August Movers and Shakers

Bob Seaman, C.C. Hodgson Architectual Group

Bob Seaman, C.C. Hodgson Architectural Group

SS&G recently announced the promotion of Jim Dannemiller, CPA, to managing director of its Akron office.

Dannemiller will focus on growing the Akron office, mentoring new staff, building the firm’s presence in the community and will continue to serve clients. He will be co-managing the office with Mark Goldfarb, CPA. Dannemiller joined SS&G in 1993.

SS&G’s Akron office also welcomes Ilona Aronov as a senior associate in the tax department. Prior to SS&G, Aronov worked as a tax associate at PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP.

SS&G has also announced three new employees to its Cleveland office.

Courtney Ockenden joins as a senior associate in the entrepreneurial services group. Ockenden worked as a senior accountant at Zinner & Co. LLP before joining SS&G.

Mario Ciclone joins as an associate in the tax department. Prior to SS&G, he worked as a staff accountant at Hobe & Lucas CPA Inc.

J. Ryan McNutt, C.C. Hodgson Architectural Group

J. Ryan McNutt, C.C. Hodgson Architectural Group

Steve Newton joins as an associate in the IT department. Newton worked as an IT service specialist at Progressive Insurance before joining SS&G.


First Federal of Lakewood recently announced that Rebecca Ruppert McMahon has been appointed to the board of directors, and Jeffrey Bechtel has been named senior vice president and commercial banking senior lender.

McMahon has devoted nearly 20 years to building a successful legal career in both the public and private sectors. Most recently, from 2009 to 2012, she served as general counsel for Cuyahoga Community College.

Bechtel, a 25-year industry veteran, will lead First Federal’s efforts to establish a broader commercial banking presence in Northeast Ohio, with a focus on traditional commercial and industrial banking opportunities.


Michael Gyure, Director and Senior Analyst of Forensic Accounting, Janney Montegomery Scott

Michael Gyure, Director and Senior Analyst of Forensic Accounting, Janney Montgomery Scott

C.C. Hodgson Architectural Group continues to expand with the announcement of the addition of architects Bob Seaman and J. Ryan McNutt.

Bob Seaman brings more than 25 years of experience as a project manager for a variety of building types, with a specialized focus on the design and management of large health care projects. Most recently, Seaman served as director of health care architecture for the Cleveland office of URS Corp.

J. Ryan McNutt has 13 years in the business, most recently serving as Project Manager for Ewing Cole/Belson Design in Cleveland.


EYE Lighting International, a leading manufacturer of lamps, luminaires, controls, and related lighting products, is pleased to announce the addition of Suzanne Beatrice as the director of HR.

In her new role, Beatrice will be responsible for expanding organizational development goals for all employees as well as leading recruitment, hiring and on-boarding activities for new employees and managing personnel transitions.

Beatrice has worked for more than 20 years in the HR field, most recently with Airgas USA LLC.


Janney Montgomery Scott has announced the hiring of Michael Guyre as director and senior analyst, forensic accounting at the firm’s Cleveland branch office. Guyre, CPA, joins the firm with more than a decade of experience on the sell side as a forensic accounting analyst. He began his career at Arthur Andersen.

How Timothy Yager led a strategy to get Revol Wireless winning again in the prepaid provider space

Timothy Yager, President and CEO, Revol Wireless

Timothy Yager, President and CEO, Revol Wireless

When Timothy Yager started at Revol Wireless in the fall of 2011, the company had been losing customers every month for an extended period of time. Late 2009 through the first half of 2011 were tough years for the organization — rumors of bankruptcy and new ownership were being floated around and the wireless communications provider was in desperate need of change.

“The company was having some financial issues,” says Yager, president and CEO. “So my arrival was a chance to hit the reset button for Revol, not only for our customers, but for our employees and say, ‘It’s a new day. The ownership change has happened and they’ve brought in new management and we’re going to focus the company on winning.’”

When Revol was first launched, it was a more than 300-employee, $100 million company. It had a reputation as being on the cutting edge of the prepaid wireless industry.

“Revol had a lot of success early on because it offered unlimited voice and those kinds of things on a prepaid platform,” Yager says. “They were the only provider in the footprint offering that type of service.”

In 2008 and 2009, other prepaid providers started moving in and the competitive forces grew. In a hypercompetitive industry such as wireless, Revol wasn’t as competitive as it should have been and it quickly began to fall behind.

“They needed some help getting the business turned around,” Yager says.

Here’s how Yager reinvigorated Revol Wireless with a strategy to get the prepaid provider winning again.

Evaluate the business

Prior to Yager’s arrival, Revol’s strategy and day-to-day operations were hindered by its capital structure, which brought about a slow-to-react atmosphere. Once the company was free from that structure, there were a lot of people who were looking for strong guidance, enthusiastic leadership and setting of general objectives to get the company back on track.

When Yager was first introduced to the team, it was a transformation in enthusiasm, direction and general motivation. Everybody suddenly had a place to go and a job to do. Yager brought a lot of that enthusiasm and direction to the table, and that’s exactly what people needed.

“Those first few days and weeks were really about analyzing the team that was here and where the strengths and weaknesses were,” Yager says. “The other thing was trying to change the focus and mindset of the company.”

Yager wanted to instill a strategy that said the company was in it to win it. It didn’t happen overnight, but employees started to recognize that there was a new philosophy.

“Revol had gotten mired in the minutia and a lot of times in companies that are struggling, people retreat from making decisions,” he says. “One of the biggest things I did was come in and start making decisions.”

Simple things like “yes and no” decisions went a long way toward starting to improve morale and helped employees realize there was a new sheriff in town. Yager represented new ownership, new direction and new thought.

“I think people started to feel empowered to be successful,” he says. “In a turnaround situation, one of the biggest things you’ve got to do is make decisions. So often companies get polarized with the fear of making the wrong decision that they make no decision, and I firmly believe that sometimes a wrong decision is better than no decision.

“If people are just constantly treading water and they don’t know whether they’re going up, down, right or left, it zaps the life out of a company.”

People respect leaders who come into a company and lay out a plan of attack, are upfront about the plan and who are forceful.

“I can remember that first meeting and saying, ‘I’m not going to do everything right and I’m not going to pretend to do everything right, but we’re going to make decisions, have short meetings, focus on what needs to get done and we’re going to get it done,’” Yager says. “In our wireless industry, where it is so competitive, we don’t have the luxury of taking six months to analyze everything.

“Sometimes you’ve got to look at the facts, make a decision and move on.”

Be decisive

Revol started 2012 losing customers every month, just as it had been the year prior, but with Yager on board the wheels were in motion for the company to move forward.

