How succession planning provides for your business’s and family’s future Featured

8:16pm EDT February 28, 2013
Carly Fagan Neals, J.D., Senior Trust Officer, Vice President, First Commonwealth Advisors Carly Fagan Neals, J.D., Senior Trust Officer, Vice President, First Commonwealth Advisors

Estate planning is important for everyone. But in the case of a business owner, not giving serious consideration to what could happen to your business could potentially shut it down entirely, thereby eliminating your family’s income at a time when it is critical.

“It’s important that business owners understand that their plan only works the way it’s set up to work if the circumstances that originally determined the nature of the plan remain the same,” says Carly Fagan Neals, J.D., senior trust officer and vice president at First Commonwealth Advisors. “So if there are changes in the business structure, goals or family structure, they have to be communicated to the adviser — the accountant, the lawyer, whoever put the plan in place.

“A business owner has to take an active role in making sure the plan still works because only he or she knows the facts as they are today,” she says.

Smart Business spoke with Neals about how a succession plan is thoughtfully created in conjunction with your estate plan and what factors need to be coordinated and reviewed.

Is there a good time to begin planning?

Every individual should have a will, a financial power of attorney and a health care power of attorney/living will. As soon as you have assets or children it’s imperative to plan because otherwise your assets don’t get to where they need to go and your heirs don’t necessarily get cared for the way you’d want. For many, this can occur at an early age.

What’s involved with establishing long-term goals and determining succession risks?

Every person’s long-term goals are different, and they often evolve and change. So continually question how you can accomplish what you need to, such as passing the business on when you retire or providing for your family in the event of your death or incapacitation.

If your long-term goals involve transferring the business to some specific person, constantly re-evaluate whether that person is able and willing. What training and education might be necessary? When do you start transferring the business, and is it in a monetary sense or just voting stock? And if you’re retiring, how and when do you phase yourself out?

What are some strategies for success?

Ensure there’s sufficient insurance on the owner’s life or the necessary liquidity for all situations, and hands-on training and education for whoever is taking over the business. Also, is a spouse with power of attorney making business decisions? Do you want it to work that way? Be aware of the capabilities and willingness of those you name to have this authority.

Estate and succession plans need to work in tandem. For example, company stock may be a very large asset of the estate, but you need to know how that stock will be used to provide the surviving spouse with the necessary cash flow. Does your business successor need a life insurance policy on you to buy the stock so the resulting cash can go into a trust for your spouse?

Regularly work with your advisers to analyze the possible tax consequences of any transfer or proposed transfer. You don’t want to trigger a big gain or loss as a result of a transfer without planning for it.

Finally, a business succession plan needs to take into account the business’s operating structure. Whether it’s a corporation, LLC or partnership, how will the business run during the period when the transfer is taking place? It can be a matter of signatory authority on bank accounts, being able to order inventory, or having someone authorized to sign for accounts payable or receivable to keep daily operations going.

How should you monitor these plans?

Any time there’s a change — in business operations, key employees, family dynamics, goals, etc. — communicate it with the people who helped put the plans in place. Even without changes, it doesn’t hurt to talk to your advisers annually, or at minimum every few years. Even though you may not meet with your accountant or lawyer every year, if you’re working with an investment manager or wealth adviser doing regular performance reviews, a good adviser will ask the questions necessary to help determine whether it’s time to go back and get in front of your other advisers including your accountant and/or lawyer.

Carly Fagan Neals, J.D., is a senior trust officer and vice president at First Commonwealth Advisors. Reach her at (412) 690-2131 or cneals@fcbanking.com.

 

WEBSITE: To learn more about succession planning, visit ask4fca.com.

 

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