SBN Staff

Saturday, 23 November 2013 01:35

Eaton Corp. embraces its Northeast Ohio roots

PILLAR AWARD FOR COMMUNITY SERVICE

Alexander Cutler
Chairman and CEO
Eaton Corp.
www.eaton.com

Eaton Corp. takes a different approach to corporate giving than many companies — they let employees determine where the company donates a large share of its contributions, based on the needs in the communities and interests of local employees. These donations go to hundreds of community organizations every year.

Eaton’s yearly contributions are based on a rolling average of its annual profits, so as the company grows, so do its contributions to the communities in which Eaton employees live and work. In 2012, that total exceeded $8.7 million.

There is no better example of this than in the Cleveland area, where Eaton has been located for 100 years. Founder Joseph Eaton was one of the local leaders who helped create the Community Chest, a precursor to the United Way. Eaton’s culture of giving back continues with Alexander Cutler, the company’s chairman and CEO.

Eaton has about 1,800 employees at eight Cleveland-area locations serving its global customers in the electrical, aerospace, hydraulics and vehicle businesses. In Ohio, Eaton has about 3,500 employees. The company’s employee-driven model means that Eaton works with a wide range of organizations in addressing a broad spectrum of needs in local communities, from education to arts and culture, to health and human services.

Eaton is represented on more than 90 boards in the Cleveland area, holding leadership positions with ideastream, University Hospitals Health System, the Salvation Army of Greater Cleveland, the Greater Cleveland Partnership, the United Way of Greater Cleveland, the Musical Arts Association, the Playhouse Square Foundation and the Cleveland Museum of Art. ●

PILLAR AWARD FOR COMMUNITY SERVICE

Kevin J. Goodman
Managing director and partner
BlueBridge Networks LLS
www.bluebridgenetworks.com 

BlueBridge Networks LLC, a data protections and recovery organization, is familiar with partnering with small to middle market businesses — and that also goes for giving back to its partner community enterprises.

This summer, BlueBridge announced plans for a hometown project with global implications. BlueBridge has donated up to $600,000 to help move the Cleveland Museum of Art collection to a cloud-based archival repository to provide a redundancy and preservation system more efficiently than the museum could do in-house.

As a result, not only will the staff be able to retrieve specific digital materials more efficiently, but the project will eliminate the need for more than 1,000 gold DVDs a year, currently used for data storage.

Kevin Goodman, managing director and partner, says BlueBridge’s involvement in the project is just a portion of his long-standing respect for Cleveland and its institutions.

Such projects are not the only focus of BlueBridge’s philanthropic efforts. The company supports the American Red Cross of Greater Cleveland, helping to organize blood drives.

BlueBridge has also joined with the Greater Cleveland Partnership, the largest private-sector economic development organization in Ohio, to assist the agency in its efforts to help create jobs and help businesses grow in Northeast Ohio.

Goodman believes companies choose BlueBridge as a service provider more and more because of its growth and maturity as an organization — a direct result of serving the community. ●

Medical Mutual, along with our co-founding Pillar Award partner Smart Business, presents the 16th annual Pillar Awards.

This year, we are honoring an outstanding group of companies and organizations of varying sizes.

While this year’s diverse group of honorees may be different in many ways, one thing that they all have in common is their commitment to strengthening the bond between the for-profit and nonprofit worlds.

It occurred to us many years ago that few things are more meaningful and important than investing time and resources in supporting our community, and we felt the need to honor companies and their employees who have gone above and beyond the call. While support and direction come from management, companies are only as great as their employees.

For that reason, we are proud to present the Medical Mutual SHARE Award. This unique award was founded to recognize companies whose employees best exemplify the ideals of Medical Mutual’s own employee SHARE Committee. SHARE stands for serve, help, aid, reach and educate, and is the heart and soul of Medical Mutual’s charitable giving efforts.

The SHARE committee, comprised of Medical Mutual employee volunteers, helps coordinate more than two-dozen community events involving nearly half of the company’s 2,500 employees.

On behalf of Medical Mutual and Smart Business, we congratulate all our 2013 Pillar Award recipients.

