Security isn't a four-letter word Featured

10:18am EDT April 25, 2005
Security is an interesting word. A person can have security in his or her job. Someone can have security in a marriage. Most would say they feel safe or secure in their home.

Security can be in the form of an insured bank account, one that is backed by the FDIC. Security can also be protection against thieves, muggers or even terrorists.

The word security is used extensively all over the world, especially in the wake of Sept. 11, 2001. We even have a daily security barometer for worldwide terrorist activities. Security is used so often and in so many ways that many of us take it for granted.

In business, personnel and finances are the most valuable aspects, and thus, in need of the most security.

Most corporate executives are high-profile individuals who can become easy targets for all types of security-oriented problems. This risk is part of their job and, in many cases, these executives require special security-oriented services. Here are several worth considering.

* Key management employees must be protected while on the job, especially when traveling. Putting two or three high-level managers in automobiles or airplanes together can be disastrous for both the individuals and the organization they work for, especially in the event of a tragic accident.

Whole divisions or top management can be wiped out in an instant. Top management officers should travel in separate cars or planes. A trained security specialist should accompany each CEO, especially when traveling out of state.

* Top executives should not be easily accessible by the public. Their offices should be in the most secure part of the building. They must be well-informed as to the safest way in and out of the office, especially in the event of a disgruntled former employee.

There must be a well-documented plan for protection, one that has been extensively rehearsed by all top management and security personnel. Panic system devices should be used in all top-level management offices and location devices should be standard equipment in all their vehicles.

* All threats should be taken seriously. Having key personnel within an organization with the proper security background and training is critical. Every company needs employees who know how to react to threats and can ensure that proper precautions are taken.

* All office buildings should be outfitted with the latest security systems. These should provide surveillance cameras and controlled gates at all exits and entrances. All employees should be assigned some type of entrance code. No one should be permitted to enter any office building without picture identification, and all visitors should log in and log out of all office facilities.

Security comes in many forms. One form is in the obvious actions you take to create a web of security around your home and your family. The other form is state-of-mind, knowing that you and your belongings are safe. The same goes for all businesses. A good company shows its security strength in overall appearance, but it also offer security in the minds of its customers.

Dru Rezzetano is president of Citizens Transport LLC. Reach him at (866) 257-5858.