“When I came in, one of the first things I did was put some extra incentives out there to our dealers to sell some phones,” Yager says. “I was trying to buy some enthusiasm from our partners to get reinvigorated about selling the Revol brand.”

Another key decision Yager made was to get out in the field and visit a lot of the company’s owned doors and indirect doors to help get the message across that it’s a new Revol and a new day.

“Those were things that didn’t cost a lot of money, but helped move the business forward because it put a face with a name they were starting to see on emails,” he says. “It also gave them a chance to meet me and realize that I’m a relatively aggressive guy.

“When you’ve got five to eight competitors in a marketplace, you’ve got to be aggressive, and by people meeting me and realizing that I wasn’t just saying we were playing to win, they could tell by meeting with me that we want to win the game.”

One of the most crucial issues that Revol and Yager identified that needed to be changed was their network.

“Revol was still operating on an older technology called 1X and had slower data speeds,” he says. “In today’s world of smartphones, Androids and everything else, data is key.”

Shortly after Yager joined the company, the board approved a plan to upgrade the network to a 3G network.

“Our key initiative in 2012 was the company deploying 3G,” he says. “We launched that service in September last year and noticed an immediate uptick in our sales to customers as well as a stickiness of our existing customers.”

Move forward

Yager’s key to helping Revol right the ship was his ability to deliver on his decisions. He was careful not to promise too much.

“I came in and made a few simple promises — two or three key things and then I spent a year beating the drum on those things to do it,” Yager says. “Too often people come in and make a laundry list of 26 items they’re going to promise. No one can get that done in a reasonable timeframe and you lose credibility. Pick and choose what needs to get done and then deliver on it.”

In 2012 Revol was all about getting 3G launched. In 2013 the company is all about selling phones and keeping customers happy.

“When we launched our 3G network we saw an immediate turnaround to our gross sales and our net sales,” he says. “We have more than doubled our sales in January 2013 from January 2012. We’ve really seen that the successes are bearing out.”

Everyone at Revol had to put in the hard work to get the pieces in place, but now that that’s done, the company has seen noticeable improvement. To continue to see those sales and revenue numbers increase, the company has to keep a focus on growing its customers.

“I’m happy to report they are growing,” Yager says. “I’m excited about what we can achieve this year. Last year we had a hard time competing from a sales perspective because we hadn’t upgraded the network. This year we’ve got those key ground-level type things in place, so I’m looking forward to being able to execute and win.

“We have almost a singular focus in 2013, which is to grow the business. There’s really only one way to grow the business, and that’s to be successful in adding new subscribers and keeping existing subscribers.”

How to reach: Revol Wireless, (800) 738-6547 or

Bruce Leon needed leaders ready to tackle any challenge that Tandem HR might face

Bruce Leon, president, Tandem HR

Bruce Leon, president, Tandem HR

Bruce Leon has seen managers who work 12 to 13 hours every day who are not shy about telling others how overworked they are in their job. He’s also looked deeper into the way some of those managers spend their day.

“When you really dive into it, they are doing the same things all the time,” says Leon, president at Tandem HR. “They are dealing with the same sorts of customer issues and complaints.”

Leon tries to encourage managers who find themselves in this predicament to analyze their workday with the goal of getting to the root cause of the problem and coming up with a solution.

“I push them to find the core reason why it’s happening and see if they can get as much done, if not more, and have a regular eight-hour day,” Leon says. “Some of them can’t do it or they are unwilling to admit that there is a better way. They just think it’s a fact of life that they are overwhelmed with work.”

Those who are unwilling to adapt become a big problem for Leon in an industry that is changing by leaps and bounds.

“You can’t make a five-year business plan today with any real comfort that those will be the issues you’ll be dealing with over the next five years,” Leon says. “For many of us, that’s a scary thing not to be able to plan out that far ahead. But I think the critical thing is if you’re able to keep up with those changes, you can have a much better opportunity with customers than those companies that aren’t keeping up with the market.”

And so the key to being one of those companies that can keep up is having leaders who aren’t afraid of change and who see the opportunity in every challenge.

“Are they leaders or are they managers?” Leon says. “I want to know their ability to innovate and I’m really looking to see how much they are proactively looking at change and how much they are reactively looking at change.”

Find your problem solvers

One of the first things Leon wants to see when he’s appraising a leader is proof that he or she is a leader who can get things done.

“You try to find people who have been successful in many aspects of their lives,” Leon says.

“Family, extracurricular activities, philanthropy. What is their involvement? There is no fail-safe method and if there were, we’d all have an easier time of it. But one of the best things you can find is people who can communicate very specifically about how they’ve done leadership things in the past and how they were successful at them. I want specifics and even people I can call to verify it.”

When you’re assessing current leaders, observe how they behave in various situations.

“When a problem arises, they just look for issues where they will perceive to be involved and then quickly exonerate themselves at the expense of throwing other people under the bus,” Leon says. “You see managers who will not let some of their good talent go to other departments, even if it means a promotion to an area where the company really could use them. People who refuse to engage in cross-training and documentation of all the processes they do.”

It takes an effort on your part to get a good read on a person, but it helps you understand which employees you can count on in a tough situation and who doesn’t have what it takes.

“We’re trying to put the right people in place so that we can scale with only having to add lower-level people to build up for the growth,” Leon says. “But I do think the people who are running your company at 30 employees are not always the same people who are going to run it at 130.”

Some of the skills that you look for are a desire to grow, the ability to be self-critical and a willingness to accept constructive criticism.

“It’s the ability to not be threatened by hiring strong people beneath them,” Leon says. “Leaders also have a strong customer service aptitude. They really have a passion for what they do. It’s not a job.”

The ideal leader you are looking for is similar to the manager at Tandem HR who was feeling swamped by his workload and was willing to take an introspective look at what he and his team were doing.

“The ones who are good can step away, get their teams together and go over the core reasons for the problem,” Leon says.

“I had one of them that came up with a call center that has been solving 93 percent of 12 customer issues they were having. It previously took multiple phone calls and voice messages and now we solve issues in eight seconds through the call center. It came about from a manager taking his group out and looking at every customer issue that was coming in and figuring out how they could streamline it.”

Don’t allow silos

Silos are another pitfall for managers. Leaders who feel insecure about their place in the organization often create them.

“People artificially create silos in a way to build their own inner security system or to build a moat around their work,” Leon says. “I think it has to do with egos and peoples’ inability to be open, transparent and willing to share. It’s the perception people feel that if they are the only ones who can do something, they will have job security.”

Having insecure managers in your company is obviously not a good thing. But the bigger problem is created when you have a situation where a leader leaves the company or is unavailable for some reason to deal with an issue related to their department.

“Everybody has to imagine what their job would be like if tomorrow, they were hit by a car and someone else had to step in and do their job for them,” Leon says.