Rick Chiricosta
Chairman, president and CEO
Medical Mutual
www.medmutual.com

CATEGORIES:

  • Pillar Award for Community Service - Presented to for-profit businesses for their community service efforts
  • Medical Mutual SHARE Award - Presented to one company annually that best exemplifies employee-driven community service, philanthropy or volunteerism.
  • Nonprofit Board Executive of the Year Award - Honors contributions by for-profit business executives who serve as members of nonprofit boards
  • Nonprofit Executive Director of the Year Award - Recognizes nonprofit executive directors who effectively apply for-profit business principles to their organizations.
  • Fairmount Minerals Sustainable Business Award - Awarded to the organization that best demonstrates sustainable business practices.
  • Kent Clapp CEO Leadership Award - Recognizes the top executive of a for-profit company for creating a culture of giving.
  • Clark-Reliance Youth Philanthropy Award – Presented to the individual or individuals under the age of 22 or who have not yet graduated from college, who best demonstrate the spirit and drive to organize a nonprofit, create an individual initiative that impacts others, or develop a program designed to give back to the community either on an ongoing basis or as a one-off effort.

HONOREES:

Kent Clapp CEO Leadership Award, Kevin Goodman, managing director, Blue Bridge Networks

Pillar Award for Community Service

Medical Mutual SHARE Award 

Fairmount Minerals Sustainable Business Practices Award 

Executive Directors of the Year

Nonprofit Board Executives of the Year

Clark-Reliance Youth Philanthropy Award

Wednesday, 20 November 2013 07:15

The 2013 Class of Power Players in Columbus

Smart Business Columbus would like to recognize
The 2013 Class of Power Players in Columbus.

This year long luncheon series featured the most influential business leaders in the region sharing their perspective on why Columbus is such a great place to live, work and visit.

Meet this year's Power Players!

 

Janet E. Jackson

president and CEO
United Way of Central Ohio

Janet E. Jackson is president and CEO of United Way of Central Ohio, one of the largest United Way organizations in the country. Under her leadership, United Way is mobilizing the central Ohio community to accomplish concrete goals, addressing the root causes of issues facing the community in order to create lasting change.

Jackson also serves as vice chair of the Central Ohio Workforce Investment Board, and as vice chair of Learn4Life. She is a board member of The Center for Family Safety and Healing, and served on the City of Columbus 2012 Bicentennial Planning Commission.

Her work earned her an induction into the Ohio Women’s Hall of Fame in 2001, and this year Jackson was named the “2013 Professional Woman of the Year” by The Women of Color Foundation. 

 

Michelle Heritage

executive director
Community Shelter Board

Michelle Heritage has served as the executive director of the Community Shelter Board since April 2010, providing leadership to the nonprofit by achieving community-wide objectives focused on ending homelessness.

She is responsible for strategic planning and collaborative efforts, private-sector fundraising and resource development, effective government systems and private-sector relationships. Heritage has extensive nonprofit and public sector experience, including more than 20 years in leadership roles in the homeless system, mental health, child welfare and the alcohol and drug system.

She serves on national, statewide and local boards and committees for human services, diversity, homelessness and community research. In 2010, WELD calendar featured Heritage as one of the “12 Women You Should Know.” The Better Business Bureau, United Way and Mid-Ohio Foodbank have recognized the Community Shelter Board for its accomplishments under Heritage’s leadership. 

 

Sheri Tackett

founder and CEO
Delta Energy

As the organization’s founder and CEO, Sheri Tackett is responsible for the strategic direction and overall business management of Delta Energy and its related companies. Prior to forming Delta, Tackett held senior management positions within Ashland Inc.’s chemical and energy exploration divisions.

With 27 years of experience in the energy industry, Tackett was recently named to the 2012 class of “Enterprising Women of the Year” by Enterprising Women Magazine. She is a member of the National Association of Women Business Owners, the Women’s President’s Organization and the United Way Women’s Leadership Council.

She is an advisory board member for Women for Economic and Leadership Development; a board member for Make-A-Wish Foundation and the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society; and chair for the Tiffany Circle Society of Women Leaders of the American Red Cross. 

 

Jack Partridge

president
Columbia Gas of Ohio

Jack Partridge has been president of Columbia Gas of Ohio since 2003. In 2011, he assumed the role of chief regulatory officer of Columbia Gas of Ohio, a subsidiary of the NiSource Gas Distribution Companies. Partridge began his career with Columbia Gas in 1977 as a government affairs representative at the company’s local distribution company in Pennsylvania. Partridge served as a member of the Ohio Governor’s Workforce Policy Board and as chairman of the Goodwill Columbus board of directors. He and his wife, Anne, are co-chairs for the United Way of Central Ohio’s 2013 fundraising campaign. 

