. Leading a larger agency, Stock is now working harder to partner with smaller entities so both parties make progress on shared goals. An example is how the agency is partnering with assisted living facilities and HUD 202 housing projects where there are large constituencies of people who need its services.

Stock says you want try to align yourself with agencies and programs that relate to where you can provide services but also with agencies that have a similar mission.

“You maximize their capabilities and their expertise,” Stock says. “You bring that expertise now into this affiliated entity … and then you can expand your service capability because potentially that service can be located in a community that you’re not serving.”

The other advantage of partnering is the potential to combine operations or share resources where appropriate, which can increase efficiencies for both parties. So if two entities are doing billing with a number of grants, there is an opportunity to combine that billing for cost savings.

Stock says constantly monitoring and improving efficiency is something that not-for-profits and businesses should be doing whether or not there are funding issues. By partnering up, the agency continues to find strategic ways to carry out its mission and deliver its services more efficiently.

“We’re a $15 million agency,” Stock says. “We can bring some of that infrastructure — the funding, the marketing, to that new agency and enhance that agency’s effort to create revenue. And then you can create revenue for a larger organization and you have a whole lot more clout, because you have a whole lot more reach. You’re serving more people. In that process, you can find savings within that entity that you can then put back into your programs to yet provide more services.”

Start inside

Many not-for-profit entities have faced funding challenges as a result of the economic recession. Jewish Community Services of South Florida, which provides its services at no cost, is funded primarily through grants and fundraising. But that funding is limited and most of the agency’s funding sources do not provide enough money for its administrative component. To maintain services as money becomes scarcer, president and CEO Fred Stock has led a number of initiatives to be more efficient in this area.

“We’ve had to become much more efficient in the way we provide services and in the way we fund our administrative component,” Stock says. “In an agency, you have direct services and then you have the infrastructure that you need in order to run these services, things like billing, rent, offices and all of that, which are fixed expenses to some degree.”

To increase efficiency in the administrative component, the agency has consolidated some of its offices and begun looking at ways to utilize space better. It’s also started to streamline processes in internal operations such as billing, maintenance and systems.

“We’ve been able to save a substantial amount of money in these areas that has allowed us to continue to provide services at the same rate,” Stock says. “So even through we’ve suffered from reductions in funding, we’ve been able to still maintain the levels of service that we’ve provided over the last few years.”

How to reach: Jewish Community Services of South Florida, (305) 576-6550 or www.jcsfl.org

Published in Florida

In the late ’90s, Jim Griffith found himself among a group of young executives being groomed to lead a $2.6 billion company. With five senior-level employees at The Timken Co. — including the CEO at the time ? preparing for retirement, the succession process was in full swing. But what seemed like a great opportunity was soon lost on Griffith and his peers as the process progressed. They became increasingly aware of one alarming red flag.

“The bottom line was that the company technologically was the best in the world,” says Griffith, who is the president and CEO of Timken today. “Our products from a quality and reputation were the best in the world, and we couldn’t make any money. Our people from external validation were the best in the world, and we couldn’t make any money.”

As a result, the next generation of leaders found themselves harboring some serious doubts about Timken’s future as a profitable company.

“That’s a really troubling thing when you’re saying, ‘OK, I might have the chance to lead a Fortune 500 company and I’m not sure I want to, because it’s not making any money,’” Griffith says.

When he became president of Timken in 1999 — he was promoted to CEO in 2002 — Griffith and his top leaders embarked on what became and intense transformation to reorganize the company around its customers. Here’s how they took a 100-year-old company and reinvented it to make it profitable.

Define your value

One of the first things Griffith and his team recognized was that the company was organized around its products, a strategy that went back to its roots.

“What we concluded was that the company that was founded by Henry Timken in 1899 to manufacture his invention called the tapered roller bearing — effectively it’s a wheel bearing in a car — over the 20th century had become so product focused that we’d forgotten that the reason for being in business is to create value for customers,” Griffith says. “And when we then stepped back and said, ‘Where are the places that we create value for customers?’ they were very different than where the product-focused strategy drove us.”

One of the first moves the company’s leadership made was to restructure Timken around its markets instead of its products. Instead of having a bearing business and steel business, there was an auto business, an aerospace business, an industrial business and a precision steel components business, and the presidents were asked to focus on creating value for customers rather than maximizing sales.

“That led us down a learning journey of where does Timken really create value,” Griffith says.

The company went through a process of looking at each of its markets and asking, “How do we make money in this market?” and “What’s the value proposition?”