This is not just a mind exercise for Leon, however. He wants a real action plan in place in case such an unfortunate scenario happens.

“I want to see that documented,” Leon says. “I want to see that really existing. I want to see the results of it.”

One of the ways to prevent silos from forming is to occasionally move people around to different areas of your business.

“We switch around a lot of the administrative people in different departments so nobody gets locked into one unit,” Leon says. “It forces people to be cross-trained and it prevents that natural us-versus-them attitude in the company.”

Another step that isn’t always an option for some companies is to put more people under one roof. This was an option at Tandem HR as the company is in the process of consolidating from seven to two locations. The prevention of silos was not the main reason for the move, but it will be one of the benefits when the transition is complete.

“It’s building people to be more non-siloed and building recognition between the family of companies that we have,” Leon says. “We can also streamline shared services. We hope to save a fair amount of money on shared services with the relocation.”

Going forward at Tandem HR, new employees will be given the chance to spend time in different parts of the business.

“Even if they have been brought in as a benefits specialist, they are going to spend some time in payroll or HR or 401(k) or with risk,” Leon says. “They are going to have to learn those units as a new employee.”

The cross training is part of a six-month program where employees learn about other positions as they get up to speed on the job for which they were hired.

“We do monitor their level of competency by their performance,” Leon says. “They take tests along the way as they are learning just so we can gauge how they comprehend the material.”

Check your own ego

As much as Leon works on appraising the leaders in his company, he strongly believes that he needs to fall under the same microscope in terms of how he performs his job as president.

“Many a bad business decision and many a bad leadership decision came from unchecked ego,” Leon says. “Sometimes you have to put people in place, but that can also be you. Every CEO needs their own check.”

The person or people that you ask to judge your performance need to be able to do so with honesty and without concern that negative feedback will be met with hostility.

“Without that, the likelihood that you make ego-related bad decisions or you make bad personnel decisions or you get yourself involved in activities that hurt the company is too great,” Leon says. “It’s a critical point for me personally and one I try to share with CEOs.”

Fortunately for Leon, he seems to have a pretty effective team of leaders, including himself. The company hit $355 million in revenue in 2012 and Leon feels good about the future. But he’s not one to take a lot of the credit for making it happen.

“You have to be thankful every day for having the opportunity you have,” Leon says. “It could change very dramatically tomorrow.”

How to reach: Tandem HR, (630) 928-0510 or

The Leon File

Bruce Leon


Tandem HR

What is the best business lesson you ever learned? Always hire ahead of the curve, both in terms of numbers and talent. There’s more than a 50 percent difference between a $100,000 employee and a $150,000 employee.

As you grow, you need to get better talent and go outside of your budget to get it ahead of time. It’s very difficult to do it after the fact. You often make bad hiring decisions because you’re pressured and then people walk into a situation that’s like a house on fire, which is not a good way to start.

By hiring ahead of the growth curve, it gives you a chance to find the right people, get them trained and not to have the house-on-fire first day. A lot of business people, myself included, say I’m going to wait until I hit those targets or until we get the revenue or our profits are up before we hire that senior level person. Sometimes, it’s too late.

What traits or skills are essential for a leader? Everybody has different leadership styles. For me, my leadership style is that I am very transparent. I admit my mistakes very quickly with my senior executives and let them know they will never get fired here for making a mistake. But they will get fired for withholding information and for not admitting when the mistake happened. I try to lead by example with that all the time.

What’s your definition of success? It’s to know at the end of the day that I did all I could to further the values of this company, and I was able to make an impact in the industry that I serve.


Study your current leaders.

Promote inclusive leadership.

Let people judge your perfromance.

Bill Byham and Development Dimensions International have no lack of good ideas for the R&D process

Bill Byham, chairman and CEO, Development Dimensions International Inc.

Bill Byham, chairman and CEO, Development Dimensions International Inc.

Bill Byham holds a doctorate in industrial/organizational psychology — but that’s not the only way to define him. While he is not only considered an expert in the scientific study of employees, workplaces and organizations, he was one of the first in the world to use a groundbreaking hiring technique called assessment centers.

Some 35 years ago, Byham worked for J.C. Penney Co. when he began using simulated on-the-job techniques to find the most qualified potential employees.

“Assessment centers are a way of evaluating people by putting them through simulations where the people can show what they can do rather than just conducting an interview,” Byham says. “It’s like picking a basketball player — you wouldn’t interview them, you would put them out on the basketball court to see what they could do.”

Byham had great success with these assessment centers at J.C. Penney and wrote an article in the Harvard Business Review that made him famous, gaining the interest of many big companies looking to use this technique.

It wasn’t long until an entrepreneurial opportunity was born. He partnered with Doug Bray of AT&T and started Development Dimensions International Inc., which today is a leader in talent management, leadership development, hiring and talent acquisition.

“We help companies make the most of their employees,” says Byham, chairman and CEO. “We help organizations be more successful in hiring people by teaching interviewing skills. We are very big in the training business, particularly at the supervisory level, where we train more than 500,000 people a year.

“We also have a big business to help companies determine who will be their fast trackers and how to develop them for higher-level jobs.”

Since Byham started DDI, a 1,100-employee, $200 million organization, the company has trained upwards of 20 million people. Today, his focus is on the continued R&D of products in training and development techniques.

Here’s how Byham goes about R&D to keep DDI in front of its customers and on the cutting edge of its industry.

Generate ideas

DDI places a great deal of energy into its R&D process. As a global company, DDI offers its products in as many as 20 languages. Rolling out changes to an existing product or developing a completely new one is a big cost. Costs and language aside, however, to remain an industry leader, you need to have plenty of ideas, and good ones.

“We do so much R&D here,” Byham says. “A problem that we do not have is a lack of good ideas. We have more good ideas than we know what to do with.

“So the first problem is trying to slim down the list of projects because all the projects are in the multimillion dollar range.”

In order to develop all these good ideas that DDI brings to the table, the company fosters a sense of empowerment among its employees.

“The whole company is built on empowerment — that is to empower people to own their job and feel responsible to make decisions,” Byham says. “If you treat your employees so that they feel empowered and they treat their job like they own it, then people will always want to improve and come up with ideas.”

In addition to a sense of empowerment, DDI prides itself on having a management team that is very open to new ideas and has a willingness to make changes.

“That’s one of our big problems — we make so many changes all the time because people come up with new ideas,” he says.

The management team works to narrow down the options.

“We have a series of meetings to cut them out and usually it’s not hard to get it down to eight,” he says. “But then to get it down to two or three new projects is tougher. R&D to us is brand new, game-changing products, or a big change in what we’re doing.”