 

Dr. Steven Gabbe

senior VP for health sciences/CEO
The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Dr. Steven Gabbe arrived as plans for the largest physical expansion project in the history of The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center were being developed. The $1 billion expansion project is expected to be finished in 2016. Gabbe is the author of more than 160 peer-reviewed papers and is senior editor of the leading textbook in his field, “Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies.” He has held leadership positions with the Association of American Medical Colleges and National Institutes of Health. Gabbe is co-chair of the Liaison Committee for Medical Education and is a member of the Institute of Medicine. 

 

Jordan A. Miller

president and CEO, Central Ohio
Fifth Third Bank

Jordan A. Miller began his career at Fifth Third Bank in 1998. He was serving as senior vice president and manager of Fifth Third Investment Advisors for the bank’s Cincinnati affiliate when he was chosen to head up Central Ohio operations. Before joining Fifth Third Bank, Miller was chief financial officer and business manager for Huntington Investment Co. in Columbus. He is a past member of the Bank Broker Dealer Committee for the National Association of Securities Dealers in Washington, D.C. In 2011, Miller was honored as a member of the Bank Insurance & Securities Association Circle of Excellence. 

 

Kelly Borth

CEO and chief strategy officer,
GREENCREST

Kelly Borth co-founded GREENCREST, a brand development, strategic and interactive marketing and public relations firm, in 1990 and has received numerous honors for her business and community leadership. GREENCREST specializes in unique communications programs that begin with a solid marketing foundation and result in increased market penetration and awareness. Borth’s background includes experience as a marketing specialist, marketing director and public relations director. She is a sought-after business adviser and serves on numerous community and business advisory boards. Borth has received accolades ranging from one of Columbus’s top “Forty Under 40” to the EY Entrepreneur Of The Year, Supporter of Entrepreneurship Award finalist. 

 

Chuck Gehring

president and CEO
LifeCare Alliance

LifeCare Alliance, launched in 1898, administers health and nutrition services to older adults and chronically ill or homebound residents of Central Ohio through programs ranging from Meals on Wheels to Visiting Nurses. Chuck Gehring serves as president and CEO of the organization. Gehring’s background includes an impressive list of service in both the private and not-for-profit sectors. A member and board member of numerous not-for-profit organizations, he was executive vice president and COO for Catholic Social Services before joining LifeCare Alliance, and has worked for Sanese Services and Anheuser Busch. Gehring is also an adjunct professor at Franklin University in the Master of Business Administration program. 

 

Kenny McDonald

chief economic officer
Columbus 2020

As chief economic officer of Columbus 2020, Kenny McDonald, CEcD, oversees the economic development and business attraction efforts for the 11-county Columbus Region. McDonald’s extensive experience helps guide Columbus 2020 to be instrumental in forming private/public partnerships that help develop the company’s growth and innovation plans. He also serves as an elected member of the board of directors for the International Economic Development Council, and serves on the boards of NAIOP, SciTech and the Columbus Crew. McDonald’s previous experience includes executive vice president of the Charlotte Regional Partnership and leadership positions at the Albuquerque Economic Development Corp., Fluor Daniels Global Locations Strategies and the Savannah Economic Development Authority. 

 

Wednesday, 30 October 2013 00:55

Sustainable ways of working

The Summit of Sustainability Awards

Winner Large Business Category
GOJO Industries Inc. 

GOJO Industries Inc. was built upon a legacy of sustainability — there had to be a better, safer and gentler way for Akron’s rubber workers during World War II to clean their hands. The harsh benzene chemical used at the time was unhealthy. The result was the launch of GOJO, a cleaner which cut through tough soils but washed off in water.

Ever since then, the company has focused on innovative and sustainable products such as Purell hand sanitizer.

“The progress in our social, environmental and economic sustainability measurements is a direct result of the authentic commitment of GOJO employees to our Sustainable Ways of Working culture,” said GOJO Vice Chair Marcella Kanfer Rolnick.

In 2012, the company’s success in reducing environmental impacts earned GOJO the prestigious Environmental Excellence Award from the Ohio EPA.

The company set a goal in 2010 to reduce water use by 30 percent — and by the end of 2012 had already reduced consumption by 29 percent. The company found ways through equipment upgrades and new technologies, processes and procedures, to cut more than 1.5 million gallons annually.

