How tenants and landlords can have a clear understanding of lease intent Featured

10:53pm EDT March 31, 2013
Phil Coyne, Vice President, ECBM Phil Coyne, Vice President, ECBM

Many times landlords and tenants don’t realize that their commercial lease is unclear, contradictory or out of date until it comes time to resolve a claim, whether it’s a case of liability or property damage.

The payout is then delayed as the insurance companies review the entire lease to try and determine responsibility, liability and how the policy should respond.

“The real world is this — when the landlord and tenants go to renew an option, they just want to renew it. They don’t want to look at anything else because they don’t want to open up opportunities for negotiation that could be detrimental to either party,” says Phil Coyne, vice president at ECBM.

Smart Business spoke with Coyne about how knowing what’s in your lease and fixing problems now will save you a headache later.

What is one of the biggest risk exposures involved with a commercial lease? 

You can avoid significant risk by making sure the lease language doesn’t expand, broaden or increase the liability and exposure to the point where your insurance coverage either doesn’t apply or would be limited. Therefore, each party — tenant and landlord — needs to have an understanding of the intent of the lease and its language.

Also remember that it’s not only the insurance provisions that have an effect on the outcome of a claim, but also definitions, maintenance, landlord/tenant obligations, use of premise and indemnity provisions. The insurance section alone only outlines limits and coverage; it’s the other sections of the lease that outline responsibility and ownership.

If two insurance companies review the same lease, and there are questions, it delays the claim process. For example, who is responsible for or owns the improvements and betterments to the space? Is that the responsibility of the tenant or the landlord?

How can tenants and landlords best mitigate risk when drafting and negotiating commercial lease provisions?

By understanding the intent of the lease and its language, the tenant and landlord can mitigate a potential problem prior to a loss and have an understanding of how their policies will respond.

Therefore, both insurance brokers should have an opportunity to review the entire lease during negotiations. He or she can explain what each party is accepting and not accepting, and how your policy will respond in the event there is a claim.

Some important areas for discussion are:

  • Who is responsible for what, such as common area, tenant space,  maintenance and repairs.

  • Who is responsible to insure these items?

The commonly discussed issues in the insurance section are limits, coverage, indemnity provisions and specific wording, but policies respond to the entire lease and its language in sections other than the insurance section.

How should a lease be updated when up for renewal?

Many times lease options are renewed without re-examining the entire lease’s language. There could be simple items such as a name change or an increase in the square footage, other times it can be a change in use and occupancy and therefore changes in various other sections need to be amended and addressed.

Although the landlord and tenant likely just want to sign a quick renewal, it is important that all parts of the lease are carefully reviewed and understood. This will ensure each side is in agreement on the terms prior to a loss instead of after a loss, as the latter could lead to delays or restrictions in coverage.

Phil Coyne is a vice president at ECBM. Reach him at (610) 668-7100 or pcoyne@ecbm.com.

 

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