DDI’s biggest product is called Interaction Management, which is a supervisory training program that is among the best-selling of its kind in the world.

“We try to update it every six or seven years,” Byham says. “That essentially becomes a new product.”

DDI recently finished a new middle management training program. The concept rethinks how middle managers get trained, including what they get trained on and how their skills are developed and what happens after that in the company to make sure they really learn it and apply those new skills.

“It’s not just coming up with a new idea,” he says. “It’s coming up with the whole pathway to learning and change, which starts out with a better understanding of their needs.”

Focus your R&D efforts

Part of having a strong R&D process is being able to not only take suggestions from your customers for products and develop those, but also being able to develop products out in front of what your clients want before they know they want it.

“You have to look at R&D in that sense as a 50/50 balance,” Byham says. “We do a lot of customer surveys. We’re out with our customers a lot and they’ll say, ‘We want a training program on this.’ However, I think it was Steve Jobs who said, ‘If you only give your customers what they ask for, you’ll always be behind.’

“What I’ve always noticed is you have to be out in front of the customer because sometimes it takes us several years to develop these things. If you just try to keep up with that hot topic, we won’t get it out until it is no longer a hot topic. So we have to anticipate needs and then be ahead of that.”

DDI has had instances where it was ahead of customers on products. Just a few years ago DDI developed a product to help companies prepare for retirements and how to handle an older workforce.

“We’ve been way ahead of our contemporaries and competitors on that,” he says. “The bad side is the whole thing is built on the assumption there is going to be a huge amount of retirements. With the economy being what it was until recently, a whole lot of people who were going to retire decided not to. We’re still ahead of the tide there a little bit.”

The R&D process isn’t just about finding the next new product, but also devoting some effort to keeping well-performing, existing products up-to-date.

“The more products you have, the more it costs you to keep the old products good,” he says. “The ratio for us is around 60 to 70 percent old products and 40 to 30 percent new. You have to look at the sales of the old product. If you’re still going up with the old product, you will want to keep investing in it.”

Byham likens it to Tide for Procter & Gamble. There have been 20 new versions of Tide and they’re still making money on it. They’re going to keep that product and put it in front of customers.

“If you really have an excellent old product, like we have with Interaction Management, you would not want to let that go, but you still want to be out looking for new things,” Byham says.

Plan for the future

Byham’s biggest focus may be on R&D, but another forward-thinking area he is keeping in mind is succession planning. Byham is 76, and very aware of his age. He knows that anything could happen at any time requiring someone else to lead the company.

“There’s never been a company more ready for retirements because the whole company is so dedicated to growing our own leaders,” Byham says. “We practice what we preach.”

One of the keys to succession planning that DDI lives by is that you can’t develop everyone for high-level jobs.

“If you try to spread your money out evenly across people, you don’t have any effect by it,” he says. “The first big thing is to define who are the people who have the most raw talent to be developed. Then you have to look at how you accelerate their development.

“You keep on developing everybody and you keep on promoting people, but there are certain people you promote faster who are being accelerated up the ladder.”

DDI also believes that you don’t aim people at high-level jobs. You aim people at a level of jobs, like the C-level, but you don’t name the job specifically because companies today are too dynamic.

“We preach that companies should do away with the old succession plan, which was to take an organizational chart and move people up who are next in line,” Byham says. “We have done all kinds of research that proved that did not work.

“Instead you should get a pool of people who are the most talented and get them to aim at a level within the organization rather than a particular job. Then when the job is open, you choose from that pool.”

How to reach: Development Dimensions International Inc., (412) 257-0600 or



Foster an environment that breeds idea generation.

Focus R&D on a mix of customer demands and brand new ideas.

Think about the future of your company and who’s going to lead it.


The Byham File

Bill Byham

Chairman and CEO

Development Dimensions International Inc.

Born: Parkersburg, W.Va.

Education: He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Ohio University and a doctorate from Purdue University.

What was your first job and what did you learn from that experience?

My family was in the undertaking business. If you work in a funeral home, there’s a lot of work to do. My early job experiences taught me the importance of good interpersonal skills.

How would you describe your work habits?

I value creativity a lot, but at the same time, I have a strong scientific orientation of proving it and challenging and doing research. I’m pretty good about coming up with new ideas, but I’m also very good about punching holes in new ideas and doing research to make sure they really work.

Who is someone you look up to in business?

I looked up to my father. He was an entrepreneur and owned his own company.

What is your favorite DDI product?

It would have to be our supervisory training program called Interaction Management. We have trained millions and millions of supervisors.

Rick Bennet and CCA Global Partners have strength in numbers

Rick Bennet, co-CEO, CCA Global Partners Inc.

Rick Bennet, co-CEO, CCA Global Partners Inc.

With more than 2,700 locations and 800 independent retailers, Rick Bennet oversees a cooperative that has significant strength in numbers. In fact, CCA Global Partners Inc. has more purchasing power in its floor covering business than Home Depot.

Founded by two independent retailers in the floor covering business in 1984, Howard Brodsky and Alan Greenberg, CCA Global Partners’ primary business is Carpet One Flooring & Home. CCA is a cooperative of 14 independent brands in the home improvement industry with more than $10 billion in aggregate gross sales and more than 100 consecutive quarters of profitability. Its retail floor covering stores and its non-floor covering businesses each see annual revenue of about $5 billion.

“These people have come together with our management and our infrastructure and are able to bring scale to their business and compete with big box and other large retailers by banding all of their purchases and resources together,” says Bennet, co-CEO at CCA.

Despite that ability to band together, the downturn in the housing market had an impact on CCA and its independent retailers.

“We entered the downturn early and I would suggest that we’re coming back out of it later,” says Bennet, who was formerly president and CEO of Kauffman’s and vice chairman at May Department Stores. “These guys are small independents and so they have been really rocked. The biggest challenge we continue to face is just keeping people up and moving ahead.”

Bennet has had the task of helping his retailers cope with the downturn, push through it and now move forward.

“We are not exclusively floor covering, but it is at the core of our business,” Bennet says. “Many of the things that we have opened up are things like cabinets or lighting, but they are all home improvement, so we are closely tied to the housing business and the economy has been tough out there and housing has been the worst of it.”

Here’s how Bennet and CCA Global Partners Inc. have helped independent retailers through a tough time and as a result, repositioned them for the future.

Face the facts

In a tough economy it is very hard to have to start rationalizing business and look at cutting costs. When times get tough it comes down to basic math, and you can’t spend what you don’t have.

“You do what you’ve got to do,” Bennet says. “The tougher challenge has really been the emotional one. When you go through five or six years of downturn and you’re waiting for things to bounce back, the drag on people’s patience and emotions is really tough and much more problematic than just the cost cutting that had to happen a couple years ago.”