Likewise, the company set a goal to reduce solid waste. A total of 84 percent of the waste generated in 2012 was diverted from landfills. Instead, it was recycled or repurposed through several programs with third parties such as in association with Matthew 25: Ministries, a collaboration which not only helps reduce the waste stream but helps bring well-being to people in need.

Greenhouse gas reduction as well has exceeded expectations. There has been a 40 percent reduction in the past three years, while 5 percent had been the goal.

 

 

Are you “results-oriented?” Do you have a “proven track record?” Would you consider yourself a “problem solver?” According to LinkedIn, these are some of the most overused buzzwords on profiles across the popular professional social network.

A problem in today’s saturated marketplace is finding your unique place as a professional. Whether you are a self-employed entrepreneur or an executive at a large corporation, you are in charge of your own career. A successful brand relies on its unique positioning in the marketplace. Likewise, a successful businessperson must understand the importance of crafting a personal brand. Your unique identity sets you apart from the competition and contributes to the overall success of your company, says Jenna Drenten, Ph.D., assistant professor of marketing, Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics, Boler School of Business, John Carroll University.

“We choose one product over another because it offers something special. The same is true for today’s professionals,” says Drenten. “In today’s competitive marketplace, business professionals must perfect the art of what I call personal branding — developing a unique personal brand and actively promoting that brand to others.  Personal branding is not only beneficial for your own career, it also benefits your company’s brand image.” 

Smart Business spoke with Drenten about the importance of branding yourself and key strategies for managing a successful personal brand.

What does it mean to brand yourself?

Branding yourself means to develop a unique professional identity and coherent message that sets you apart from others either in your company or in your industry. If you are a CEO or an entrepreneur, you may say, ‘I have enough on my plate by building and managing my company’s brand, much less my own.’ But branding yourself is just as important, if not more so. Think of business leaders like Steve Jobs and Oprah Winfrey. Their personal brand images are synonymous with their companies.  Regardless of your career status, you must commit to being the brand manager of your own personal brand.

What is your unique selling proposition?

In branding yourself, the goal is to differentiation from others but consistently within your message. What specific characteristics and field-related expertise do you have that others may not? Try to develop a personal positioning statement. It should be a concise, one- to two-sentence statement that reflects your unique value as a business professional. Consider creating a short tagline for yourself that captures who you are and what sets you apart.

What is your personal brand management strategy?

Once you have pinpointed your unique brand, you need to communicate it to others.  Your goal is to actively promote and manage your personal brand. Branding yourself involves creating a unified message across all outlets. Consistency is crucial, especially in today’s digital age. If someone were to search your name on the Web today, what would they find? Take control of your online brand image by creating a personal website outlining your achievements or by starting a blog that allows you to share your distinct industry-related ideas. Your personal brand management strategy should be proactive and should reflect your natural capabilities. For instance, if you excel at face-to-face communication, attend networking events and schedule coffee meetings. 

How does branding yourself benefit your company?

In marketing, a phenomenon called the ‘halo effect’ suggests consumers make more favorable judgments of a particular product because of positive biases toward associated brands or people. For instance, consumers are biased toward brands endorsed by their favorite celebrities. The same is true for personal branding. If you develop a unique personal brand, your company gets included in the positive halo of your success. The connections that you make and the network that you develop can be transferred to your company.

How does branding yourself benefit your career?

You are the product and your employer is the customer. Branding yourself allows you to market your skills to meet the customer’s needs. Regardless of the stage at which you are in your career, it is important to stay marketable by creating a unique brand for yourself, separate from your identity within your company. This gives you more opportunities for mobility both within and outside of your organization. As your personal brand awareness increases, you may be invited to speak at industry events, contribute to industry related stories, and so on not because of your status within a company, but because of your branded expertise within the wider industry.

Jenna Drenten, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of Marketing in the Department of Management, Marketing, and Logistics in the Boler School of Business at John Carroll University. Reach her at jdrenten@jcu.edu.

Many small business owners only have a certain budget for insurance, so a strong relationship with an insurance agent who takes a proactive approach to mitigating risk and protecting their business is key. The cost of business insurance is not prohibitive, but replacing offices and not being able to work because of a loss can be.

“Remind yourself that having good coverage is one of the costs of doing business and part of your responsibility to yourself, your business and others who depend on you,” says Tim Able, a client advisor at SeibertKeck Insurance Agency.

