Private sector adds 133,000 jobs in May: ADP

NEW YORK, Thu May 31, 2012 – The pace of hiring at companies picked up in May, though the 133,000 jobs created this month came in shy of analysts’ expectations, data from a payrolls processor showed on Thursday.

Economists surveyed by Reuters had forecast the ADP National Employment Report would show a gain of 148,000 jobs. April’s figure was revised down slightly to an increase of 113,000 from the previously reported 119,000.

The report is jointly developed with Macroeconomic Advisers LLC.

“Recent data hasn’t been great, and while this isn’t a horrible number, it shows we’re in a lackluster period in the economy right now,” said Wayne Kaufman, chief market analyst at John Thomas Financial in New York.

Stock index futures trimmed gains immediately after the data, while the dollar held losses against the euro and yen.

The ADP figures come ahead of the government’s much more comprehensive labor market report on Friday, which includes both public and private sector employment.

Private sector adds 216,000 jobs in February

NEW YORK – Wed Mar 7: The pace of job creation by private employers accelerated more than expected in February, a report by a payrolls processor showed on Wednesday.

The private sector added 216,000 jobs last month, the ADP National Employment Report showed, topping economists’ expectations for a gain of 208,000.

January’s payrolls figures were revised up to an increase of 173,000 from 170,000.

U.S. stock index futures added to gains immediately after the data, while Treasuries prices held steady at lower levels.

The ADP figures come ahead of the government’s more comprehensive labor market report on Friday, which includes both public and private sector employment.

“This does suggest we are moving in the right direction,” said Beth Ann Bovino, senior U.S. economist at Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services in New York.

“It supports the expectations of another 200,000-plus in Friday’s payroll report. The jobs numbers are looking healthier.”

Economists polled by Reuters are expecting Friday’s report to show a gain of 210,000 in overall nonfarm payrolls, with the addition of 225,000 jobs in the private sector.

Economists often refer to the ADP report to fine-tune their expectations for the payrolls numbers, though it is not always accurate in predicting the outcome.

Private sector adds 91,000 jobs in August, ADP report says

NEW YORK ― The pace of U.S. private sector job growth slowed in August for the second month in a row with employers adding 91,000 positions, a report by a payrolls processor showed on Wednesday.

Economists surveyed by Reuters had forecast the ADP National Employment Report would show a gain of 100,000 jobs. July’s private payrolls were revised down to an increase of 109,000 from the previously reported 114,000.

August’s gain was the smallest number of private jobs added since May’s disappointingly small reading of 35,000.

The ADP figures come ahead of the U.S. government’s much more comprehensive labor market report on Friday, which includes both public and private sector employment.

Economists often refer to the ADP report to fine-tune their expectations for the payrolls numbers, though it can be erratic in predicting the outcome.

“I don’t think this was a bad number, and I don’t think it changes people’s forecasts for Friday’s employment number. A small miss is not the end of the world, and we all know ADP can be unreliable, though it’s been better lately,” said Steven Butler, director of FX trading at Scotia Capital in Toronto.

The jobs report at the end of the week is expected to show a rise in overall nonfarm payrolls of 75,000 in August, based on a Reuters poll of analysts, and a rise in private payrolls of 105,000.

Government payrolls are expected to shrink for the ninth month in a row, but the decline may not be as steep as in the past three months since 23,000 state workers in Minnesota returned to the job after a partial government shutdown.

A strike by about 45,000 Verizon Communications Inc employees is also expected to put a dent in Friday’s numbers. Neither factor affects the ADP report and Macroeconomic Advisers LLC Chairman Joel Prakken said that could cause nonfarm payrolls to be a good deal weaker than indicated by Wednesday’s data.

While fears the economy is falling back into recession have increased this month, some of the recent data has been consistent with a slow-growth scenario rather than a contraction.

Slower than expected economic growth has fueled speculation the Federal Reserve could launch another round of bond buying — known as quantitative easing — but such a move would likely face political opposition both domestically and abroad.Markets saw little impact from the data. Wall Street opened higher open as comments from Fed officials boosted hopes of more monetary stimulus.

A separate report earlier on Wednesday showed the number of planned layoffs at U.S. firms declined in August after rising for three months in a row, but the cuts were still up sharply from a year ago amid government job losses.

Employers announced 51,114 planned job cuts, down 23 percent from 66,414 in July, according to the report from consultants Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc. July’s figure had been a 16-month high.

But August’s job cuts jumped compared to a year ago, rising 47 percent from 34,768. Cuts at the federal government level led the way and more are expected to come with the United States under pressure to cut federal budgets, the report said.

Private sector adds 157,000 jobs in June; more than expected

NEW YORK ― U.S. private employers added far more jobs than expected in June, bouncing back from a surprise slump the month before, a report by payrolls processor ADP showed Thursday.

The private sector added 157,000 jobs last month, exceeding expectations for a gain of 68,000, according to a Reuters survey of economists.

May’s figure was revised down to an increase of 36,000 from the previously reported 38,000, which had been an eight-month low.

The ADP report is jointly developed with Macroeconomic Advisers LLC.

The figures come ahead of the government’s much more comprehensive labor market report on Friday, which includes both public and private sector employment.

“The ADP results certainly put a bit of an optimistic spin on Friday’s payroll survey,” said Guy Lebas, chief fixed income strategist at Janney Montgomery Scott in Philadelphia.

U.S. stock index futures added to gains following the report, while the dollar gained more ground against the yen.

Friday’s report is expected to show a modest rise in overall nonfarm payrolls of 90,000 for last month and a gain in private payrolls of 110,000.

On Wednesday, a stable employment reading from the Institute for Supply Management’s service sector survey suggested employment growth later in the year.

Economists often refer to the ADP report to fine-tune their expectations for the payrolls numbers, though it is not always accurate in predicting the outcome.