During those years Bennet often found himself on the phone with owners of their business facing such challenges as having to fire a friend or relative.

“I get calls from guys saying, ‘I need your advice. We’re under a cash flow press and I’ve shed all the workers that I can and I’m now down to family and I’m facing firing my brother-in-law. What do I do?’” he says.

At that point, tough business decisions have to be made.

“You have to save the business first, because if the business is saved and things get better then you can re-employ,” he says. “If the business dies, then you’ve got no chance.”

One of the biggest problems CCA deals with is assuring its independent retailers that it’s OK to ask for help.

“If you’re in trouble as a small business, the best thing you can do is ask for help earlier, because then there’s time to do some of the tough decisions and save the business,” he says. “If you wait until your balance sheet is totally upside down and you’re facing bankruptcy there’s very little that can be done.”

The other challenge CCA faced was market attrition. About a third of the independent retailers in CCA’s space have shut down over the last eight years.

“Our store count is down only fractionally,” Bennet says. “Now that the pendulum is starting to swing, people actually get under more cash flow pressure because they’ve got to invest in buying product as the business starts to turn up.”

Today, business is starting to turn around for CCA and its retailers. Some of them, however, are hesitant to invest in the business, to rehire people and spend money on advertising and marketing.

“It’s tough to cross that line because you’re worried about the next customer that’s going to come in the door or when the next downturn is going to be,” he says, “and you’re nervous about launching a new ad or hiring a new person.”

But that’s where CCA’s decades of experience come in. CCA tries to provide incentives, coaching and a sounding board for people who need to make those tough decisions. The message — the time is now to switch to offense.

“Their brain tells them, yes I should, but their heart tells them, I’ve just been beaten up so badly I’m not sure I can make that investment,” he says. “The market has definitely shrunk, but it’s time to start investing in the business and get market share and it’s hard for an independent guy to step across that line.”

Reinvest and branch out

The first step in getting CCA’s independent retailers back on track following the downturn was to have them reinvest in their businesses to take advantage of new opportunities in the market.

“You first start with people whose basic business is in pretty good shape,” Bennet says. “If somebody still hasn’t made the tough decisions, then you’ve got to make the right business adjustments to your expense model before you go making investments.

“If you’re dealing with a small business that has operated with some discipline, made those cuts and their basic business is in good shape, then you have to start investing in people and advertising to move forward. If the business is growing, then it might be time to push them into the next step, which is to open an adjacent business. If they’re even stronger, then you may suggest that they open a branch.”

CCA itself made similar moves to advance its brands over the years. CCA was originally Carpet Co-op of America. The first strategic change for the company was to move from a carpet co-operative to a floor covering business. What was originally the Carpet One business became Carpet One Floor & Home.

Today, CCA is making the next strategic shift, which is to spread out beyond floor covering into all aspects of the home improvement field, as opposed to filling only one part of it.

“We’ve moved into the kitchen and bath business with cabinets,” Bennet says. “We have a lighting business, and we continue to contemplate other additions to that. We’ll try to engage in anything that involves home improvement so we provide synergies and leads to our dealers, as well as synergies with the customer.”

When looking to break into new markets you have to ask yourself, what’s the value that you’re providing? As you answer that question you determine where you can add on.

“For us it’s a service equation,” Bennet says. “We’re in the customer’s home and we’re providing the service. What other products can you add to that? It’s the question of what do you do well and how do you do more of it rather than trying to add stuff that’s irrelevant to your business.”

Even CCA had to learn the hard way that going too far outside your core area is a difficult undertaking. A number of years ago it tried its hand at tuxedo rentals.

“It was out of our space,” he says. “You get out of your sweet spot and you’re operating a little bit more in the blind, and you bring less expertise and value. It taught us to stay close to home.”

It comes back to that core question of, where do you add value and what are you good at. You have to make sure you get honest answers to that question.

“When you go into a new business, make sure you’re leveraging things that might work for you,” he says. “Whenever it came to standing something up that was brand new because you thought it might fit, you have to second guess it. You can dream up things that you might add to any of those business structures, but if it’s outside of the core of what you do, you have to be careful.”

CCA keeps asking the question, ‘What do we do well and how do we add to that?’

“If it’s small business, it has to do with the home and we can provide scale, then it’s an open place for us to work and we’re always looking for those places,” Bennet says.

“The world of housing has gone through a lot of attrition, so as that bounces back we’re in a terrific position to pick up a lot of share, and being able to bolt on these different extensions of what we do is a lot of fun to work on. We feel better today than we have in five or six years.”

How to reach: CCA Global Partners Inc., (800) 466-6984 or



Don’t be afraid to ask for help in a tough situation.

Make the necessary efforts to save the business.

When good times return, be ready to invest for the future.


The Bennet File

Rick Bennet


CCA Global Partners Inc.

Born: St. Louis

Education: He has a degree in business from University of Central Missouri and a MBA from Washington University.

What was your first job and what did you take away from it?

I was a short-order cook for a little drive-in restaurant called Carl’s in St. Louis. I started working for Carl himself at 90 cents an hour. It was all about good relations with the customers.

What is the best business advice that you’ve ever received?

I had a mentor once say to me, ‘If it is to be, it is up to me.’ That stuck in my head very strongly, and I really believe in the power of self-determination. I try to impress that in our company. If you’re going to spend time trying to figure out how somebody else screwed it up, you’re not going to get anything done.

The second one is Peter Drucker’s advice, which was managing your strengths. So many people spend all of their time trying to correct their weaknesses. You have to know what you’re good at and what you love to do and leverage that. I try to live by that.

If you could speak with someone from the past or present, with whom would you want to speak with?

Abraham Lincoln.

If you were going to redo some flooring in your house, what product would you use?

This new product line of New Zealand wool is exceptional. It’s beautiful. I got out ahead of the launch and put some of it into my home, which we just remodeled. The brand name of it is Just Shorn, as in shearing a sheep. I love the distinctiveness of wool and the softness and warmth under your foot. It’s an exciting addition to what we do, and it’s a terrific product.

Tim Smith faced a big challenge at Verizon PA/DE, but he had the confidence and track record to win over the skeptics

Tim Smith, region president, consumer and mass business markets, Verizon PA/DE

Tim Smith, region president, consumer and mass business markets, Verizon PA/DE

When Tim Smith arrived to lead Verizon’s Pennsylvania/Delaware Operations, he found a group that thought it was performing quite well both from a metrics perspective and in the way it served its customers.

Unfortunately, the data Smith had reviewed painted a different picture of what was happening in the PA/DE region of the $115.8 billion broadband and telecommunications company.