Smart Business spoke with Able about what small business owners need to understand about their insurance coverage and risks.

What are the most important insurance coverages for small businesses?

Every business, even if it’s home-based, needs to have liability insurance. This provides both defense and damages if you, your employees, your products or services cause or are alleged to have caused bodily injury or property damage to a third party.

If you own your building or have content, known as business personal property, including office equipment, computers, inventory or tools, you will need property insurance that will protect you if you have a fire, vandalism, theft, smoke damage, etc.

It is also important to include business interruption/loss of earnings insurance as part of the policy in order to protect your earnings in the event the business is unable to operate.

Lastly, with commercial auto insurance, you can insure your work vehicles from damage and collisions. If you do not have company vehicles, but employees drive their own cars on company business, you should have hired and non-owned auto liability to protect the company in case the employee does not have insurance or has inadequate coverage.

The top 10 insurance coverages are:

  • General liability insurance.
  • Property insurance.
  • Commercial auto insurance.
  • Workers’ compensation.
  • Professional liability.
  • Employment practices liability.
  • Directors and officers insurance.
  • Privacy and security coverage, also known as cyber liability.
  • Personal home and auto policy.
  • Umbrella coverage.


Where do some business owners fall short on essential protection?

A business may fall short in identifying risks when its risk management measures are reactive and not proactive. It’s important that a business aligns itself with an insurance agent who takes a proactive approach to mitigating your risk. Meeting with your agent on a quarterly or semi-annual basis will help to identify exposures that could potentially cost a business everything.

In addition, a proactive approach to minimizing risks in the workplace may help to lower your insurance premiums by preventing future claims.

How much does the size and type of business impact what insurance is necessary?

Risks increase substantially as a business grows, as more employees are hired and as more services are rendered or products sold. While a crossbow manufacturer will certainly have different needs and risks than a website designer, having the right protection is equally important.

Creating a new revenue channel, opening a new location or making any significant change to how your business normally runs should be reviewed with your insurance agent. Major changes like these can lead to gaps in your insurance coverage, leaving a business exposed.

Business owners put a lot of time and energy into growing their business and providing for employees and their families. That’s why it is so important they make sure their business is properly protected.

Tim Able is a client advisor at SeibertKeck Insurance Agency. Reach him at (330) 294-1363 or table@seibertkeck.com.

Insights Business Insurance is brought to you by SeibertKeck

Many small business owners only have a certain budget for insurance, so a strong relationship with an insurance agent who takes a proactive approach to mitigating risk and protecting their business is key. The cost of business insurance is not prohibitive, but replacing offices and not being able to work because of a loss can be.

“Remind yourself that having good coverage is one of the costs of doing business and part of your responsibility to yourself, your business and others who depend on you,” says Marc McTeague, president of Best Hoovler McTeague Insurance Services Inc., a SeibertKeck company.

Smart Business spoke with McTeague about what small business owners need to understand about their insurance coverage and risks.

What are the most important insurance coverages for small businesses?

Every business, even if it’s home-based, needs to have liability insurance. This provides both defense and damages if you, your employees, your products or services cause or are alleged to have caused bodily injury or property damage to a third party.

If you own your building or have content, known as business personal property, including office equipment, computers, inventory or tools, you will need property insurance that will protect you if you have a fire, vandalism, theft, smoke damage, etc.

It is also important to include business interruption/loss of earnings insurance as part of the policy in order to protect your earnings in the event the business is unable to operate.

Lastly, with commercial auto insurance, you can insure your work vehicles from damage and collisions. If you do not have company vehicles, but employees drive their own cars on company business, you should have hired and non-owned auto liability to protect the company in case the employee does not have insurance or has inadequate coverage.

The top 10 insurance coverages are:

  • General liability insurance.
  • Property insurance.
  • Commercial auto insurance.
  • Workers’ compensation.
  • Professional liability.
  • Employment practices liability.
  • Directors and officers insurance.
  • Privacy and security coverage, also known as cyber liability.
  • Personal home and auto policy.
  • Umbrella coverage.


Where do some business owners fall short on essential protection?

A business may fall short in identifying risks when its risk management measures are reactive and not proactive. It’s important that a business aligns itself with an insurance agent who takes a proactive approach to mitigating your risk. Meeting with your agent on a quarterly or semi-annual basis will help to identify exposures that could potentially cost a business everything.

