How women in business can plan for their financial futures now Featured

11:39am EDT October 1, 2012
How women in business can plan for their financial futures now

The most damaging thing women business owners can do regarding financial planning is nothing.

“It’s often the last thing that people want to talk about because they are so busy living their lives and running their businesses,” says Nancy Kunz, CFP®, ChFC®, CLU®, Lead Financial Planner at First Commonwealth Financial Advisors, Inc. “Then, by the time they figure it out, they are 65 and staring at retirement. A woman’s instinct often is to help everyone else first, to take care of everyone else, and that is compounded when a woman is also running a business,” says Natalia Paich, CPA, AIFA®, Wealth Relationship Manager at First Commonwealth Financial Advisors, Inc. “But sometimes she needs to put herself first and plan for the future of herself and her business.”

Smart Business spoke with Kunz and Paich about business and financial planning for women business owners.

How do women need to plan differently than men?

There is a high probability of a woman being alone late in life, as men tend to have a shorter life expectancy. It is important to take control of finances now, as doing so will lay the groundwork for making the choices for the future. While the thought of taking ownership of one’s finances may seem daunting, doing so both personally and professionally is imperative.

A common mistake made by women business owners is trying to do it all themselves. Instead, get help from the beginning and find the appropriate professional. Most people don’t truly understand their financial decisions and therefore make uninformed choices or no choices at all. When working with a trusted professional, women should ensure that they are active participants throughout the partnership, from hiring a professional to understanding the decisions and implications of those decisions.

What are some of the biggest financial mistakes female owners make with their business?

We mentioned that the biggest mistake women can make in regard to their finances is doing nothing. The same can be said for women business owners using slightly different words, ‘failure to plan.’  Very few businesses take the time to plan income, expenses, management of receivables and cash flows, money for capital expenditures, etc. Women should take the time to create a financial plan for their business. A big part of creating the financial plan is finding the right professional expertise for legal, tax, financial planning, etc. A business owner’s time should be spent doing what she does best — not on the behind-the-scenes mechanics.

Part of creating the right team of professionals includes where to look for them. Women should look for professionals who are familiar with and have experience with small businesses. Spending the money upfront to pay professionals can save a lot of headaches further down the road.

What do women business owners need to know about saving for retirement, and how can they balance that with other needs?

Women business owners have many options to save for retirement. The best option often depends on whether the business owner has employees, and if so, how many. Some retirement options include SEP IRAs, self-employed 401(k), self-employed Roth 401(k), SIMPLE IRAs and Keogh plans. Each type of plan has different contribution limits, may allow for tax-deductible contributions and withdrawal provisions, and may require taxation of monies at distribution.

It is important to consult with a financial adviser and/or accountant to determine which plan is best suited for the business and business owner. In regard to retirement savings, women business owners should avoid using their own retirement money to fund their business. The long-term effect on retirement savings can be significant. Monies designated for retirement should remain in retirement. Monies designated for business development and growth should be used for the business. A woman doesn’t want to find herself at retirement with only illiquid assets.

What should women know about financial planning when one spouse takes times off from work?

Keep retirement funding going, if possible. If one spouse takes time off to raise the family, increase savings into the spouse’s company-sponsored retirement plan and/or consider establishing a spousal IRA. This may not always be an option, so it is important to confer with a trusted adviser. Expectations for the family’s standard of living are paramount not only to planning but also to adjusting to one income, so those need to be realistic and continually reviewed.

If a woman business owner decides to leave her business, she should keep current with her profession so that when she is ready to re-enter the work force or start a new business, doing so will be easier.

When running a business, how can women incorporate their role as a primary caregiver to an elderly parent?

This can be financially and emotionally difficult, especially when paired with taking care of children and running a successful business. This is where long-term care insurance comes in, helping to ease the burden. Women should ensure their parents have long-term care insurance, even if they have to pay for it themselves. Oftentimes, care starts being required when a daughter is trying to raise her own family and her business is taking off.

When purchasing long-term care insurance, do the research to ensure a quality product. Certain companies are better with premiums and rate increases than others, and large annual rate increases can lead to unaffordable premiums. Financial stability of the insurance company is also important, as the need for the insurance may not arise for years.

The peace of mind acquired after confronting one’s own financial planning situation and working with a trusted adviser to put a sound plan in place is priceless, allowing you to focus on other things.

 

Nancy Kunz, CFP®, ChFC®, CLU®, is Lead Financial Planner with First Commonwealth Financial Advisors, Inc. Reach her at (412) 562-3232 or nkunz@fcbanking.com.

Natalia Paich, CPA, AIFA®, is Wealth Relationship Manager with First Commonwealth Financial Advisors, Inc. Reach her at (412) 562-3232 or npaich@fcbanking.com.

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