“The challenge I had was taking a group of individuals that had a lot of tenure, with most of them having been in their positions for more than 10 years, and convincing them that they really weren’t as good as they thought they were,” Smith says. “We had a long way to go to provide a compelling service experience.”

Smith was in the midst of a transition from Verizon’s vice president of operations in Florida and Texas to his current position in Pennsylvania/Delaware.

“I had come from an environment in Florida and Texas where, when I left, the operations budget was $4.5 million under budget,” Smith says. “When I came to Pennsylvania/Delaware, they were $7.8 million over budget.”

These numbers were clear evidence of a problem. But when Smith met with operations directors and later with his sales directors in the 3,100-employee region, he sensed very little energy to get things turned around.

“I said, ‘Do you believe that you can get better?’” Smith says. “And they said, ‘Well, yeah, but we’re No. 1 on this and No. 1 on that.’ I looked at the numbers and said, ‘You may be comparing yourself to a certain part of the region. But if you look at this team nationally, you’re not No. 1. That may come as a surprise to you, but you’re not.’ At that point, you could see the expression on their faces change a little bit.”

It was becoming clear to Smith that he had a tough job ahead of him.

Get people actively engaged

As Smith emerged from his first meeting with regional leaders, he felt he had to take immediate action.

“The first thing I wanted to put in place was for them to work with a sense of urgency,” Smith says. “The numbers were decent, but they weren’t where they needed to be or where they could be.

“I talked to them about how they needed to work with a sense of urgency and mapped out where I thought we could be both on the service side and on the expense side and then eventually on the revenue side so we could turn the margin picture of Pennsylvania/Delaware around.”

With that initial message conveyed, Smith then wanted to speak to everyone who worked in the PA/DE region and make sure they understood what he was trying to do.

“I wasn’t just dealing with my direct reports,” Smith says. “I had to make sure the messaging that I wanted filtered down into the organization and got down to the technician level so that they really understood what was going on.”

To get that message across the way he wanted, Smith gathered the directors to develop a new mission statement that had proven effective for him in the Florida/Texas region.

“I changed just a little bit of it so that it fit exactly what was going on in Pennsylvania/Delaware,” Smith says. “I worked with the directors because my philosophy around how I lead is I want to make sure that the team is involved in everything I do. I don’t just create something and throw it out there and see if it sticks and then move forward.”

Smith didn’t want it to be his mission statement. He wanted the directors to take ownership and feel like it was a mission statement that spoke for the entire group.

“I brought in the directors, gave it to them and said, ‘How can we change this to make sure it really fits what we’re going after?’” Smith says. “‘What are our goals? What do we want to do? Do we want to be best in class? If we want to be best in class, how are we going to do that? How innovative is this team? How innovative have we been?’”

Smith talked about innovation, culture, competition and revenue. He wanted to drive home the message that eventually, complacency would lead to bigger problems.

As a means of continuous reinforcement of the mission statement, Smith made sure the statement was always visible to his team.

“I put together a mission statement that I wanted everyone to put in their cubicle, their office and in their garages,” Smith says. “I sensed that if my direct reports were complacent, then there was no question the rest of the team would be that way as well.”

Making the tough call

Smith had offered some tough feedback to directors in the region about their performance. But it was about to get even tougher when he came to the realization that the team needed an overhaul.

“I came in and within the first 30 days that I was here, we reduced almost 400 technicians and a director,” Smith says. “We called it an ISP offering, an income security plan. It allows individuals in the business to elect to leave the business if they so choose. We sweetened it with a pretty good chunk of money. Not only did they get their years of service, but they also got a huge stipend to leave the business.”

It was obviously a difficult decision to make, but Smith felt it was the right call to get things turned around in the PA/DE region. It also made it clear that the status quo was not going to be acceptable.

“I had to be really self-confident in the decisions I was making when I came into this job,” Smith says. “And that had to be really consistent with my values and my belief system. You need to trust that gut instinct that you have to make the right decisions. I didn’t have a whole lot of folks that were cheering for me to do the things I did or make the decisions I made.”

If he did not produce any results, Smith would face a lot worse than the lack of cheering and he understood that. But that confidence he had in his leadership abilities, and the knowledge that he had done it before and succeeded, kept him moving forward.

“I had to show them I could get results and I had to show them I could do it in a relatively short period of time,” Smith says.

Implementing change

Smith’s goals were to cut expenses, improve customer experience and energize employees to work as hard as they could for the company and its customers.

One of the key metrics Verizon looks at is the meantime to restore high-speed Internet due to outages from weather, equipment malfunctions or other problems.

When Smith arrived, he was coming from the best-run operations region in the nation. “We were running in Texas and Florida right around 30 hours for restoral,” Smith says. “In Pennsylvania/Delaware, it was around 56.”

There were other metrics in which PA/DE was way behind as well. And Smith set out to create a sense of accountability at every level of the region.

“I taught them how to look at what I would consider the numbers or the metrics and put together action plans that really drove those numbers where we wanted to go,” Smith says.

As he looked at the team and who knew how to do what, he discovered that some people weren’t trained in all that they needed to know.

“They had groups of individuals that just focused on one piece of the install,” Smith says. “I said, ‘We can’t do that. We need everyone to be accountable for every install every time.’ So we changed our philosophy.”

The key to making this type of improvement work is listening to your team and working with them to bring everyone up to the desired level.

“I have a call with my directors and second-line managers every Friday,” Smith says. “It’s not a call I beat people up on. It’s a call where I hold them accountable and we talk about the actions they had taken the previous week and how those actions either helped them or didn’t help them.

“If it didn’t help them, now I’ve got the team on the call to help them so they can improve the next week. Leaders need to excel at giving feedback and it has to be quantitative feedback.”

Smith says the efforts of the team have paid off in a big way for the company, the region and its customers. The budget has been trimmed, everybody has clearer goals and the end result is actually less work that now needs to be done.

“When I came in here, the amount of work we had every day was more than double what we have today,” Smith says. “Once we reduced it down, we were able to provide a more compelling service experience for our customers. We improved our business meantime restore by 49 percent over the past two years and reduced our overtime by 31 percent. So it speaks to the quality of life our employees now have.”

How to reach: Verizon,

Tim Smith

region president, consumer and mass business markets

Verizon’s Pennsylvania/Delaware Operations

Born: Fort Wayne, Ind.

Education: Bachelor’s degree in business administration, Indiana Wesleyan University.

What was your very first job and what did you learn? Danny’s Pizza Shop. I was making $1.25 an hour. I didn’t live close to the pizza shop, so I had to get up and catch the bus because I wasn’t of age to drive. It taught me discipline. I wanted to sleep in, and I couldn’t sleep in because I had to catch the bus. If I missed the bus, there was nobody at home to take me to work.