“Again, it was a real learning journey, because in some cases, what we found was we had to change the way we operated to be profitable,” Griffith says.

He and his team also utilized a rigorous marketing analysis to evaluate Timken’s relative profitability and relative differentiation in its current markets. One thing that they discovered was that while the company made great products, its products were valued much more in some markets than others.

“We make steel or we make bearings or we make gears,” Griffith says. “We make your car not break down. We make airliners land safely. We make jet engines more efficient. We make it possible to drill for oil 40,000 feet under the ground. That’s what we do. And there are some of those places where we were selling our products that you didn’t care. You don’t really care if you have a Timken bearing in your car, because the difference between Timken and our competitors is that if you have a Timken bearing, your car will last for a million miles. Now how many cars have you had that last a million miles? So we had competitors that were designing lower performance products, cheaper products, and putting them in those applications. And you’re happy with that.”

Early on, Griffith says the company had made far too many decisions about markets based on gut feel instead of analytics. But strategic marketing tools can be extremely valuable in helping you make decisions to guide the direction of your business.

“We learned a tremendous amount by going out and finding the best analytic tools for driving our marketing process,” he says. “When we finally did that, it made some tough decisions, like what to do with the auto industry, amazingly easy. I wish we had done that five years earlier.”

Differentiate yourself

For Griffith, there were a couple of significant takeaways from the marketing analysis. First, Timken was at its heart a technology company. So to create value for its customers, the company needed to find the right technical problems to solve for them.

“When you are on an airplane, and you’re coming in for a landing and that tire hits the tarmac and it goes from zero to 160 mph in a split second, you don’t want anything but the best,” Griffith says. “So the difference is that we have maybe 15 percent penetration in the auto industry and we have effectively 100 percent penetration in landing wheels. And that learning about where are the places that Timken can create value was fundamental in most of the first half of the last decade.”

The challenge was finding ways to take the company’s core technical capability to market in a way that nobody else could and that customers would buy into — in other words, leveraging that differentiator to enhance existing products and services and expand into channels and markets where it can be competitive.

“In worlds of technology, we are the best in the world,” Griffith says. “Learning to translate that into business models and products that create customer value that’s differentiated was a critical learning for us.”

Part of that involved moving into markets or investing in areas where it could differentiate itself from competitors, such as aftermarket (replacement part) opportunities.

“The bearings in a car — one in 10 gets replaced over the life of a car,” Griffith says. “The bearings in a steel rolling mill get replaced every year. We spend a lot more time designing new products for rolling mills because there’s an opportunity for our technology to make them last longer in a way that is more valuable to the customer. They’ll pay for it and there is an opportunity to help that customer with replacement products.”

By investing in its industrial aftermarket segment, the company has grown that segment to $1 billion in sales.

“So our most profitable segment, we’ve grown five times and half of them are products that weren’t in our portfolio in 2000,” Griffith says.

The other piece is to exit markets in which you just can’t compete and be profitable.

Even though Timken was historically an automotive company, it could not get its auto market to make money on an ongoing basis. So in 2007, the company made a radical shift under Griffith’s leadership to transition out of the market. When demand for the auto market dropped in 2009, it also sold a large piece of its auto business to a Japanese company and made large cuts in auto support services.

“That put some cash in the bank for us and changed our profile,” Griffith says.

From a markets standpoint, the overall change in portfolio has been dramatic. Today, it includes markets such as mining, heavy transportation rail, heavy truck, the agricultural market and the international market.

“We went through that in every business that we have,” Griffith says. “The net result was we closed probably 30 locations around the world that couldn’t be competitive or needed to be more efficient or needed to be more effective. We built a half a dozen new locations in new markets where we were growing. So net we didn’t change the number of people but changed the structure of the way we operate. We radically changed our portfolio and radically changed our market portfolio.”

Again, the key to growth is not just investing in markets where you have the best product, but where you can deliver value in unique ways.

“Most of the products you’re going to see are things we made 10 year ago,” Griffith says. “But the way we take it to market, the mix in the portfolio and the way that we engage with customers to create value is so radically different, you might as well say it’s a new company.”

Prioritize performance

A critical driver of this transformation has been the company’s dedication to being a high-performance organization. This focus has helped it navigate numerous challenges as it implemented some major changes to reinvent the company, such as when the company’s leadership realized that Timken’s big manufacturing plants in the United Kingdom and Columbus, Ohio, couldn’t compete and needed to be shut down.