In addition, a proactive approach to minimizing risks in the workplace may help to lower your insurance premiums by preventing future claims.

How much does the size and type of business impact what insurance is necessary?

Risks increase substantially as a business grows, as more employees are hired and as more services are rendered or products sold. While a crossbow manufacturer will certainly have different needs and risks than a website designer, having the right protection is equally important.

Creating a new revenue channel, opening a new location or making any significant change to how your business normally runs should be reviewed with your insurance agent. Major changes like these can lead to gaps in your insurance coverage, leaving a business exposed.

Business owners put a lot of time and energy into growing their business and providing for employees and their families, it is important they make sure it is properly protected.

Marc McTeague is President of Best Hoovler McTeague Insurance Services Inc., a SeibertKeck company. Reach him at (614) 246-RISK (7475) or mmcteague@bhmins.com.

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Statistics from the National Council on Compensation Insurance show that 38 to 50 percent of all workers’ compensation claims are related to the use of alcohol or drugs in the workplace. According to the U.S. Small Business Association, on average, employees with inappropriate substance use cost their employers $7,000 annually. Many Ohio businesses are turning to the Bureau of Workers’ Compensation’s (BWC) Drug Free Safety Program (DFSP) for assistance to address this issue and reduce their annual premium.

“A well-designed DFSP will help an employer deter substance use on the job, create a safer workplace and impact the bottom line by providing a discount to the employer’s premium,” says Cassy Taylor, senior risk services analyst at CompManagement, Inc.

Smart Business spoke with Taylor about the main components of Ohio’s DFSP.

What discount levels are available and when are enrollment deadlines?

DFSP offers basic and advanced discount levels that provide a 4 and 7 percent discount, respectively. Public employers wishing to participate may start their program Jan. 1 of each year. However, private employers have the opportunity to begin on either Jan. 1 or July 1. Applications for programs beginning Jan. 1 are due to the BWC by the last business day of October while those starting July 1 must submit their applications by the last business day of April.

What components does a DFSP require?

Basic and advanced levels of DFSP require:

  • Annual reporting.
  • Annual online safety assessment.
  • Accident analysis training for supervisors.
  • Use of online accident analysis on the BWC website for each accident/claim.
  • A written policy in place.
  • A minimum of one hour annual employee training.
  • A minimum of two hours first year and one hour refresher supervisor training.
  • Pre-employment, post-accident, reasonable suspicion and return to duty follow-up drug/alcohol testing.
  • A cut off level of .04 blood alcohol content.
  • Zero tolerance (basic level only).
  • List of referrals for employee assistance.

In addition, the advanced level program also requires 15 percent random drug and alcohol testing, a second chance agreement for employees, a substance assessment for employee assistance and an annual safety action plan.

How does Ohio’s rebuttable presumption law factor in?  

The rebuttable presumption law puts the burden on employees to prove that alcohol or drugs found in their system were not the proximate cause of a workplace injury. It also allows employers to ask for a disallowance of a workers’ compensation claim for an employee who tests positive on a qualifying chemical test. The law also is applied if an injured employee refuses a test. For a workers’ compensation claim to be allowed the injured employee must prove that being intoxicated by alcohol or under the influence of any controlled substance not prescribed by the employee’s physician was not a factor in the accident that caused the injury. Employers must post a written notice provided by the BWC to alert employees that they may not be eligible for workers’ compensation benefits if they are injured while intoxicated or under the influence of a controlled substance.   

What impact would the DFSP have on a midsize company’s premium?

Assuming the eligibility and program participation requirements are met, a midsize service company could expect the following in annual premium savings by implementing the advanced level program, assuming the employer is participating in no other alternative rating programs:

  • Payroll — $3,990,000.    
  • Individual discount — 16 percent.
  • Individual premium — $14,683.
  • 7 percent advanced level DFSP discount — $700*.

*Based on pure premium, which does not include assessments for DWRF and administrative costs for operation of BWC/IC.

Savings reflected above do not include the additional savings that can be realized by also participating in programs compatible with DFSP such as Group Rating, Destination Excellence, Small Deductible, and Safety Council to name a few. Always have your third-party administrator conduct a feasibility study to evaluate the best savings options available for your organization.

Cassy Taylor is senior risk services analyst at CompManagement, Inc. Reach her at (800) 825-6755, ext. 65434 or cassy.taylor@sedgwick.com.

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