Who has been the biggest influence on your life?  My parents always instilled in me a good work ethic. I watched my dad work, and I can’t remember my dad not being at work through the week, other than vacations. Even a few hours on Sunday, he would go in. My mom was the same way. I watched them do the best they could to make ends meet for our family.

What one person would you like to have met? Martin Luther King Jr. It is not because he’s an African-American, but it’s the vision he had for America. Most people have a hard time creating a vision for their own life or household. When I look at my job here at Verizon, I want to make sure I have a vision for not only growing revenue, margins going up and expenses going down, but there are more than 4,000 individuals that count on me to make the right decision. I don’t take that lightly. Meeting a person like Martin Luther King Jr. would just help me even today to solidify the vision that I not only have personally, but it would also help me in business as well.


Be confident in yourself.

Think before you act.

Instill accountability.

Sue Parks – Why exercise is a great way to boost your bottom line and trim your waist line

Sue Parks, founder and CEO, WalkStyles Inc.

Sue Parks, founder and CEO, WalkStyles Inc.

I remember, as a 5-foot-5-inch executive, being at senior-level conferences and trying to act “taller.” I noticed and later read that the majority of CEOs are more than 6 feet tall. That is a personal stat that is hard to change. Lately, there is one other stat that is getting a lot of attention: BMI. For those of you not sure what BMI is, it is a measure of your body fat as determined by your height and weight.

A Wall Street Journal article highlighted research that showed that executives who have a BMI under 25 percent are perceived more positively by peers than those with BMIs over 25 percent. Why? Perhaps it has to do with self-control or discipline or energy levels. Regardless, it is a perception that can impact your career — and your company’s prospects.

The great thing about this is that you can do something about it. And, it doesn’t have to be doing triathlons or taking up hockey again after all these years. It is about moving more every day. How do you know how much you move? You track it.

Consider every other metric important to your company’s success. You track revenue, receivables, payables, aging inventory, product turns, absenteeism, retention and, I am sure, many other things. If it is important, you track it. As we all know, we achieve what we measure.

While you are thinking about what you personally can do to move more, think about how it would help the rest of your senior team and all your employees if they do the same.

How do you get started in this effort?

Create a baseline and then focus on continuous improvement. If you care about productivity, you need to pay attention. Studies have shown that the cost of obesity for every 1,000 workers equates to $285,000 each year. This number includes absenteeism, increased medical costs, worker’s compensation claims and increased drug costs.

Of course, not everyone is obese, although more than 70 percent of the people in the United States are overweight and obesity is now considered an epidemic.

Moving more helps everything. It helps our creativity, it keeps our brain younger, it helps ward off heart disease and cancer. You name it; it helps. (For more information on BMI, including how to calculate yours, go to this web page from the National Institutes of Health:

Make it happen

Wouldn’t it be great if your employees felt as accountable for their own health as they do for other aspects of the company? Productivity will soar, your retention will be at record levels and people will clamor to work for you. I couldn’t grow taller, but I could be in shape.

In a variety of top-level corporate jobs, I traveled all the time so a gym wasn’t always an option. So I put on a pedometer and started tracking.

Soon, my senior team all started wearing them. We started doing walking meetings. One-on-one sessions while we were moving became the norm. We started sharing our goals and cheering for each other.

I personally began tracking 10,000 steps a day. And, we became the fastest growing division within the company — by profits — not by waistlines.

If it seems like a big undertaking, consider an outside wellness expert to help you set up a plan, create the metrics and lead the implementation and engagement.

Yes, size counts. You want increases in your bottom-line and shrinkage at the waistline.

Sue Parks, a former top-level executive with USWest, Gateway and Kinkos, is a corporate wellness expert. She is the founder and CEO of WalkStyles Inc.,, based in Irvine, Calif., and co-author of “iCount, 10 Simple Steps to a Healthy Life.”

Donna Rae Smith: Finding equilibrium between work and life

Donna Rae Smith, Founder and CEO, Bright Side Inc.

Donna Rae Smith, Founder and CEO, Bright Side Inc.

Earlier this year, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg set off a renewed debate on an old question: Why aren’t more women in executive positions? The answer you get depends on whom you ask. Some say it’s outright discrimination, while others argue that it’s an aggressive, inflexible culture that limits women’s advancement or drives them to opt out.

Who is the CEO?

For anyone who questions that there is a problem, the evidence is quite clear. While research shows a correlation between a company’s financial performance and the number of women in its governing body, women held just 14.4 percent of executive officer positions at Fortune 500 companies in 2010.

More than a quarter of companies had no women in an executive officer position. And 48 percent of Fortune 1000 companies had one or no women on their boards in 2012.

As an entrepreneur and business owner for 30 years, I know firsthand many of the challenges that women face in the workplace. One of the most pervasive issues is this: a deeply entrenched belief that productivity and effectiveness are defined by the number of hours you spend at the office.

Any executive today knows that working at least 60 hours a week is standard. While technology has simplified our lives in many ways, it has also complicated it. We’re now expected to be on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week, ready to respond to requests at any hour of the day or night.

At most companies, the rewards go to those who are willing to put work above everything else, and to do it over the long haul. Those expectations are coupled with a complex and ever-changing global environment that make us — women and men — more fearful and stressed out than ever before.

With that kind of prevailing climate in many companies, it’s no surprise that people looking for a sense of equilibrium choose to leave.

Gender representation needs

Until productivity and effectiveness are redefined to allow and encourage contributions of varying levels, we’ll never achieve fair gender representation. Even worse yet, we’ll never get the best we can from each person. We need to redefine successful leaders not as those who work through the night, but as those who are empathic and balanced, those who cultivate productive and healthy people and work environments.

Eventually companies will have to heed the call to re-examine their work cultures, asking themselves hard questions about who is best served by maintaining the status quo. Finding a balance between work and life is gaining increasing importance and can’t be ignored.

Find the right balance

In a global study conducted this year by LinkedIn, entitled “What Women Want @Work,”  63 percent of respondents defined success at work as “finding the right balance between work and personal life.” To the question, “Would you like a more flexible work environment,” 65 percent answered that flexible working would better enable them to manage career and family.

If you’re wondering how to get started, open-mindedness and creativity are essential. You have to be willing to throw out the old to bring in the new. That means a willingness to redefine roles and responsibilities, focusing on what needs to get done rather than how it gets done.

People don’t need to work overtime or full time to be productive, and responsibilities can be divided in innumerable ways.

We must begin by deeply examining our prevailing notions of work and being willing to consider that people can be more productive and effective if we create more flexible, empathic work environments. Only then will we create truly productive, efficient, profitable businesses that add value to the well-being of individuals, families and communities.