“The key to it was strategically, we were very clear where the company was going and so we knew what were the areas that had to be sustained were and what were the areas where we were going to reduce our presence,” Griffith says. “When you think about it in those terms, you take deeper cuts in the areas that you are exiting and lesser cuts in the areas that are crucial.”

Another critical time was in 2009 when demand for the company’s products dropped and its sales fell 38 percent. To improve efficiencies, the company had launched a business redesign process called Project ONE a few years earlier, which put in place an SAP enterprise management system and helped it take $400 million out of inventory in 2009. But at the same time, it still had to cut costs in any way it could, including 6,000 jobs globally.

“The concept of walking into plants that have been part of your family for a long time and saying goodbye to people is a very personal thing,” Griffith says. “The way it works at Timken — you hate to say that you become good at that — but we’ve become very good at that. We’re very open, and people understand the performance that’s going on.”

When cutting costs, Griffith says you start with strategic cuts — areas where you know you are going to lose business — and then use your performance management systems to put boxes around your stars and take deeper cuts in areas where you have low-performing people. You approach these decisions as a family, communicate openly about what’s going on, and then people will understand that as a high-performance company you need to set aggressive targets.

“It’s all about people, and having really good leaders in place is crucial, even more crucial when you’re going through a period of crisis,” Griffith says. “There’s a natural tendency, particularly in a family kind of culture, to try to support and sustain people who aren’t the absolute top people. There’s always a tendency to hang on to people too long. That’s good and bad. But from a performance point of view, that’s critical from this point.”

By transitioning into markets where it adds the most customer value and building business models that allow it to be profitable in those markets, the company has emerged a decade later outperforming its highest expectations, growing revenue 29 percent to $4.1 billion in 2010. In 2000, Timken generated roughly 50 percent of its revenues from bearings and steel in the automotive industry. Today that number is about 15 percent.

“It’s 112 years old, but it’s a new company,” Griffith says.

“We’ve retained our best people. We have shifted the portfolio of the company to much more attractive markets, markets with better aftermarket, better growth practices, more focused on the parts of the world that are growing. We have better management tools — this Project ONE capability. So better people, better markets, better management processes and then you are surprised that we’re getting record results.”

How to reach: The Timken Co., www.timken.com or (330) 438-3000

The Griffith File

Jim Griffith

President and CEO

The Timken Co.

Born: Palmerton, Pa.

Education: B.S. in industrial engineering and MBA, Stanford University

What is one part of your daily routine that you wouldn’t change?

I am an early bird — up at 5:00 a.m. or before every morning. I savor the quiet time before the family gets up — I usually walk the dog or exercise. It gives me an opportunity to think through the day ahead and be prepared to tackle whatever challenges it brings. I have done this since I was around 10 years old and continue to get up early, seven days a week.

What is your favorite part of your job?

Interacting with the people of Timken. I get to travel a great deal and interact with people all over the world. The people of Timken never cease to amaze me. Give them a challenge, hand them a tough assignment, and it never ceases to amaze me the creativity, resilience and character of the people who make up our company. My wife loves it when I come back from our plants because I always have a smile on my face, impressed with what I see. The most outstanding examples come in the most trying times — for example, in the recession of 2009, one plant in South Carolina needed to cut half of its workforce. Instead, the people decided that they should share the pain and chose to work alternate weeks, an impressive sacrifice by the most senior people. I could tell a hundred stories like this.

What’s the best piece of business advice you’ve received?

I’m a believer in people. I believe in people. I’m a natural delegator. And if you’re a natural delegator then you’ve better surround yourself with the best people that you can find, people whose judgment you trust, and set the parameters, set the objectives back to being aligned on the strategy. This is where I get real sensitive about, ‘Look what Jim Griffith’s done at Timken, because it isn’t what Jim Griffith’s done at Timken. …The sum of the decisions and capabilities of that leadership team is massively larger than the influence I could have. My influence is to get them aligned in terms of what that vision and objective is. Then frankly it’s stay out the way so that I don’t mess up the decisions that they make.

What is the culture like at Timken?

The answer is it is a family culture. For those of us that have been around a long time it’s kind of an emanation of the fact that the Timken family started it. But that’s not what makes us a family culture. What makes us a family culture is we tend to be people who come here, stay a long time, get to know each other, know each other and their families, work together on things outside. So we really are a very close-knit culture. Even people who come from outside become family.

Takeaways

1) Figure out where you create value.

2) Structure portfolio for value creation.

3) Optimize your performance.

Published in Akron/Canton