Donna Rae Smith is a guest blogger and columnist for Smart Business. She is the founder and CEO of Bright Side Inc.®, a transformational change catalyst company that has partnered with more than 250 of the world’s most influential companies. For more information, visit or contact Donna Rae Smith at [email protected]

Matthew Figgie and Rick Solon: Helping your team work together

Matthew Figgie, Chairman, Clark-Reliance Corp.

Matthew Figgie, Chairman, Clark-Reliance Corp.

Whether in the workplace or in sports, teamwork can produce extraordinary results. While this seems like a relatively simple task, teamwork does not happen automatically. There are a number of factors that are required for a team to develop and work cohesively and seamlessly.

At Clark-Reliance, we attempt to always use the following rules in our interactions:

Help each other be right, not wrong.

This is the underpinning of all successful teamwork. Our employees are encouraged to try to help their colleagues make a correct decision. This helps to avoid duplication of tasks. It also helps to avoid tasks being executed which are not in the best interest of the company.

Look for ways to make ideas work, not for reasons they won’t.

Make sure that you are promoting listening skills. Never dismiss an idea from someone. Listen to what someone else has to contribute and to try to help make that idea work.

Rick Solon, President and CEO, Clark-Reliance Corp.

Rick Solon, President and CEO, Clark-Reliance Corp.

If in doubt, check it out!

Don’t make negative assumptions about each other.

Simply stated — don’t engage in water cooler banter. Instead of fostering negative communication, create an environment of positive communication. If you are uncertain about something, go to the person directly and verify the facts.

Help each other win, and take pride in each other’s victories.

Celebrate your co-worker’s accomplishments. Share compliments. You will find that your enthusiasm is contagious.

Speak positively about each other and the organization.

When you have a chance (internally or externally) speak positively about your colleagues or your company. This can be at press opportunities or charitable events. Always promote the company and your colleagues.

Maintain a positive mental attitude no matter what the circumstances. 

The adage, “Life is 10 percent what happens to you and 90 percent how you react to it,” can be applied in life and business.

There will inevitably be difficult circumstances where difficult decisions will need to be made in a decisive manner. You have to carry a positive attitude no matter the outcome of those decisions. Do everything with enthusiasm because if you have a good attitude, it will come back to you in return.

Act with initiative and courage.

This is Clark-Reliance’s “empowerment team rule.” We spend a lot of time ensuring that everyone in our organization understands that they have the right to participate and are encouraged to take the initiative to help drive positive outcomes, no matter how small they believe their idea is.

We want our employees to feel comfortable to take the initiative to do what they know is right. We want them to understand what the company is trying to accomplish.

Whatever you want, give it away.

This is troubling for some. For example if you want someone to trust you and have them respect and trust you, then you need to engender those same values in someone else.

If you want to be trusted and respected, you have to be trusted and respectful as well.  Those who trust and respect others are generally those most trusted and respected by others.

Don’t lose faith.

There are always going to be times when the rules have been stressed, strained and broken. As long as everyone keeps pushing in the same direction, it will heal itself.

Have fun.

We want everyone to have fun doing what they do. We are direct and serious about running a successful business, but we want employees to have a positive, fulfilled and enriching career, and so should you.


Matthew P. Figgie is chairman of Clark-Reliance, a global, multi-divisional manufacturing company with sales in more than 80 countries, serving the power generation petroleum, refining and chemical processing industries. He is also chairman of Figgie Capital and the Figgie Foundation, a member of the University Hospitals Board of Directors, corporate co-chairman for the 2013 Five Star Sensation and chairman of the National Kidney Walk.

Rick Solon is president and CEO of Clark-Reliance and has more than 35 years of experience in manufacturing and operating companies. He is also the chairman of the National Kidney Foundation Golf Outing.

Tony Arnold: Generational management

Tony Arnold, Founder and Principal, Upfront Management

Tony Arnold, Founder and Principal, Upfront Management

In any business, a group of employees can consist of a diverse group of people. Differences in race, creed, color, sex, national origin and religion can bring a melting pot of perspectives and talent to the daily pursuit of your company’s mission. Proper management of these generations and a greater focus on the differences among them can enrich your business and ultimately your bottom line.

Building a diverse workforce has been a mantra in business for quite some time and as we become more effective at building that diversity, differences in each generation’s approach will begin to surface. Management and leaders of businesses must begin to recognize that their personal approach and desire may not deliver the same desired results in the future.

Leaders need to understand the personal needs and motivators of individuals within their organization. Individual and generational views of health care, vacation, promotions, bonuses, retirement, loyalty, authority, work hours, work approach, communication, work-life balance, etc. are quite different based on personal needs and expectations. Having polices aiming for one-size fits all will simply not work.

Here are a few characteristics of each generation that could dramatically impact how work gets done in your business:

Baby Boomers

This generation is accustomed to personal interaction. They enjoy teams and a take a collegial approach to most challenges. They tend to be workaholics and are willing to work during time typically reserved for home and family. They’re interested in being rewarded for that dedication whether it comes in a bigger bonus or further advancement.

Alternative appreciation such as more time off or vacation usually does not do the trick. This is a group that receives much satisfaction from work. This group relies on its healthcare and is looking forward to retirement.

Generation Xers

This generation is much more independent. However, they have disdain for rigid work hours and authority in general. They lack trust in institutions and corporations in general, which fits with their independent nature.

They are extremely savvy with computers and technology. The group is adaptive to change and will accept a number of job moves in their lifetimes. They work to live, not the other way around.

Generation Y / Millennials

This generation is likened to next level Gen Xers, meaning they take all the same characteristics further on the trend line. They question authority more and they challenge the status quo. Typically, they expect instant responses and are in touch almost real time with the world around them. They are multi-taskers and leave Gen X slightly behind with their knowledge of technology and the growing world of social media.

Telecommuting would be a fine option for them. They’re also very interested in quality of life and are interested in a good ratio of work/life balance. They are open-minded to differences and expect diversity.

Now that we know a little more about the differences inside the generations represented in the workplace, we can make good decisions accordingly. This knowledge is powerful when dealing with important tasks such as hiring and recruiting and how that may relate to the relocation of a key player inside your organization.

It can help you schedule meetings around preferences on work hours and access to information, and it can be worth its weight in gold relative to the retention of key team members and how you structure your compensation and benefits system for maximum impact.

Embracing the differences in your workforce relative to their generation may provide you with important information in order to make the correct choice on key decision points. Chances are that discussion with your team of HR practitioners and a little research in the areas we covered is all you need to make the most of your team.


Tony Arnold is founder and principal of Upfront Management, a St. Louis-based management and executive consulting firm. He can be reached at (314) 825-9525 or [email protected]